_Robyn_
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I'm looking at courses at uni and physics and astronomy really caught my eye. It was quite vague in the website so anyone who took this course or anything similar tell me a bit about it plz
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NovaeSci
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Is this for a specific University in general? I'm going to be starting a degree in Physics and Astrophysics. From many years of self-studying, I'm pretty knowledgeable if you have specific questions, especially in Astrophysics. I've also heavily researched these degrees at different universities, so can advise there, too.
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_Robyn_
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
Is this for a specific University in general? I'm going to be starting a degree in Physics and Astrophysics. From many years of self-studying, I'm pretty knowledgeable if you have specific questions, especially in Astrophysics. I've also heavily researched these degrees at different universities, so can advise there, too.
Just in general really. I just wanna know what things u study and learn. Like is there more physics than astronomy (or astrophysics) or does it just all tie in together?
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Interea
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(Original post by _Robyn_)
Just in general really. I just wanna know what things u study and learn. Like is there more physics than astronomy (or astrophysics) or does it just all tie in together?
The balance will depend both on the university and which optional modules you can pick. If you just want an example, I've found Warwick uni tend to have good brief module summaries, just click on module names in the links below to get an overview of what sort of thing you might get to do

First year: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physic...irstyrmodules/
Second year: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physic...condyrmodules/
Third year: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physic...hirdyrmodules/
Fourth year: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physic...urthyrmodules/
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NovaeSci
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(Original post by _Robyn_)
Just in general really. I just wanna know what things u study and learn. Like is there more physics than astronomy (or astrophysics) or does it just all tie in together?
To start things off simple, there tend to be 3 degrees which are the most well known (I'll go into some others later on in this post): Physics; Physics with Astrophysics; and Physics with Theoretical Physics. With each of these degrees, you will find there to be more core-Physics modules.

Normally, when you start a Physics (regardless of the name) degree, the first year is usually the same This will build a foundation in Physics and Maths that your second, and especially third, year will be built on. So whilst this year may be the easiest (still very hard) compared to the other years, it is probably the most important.

The first year of a degree normally has you studying from a 1000+ page Physics textbook, which provides a vast variety of different Physics topics. This textbook is usually, nine times out of ten, Sear's and Zemansky's University Physics with Modern Physics. If you check the content list of this book, you will see every subject you are most likely to study.

The second year is similar to the first, in which you'll study core Physics and -Maths modules, but you will usually start to be able to have the chance to study optional modules. It's a bit harder to advise on topics as this can be totally different depending on the University. Also, you will find yourself starting to use textbooks in more specialised topics, which again is down to the University, in which one they prefer. The same is also for the third year, in which you will also usually do a dissertation and research a topic of your choice.

With a straight Physics degree, your optional modules can range from a wide variety of topics, but will usually, if not always, have the core modules as mandatory. This applies to the "with Astrophysics" and "with Theoretical Physics" with having the mandatory core-Physics modules. Astrophysics will have many optional Physics and Astro modules, which the University will have pre-selected a choice for you to choose from; whereas, Theoretical Physics will have more emphasis on optional Mathematics and Computer Programming modules, along with Physics modules.

The above is usually the case for Single-Honours degrees. However, you can study dual honours which usually splits Physics and the additional topic 50:50. Or, you can even pick degrees that may just be named Astrophysics or Theoretical Physics which, as the name applies, are usually built around the degree name, so you can expect a more specialised degree.

The above is just the typical options, but you can get a wide range of Physics degrees such as Physics with Particle Physics, Cosmology, or Planetary Science. Or even mixed degrees such as Physics with Astrophysics and Cosmology. It's best to have a look at different Universities to see the wide variety. A lot, if not most, usually allow you to register for the straight-Physics degree and allow you to change the name of the degree, in your second, or third year, if you decide to specialise. This is usually because the first, and some instances the second, years are usually the same along their Physics degrees.

You will also have the option to study an Integrated Masters year, which includes optional modules on advanced topics, along with a Masters research project.

I'm sure I've missed a load from here, which I could have written. But I'd be happy to answer questions which may shed more light if you have any.
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_Robyn_
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
To start things off simple, there tend to be 3 degrees which are the most well known (I'll go into some others later on in this post): Physics; Physics with Astrophysics; and Physics with Theoretical Physics. With each of these degrees, you will find there to be more core-Physics modules.

Normally, when you start a Physics (regardless of the name) degree, the first year is usually the same This will build a foundation in Physics and Maths that your second, and especially third, year will be built on. So whilst this year may be the easiest (still very hard) compared to the other years, it is probably the most important.

The first year of a degree normally has you studying from a 1000+ page Physics textbook, which provides a vast variety of different Physics topics. This textbook is usually, nine times out of ten, Sear's and Zemansky's University Physics with Modern Physics. If you check the content list of this book, you will see every subject you are most likely to study.

The second year is similar to the first, in which you'll study core Physics and -Maths modules, but you will usually start to be able to have the chance to study optional modules. It's a bit harder to advise on topics as this can be totally different depending on the University. Also, you will find yourself starting to use textbooks in more specialised topics, which again is down to the University, in which one they prefer. The same is also for the third year, in which you will also usually do a dissertation and research a topic of your choice.

With a straight Physics degree, your optional modules can range from a wide variety of topics, but will usually, if not always, have the core modules as mandatory. This applies to the "with Astrophysics" and "with Theoretical Physics" with having the mandatory core-Physics modules. Astrophysics will have many optional Physics and Astro modules, which the University will have pre-selected a choice for you to choose from; whereas, Theoretical Physics will have more emphasis on optional Mathematics and Computer Programming modules, along with Physics modules.

The above is usually the case for Single-Honours degrees. However, you can study dual honours which usually splits Physics and the additional topic 50:50. Or, you can even pick degrees that may just be named Astrophysics or Theoretical Physics which, as the name applies, are usually built around the degree name, so you can expect a more specialised degree.

The above is just the typical options, but you can get a wide range of Physics degrees such as Physics with Particle Physics, Cosmology, or Planetary Science. Or even mixed degrees such as Physics with Astrophysics and Cosmology. It's best to have a look at different Universities to see the wide variety. A lot, if not most, usually allow you to register for the straight-Physics degree and allow you to change the name of the degree, in your second, or third year, if you decide to specialise. This is usually because the first, and some instances the second, years are usually the same along their Physics degrees.

You will also have the option to study an Integrated Masters year, which includes optional modules on advanced topics, along with a Masters research project.

I'm sure I've missed a load from here, which I could have written. But I'd be happy to answer questions which may shed more light if you have any.
Oh wow this is very helpful :O tysm
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