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    My friend was diagnosed bi-polar about a year ago and has been taking medication and seeing a counsellor. I didn't know this until the summer- although I did know something was different because he was off college for ages (and kept ignoring me when I tried phoning/emailing/texting him) + then when I saw him he was unbelivably hyper-active- obviously now I understand what was going on. So in the summer we had a big long chat and he explained everything to me and I didn't take it very well + I got really upset. Since then he's completly ignored me- I think this is because I got upset he doesn't think I can handle what's going on. However, because we have mutual friends I know what he's up to and have found out recently that he's been taking hard drugs and now worry about him constantly...I feel so hopeless and feel that I need to at least try and talk to him.

    So basically what can I do? What can I say? Does any one know someone who suffers from bi-polar and could advise me on how to deal with this situation?
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    One of my close friends also suffers from this. The best thing you can do is just have a read on the internet make sure you're fully aware and that you understand. and just tell your friend that you dont think any less of him, you love him just as much and if he wants anyone to talk to, laugh with, a shoulder to cry on.. you'll be there.
    then just forget about it and carry on as normal
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    I have bi-polar myself and the way you reacted wasn't ideal but in a sense is understandable, I suppose, when you heard what he had. You need to ask him to meet you for a meal, drink, anything, and let him know that you care. Take it from me, people telling you they care does make a difference, even if I may not have shown it at the time they told me. Don't talk to him like you know all about his condition - you don't - just let him know you're his friend and you care. You can't do much more than that. Be prepared for bad days, when he's so down he'll reject your offers of friendship - I've done it to my friends and it's just part of it. But be there for him. Believe me he'll appreciate it.
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    - Don't treat them as 'special' as such - they are just normal people with more defined stages of how their mood can go.
    - Ensure you know good ways to cheer them up, during the down state they can still be happy just as anyone can, it is just they start lower as such.
    - Be more understanding to them, especially during their down stage.

    Based on talks with a friend, and own knowledge.
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    Thanks for your advice OhSoRetro, I actually got a bunch of books about Bi-polar after we'd had a chat to try and understand what's going on so I feel a bit more use when talking to him.

    My major issue right now is with the drugs and stuff because although I realise things are pretty bad at the moment he's being an idiot and if he carrys on the way he is I can just see him really mucking up his life. But at the same time I don't wanna come across as being really patronising because ultimately as much as I try and understand what he's going through I can't get in his head.....argh it's such a tricky situation.
 
 
 
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