jonathanemptage
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#21
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Well the problem is most land lords don’t really allow pets particularly some something like a cat which can be destructive. Some places might allow fish (I know it’s not quite the same or some rodents (they can be very affectionate and some are really cute (I love gerbils).but you’ll need to check with your land lord .

Personally I think having pets at uni is a dumb idea you’ll be better off joining society’s and going out with your course mates you won’t be too lonely that’s for sure.
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vincentlaw
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#22
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
I wouldn't unless you have ground floor, honestly cats need to get out and I see that being hard in a flat. Plus, as previously mentioned, not only is it extra responsibility but it depends on your landlord.
"cats need to get out"

BS!

Cats are best kept indoors were they belong.
Last edited by vincentlaw; 3 months ago
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username5173262
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#23
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(Original post by vincentlaw)
"cats need to get out"

BS!

Cats are best kept indoors were they belong.
Cats have never belonged indoors, no species has. After all, us humans literally invented the doors. They absolutely can live inside all their lives but a young healthy cat is easily going to become bored and they can start destroying the house or become depressed, if OP has university and needs to go out / study for hours then they can't always entertain a cat, at least letting them outdoor gives them the change to play with others and themselves.

But my main view comes from the moral side, I just personally believe you shouldn't keep your cat indoors.
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TCA2b
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Cats are fantastic animals and I can see why one would help with mental therapy but they come with a number of logistical concerns.

Firstly, if it can't go outdoors, it will need a fairly sizeable flat or house to roam about in. A studio isn't great for that.

They like climbing on surfaces and are very energetic, with a "mad rush" every so often. All furniture is fair game, as are any carpets, so you'd need to consider a scratching post, protecting valuable furniture (especially if it's not yours and will come out of a deposit) and also where you'll be positioning the cat litter tray etc. They're fine with moving between properties and you can do it with a cat carrier, and there's professional companies that can "taxi" them.

Secondly, a lot of landlords don't allow for pets. It's not like you won't find one that allows them, but it's a lot of extra work, because agencies often don't advertise it or mention it upfront. Usually it's negotiable but don't assume it will be allowed. Sometimes it will entail paying a higher deposit.

Thirdly, longer haired ones shed fur like mad.
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artful_lounger
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Do you have the time and money to take care of a pet? As a student? Unlikely. Remember you will need to pay for all the cats shots, for them to be spayed/neutered, chipped, animal insurance, their food, toys and so on (these aren't optional, as they're actually necessary for the animal's wellbeing to be appropriately stimulated; also if you don't buy any they will destroy your things).

Also, you need to find somewhere to rent that accepts pets. Most landlords do not. I don't think any student accommodation or designated student lets will accept them. Additionally you need to question whether it's really fair to just leave the cat at home all day while you are at uni - while they are more self sufficient than dogs, it's going to very quickly get bored even with lots of toys available to it. If you plan on letting it roam freely outside while you are gone that opens up a whole host of other issues..

I can't see any situation where it is a realistic option for school leavers going to uni to have a pet other than maybe fish (and honestly that is still not ideal because aquatics is an expensive hobby/pet option and does require a lot of time to get it set up. And you still might struggle to find somewhere to live that will let you have a fish tank, although outside of student accommodation/lets this is usually less of an issue for landlords).
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lcvedingdong
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#26
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(Original post by Bbfreedom 2)
OK mate
???
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Anonymous #2
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#27
(Original post by dingdongbtches)
???
I just said ok
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lcvedingdong
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#28
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I just said ok
No point going anonymous as everyone knows your original user lmao...
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username4521132
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if the cat is ******** everywhere, ripping up carpets, being needy af, costing a shed load in cat food
it probably won't improve your mental health
Last edited by username4521132; 3 months ago
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vincentlaw
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#30
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
Cats have never belonged indoors, no species has. After all, us humans literally invented the doors. They absolutely can live inside all their lives but a young healthy cat is easily going to become bored and they can start destroying the house or become depressed, if OP has university and needs to go out / study for hours then they can't always entertain a cat, at least letting them outdoor gives them the change to play with others and themselves.

But my main view comes from the moral side, I just personally believe you shouldn't keep your cat indoors.
FELV, FIV, cars, foxes, target practice etc
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username4986690
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#31
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(Original post by vincentlaw)
FELV, FIV, cars, foxes, target practice etc
Is that why you don't go outside?
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vincentlaw
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#32
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#32
(Original post by DiddyDec)
Is that why you don't go outside?
Try harder suga
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lorry237
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#33
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(Original post by Anonymous)
You wouldn't be allowed a cat with the landlord so now plus why do you think a cat will help with mental health. If anything it will make it worse because you'll have to have an extra responsibility which might be stressful. Just get some flat mates
why would they not be allowed a cat with the landlord? :confused: I'm literally taking my dog and my cat with me next year to uni
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
I wouldn't unless you have ground floor, honestly cats need to get out and I see that being hard in a flat. Plus, as previously mentioned, not only is it extra responsibility but it depends on your landlord.
cats absolutely do not need and shouldn't get out, it's dangerous...
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username4986690
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#35
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(Original post by lorry237)
why would they not be allowed a cat with the landlord? :confused: I'm literally taking my dog and my cat with me next year to uni
Most landlords don't allow pets, have you checked your contract?
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lucyyy12
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#36
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi, I am starting my first year at uni in September and planning on getting a studio/ 1 bed flat. I like the idea of living independently more than living with other people but also am worried about getting lonely and my mental health deteriorating, I suffer from Depression, OCD and Anxiety and I am scared that this may affect me negatively living alone.
I was thinking about getting a cat since I love animals and I think it would keep me occupied and less lonely / depressed, but I am scared it won’t be a good idea as I would want the cat to live a happy comfortable life and a flat might not be the best environment.
What do you guys think?
you may be allowed it if it registers as an emotional support animal.
my friend had a rabbit and it really helped her, plus it was easy to look after and was okay being left alone.
As long as you cat-proofed your flat I’m sure it would be fine

Also make sure you have pet insurance and everything
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anniisa97
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#37
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(Original post by Anonymous)
You wouldn't be allowed a cat with the landlord so now plus why do you think a cat will help with mental health. If anything it will make it worse because you'll have to have an extra responsibility which might be stressful. Just get some flat mates
ever heard of the term "emotional support animal"? animals usually help with these things
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username4986690
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(Original post by lucyyy12)
you may be allowed it if it registers as an emotional support animal.
my friend had a rabbit and it really helped her, plus it was easy to look after and was okay being left alone.
As long as you cat-proofed your flat I’m sure it would be fine

Also make sure you have pet insurance and everything
Emotional Support Animals are not recognised under UK law.
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sunshine774
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Only get a cat if you know you can look after it properly. I.e. make sure there's enough space in your flat and that it will be able to run around and get fresh air. Animals should not be kept cooped up.
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anniisa97
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Emotional Support Animals are not recognised under UK law.
seriously? so does that mean its not possible to get an emotional support animal in the UK?
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