How do you feel about performing surgeries, blood and all that stuff?

Watch this thread
sldj
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I'm trying to understand whether I should study med or not, and whether my feelings about surgeries and blood (Im v squeamish) are fine. So I am asking how you guys feel about those things, to compare this to my situation.
I am positive that I can overcome disgust about blood and etc, but I am also sure, that I will never like all those gorey things. The idea of surgery and cutting somebody makes me feel weird, not even disgusted just really strange. I am still fascinated by biology, scientific aspect of med and how human body works.

So I wanted to ask, do you guys feel fascinated by blood and stuff? and when you have to deal with those things (as in surgery), do you do it with some sort of awe and fascination or do you just get over it w/o feeling much or even have to fight disgust or fear? if you used to feel/disgusted weird, how did you overcome it?

And finally, do you have any "philosophical" approach to surgeries, other than thinking you're saving lives/ just working? I for example like to think that human body is like a machine and surgeons act as engineers when they repair it, which really calms my disgust/disturbance.
Last edited by sldj; 1 year ago
0
reply
Cloudiii
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Personally I could never which is why I am going to study biomedical science instead. I respect surgeons and the work they do but I could never be the one operating. I prefer the more research side of things.
0
reply
username3477548
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
Yeah I can deal with blood no problem. I know some people who t faint at the sight of blood ):
Last edited by username3477548; 1 year ago
0
reply
sldj
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Qxi.xli)
Yeah I can deal with blood no problem. I know some people who t faint at the sight of blood ):
if it''s fine to ask, did you always have this attitude, or did you feel stronger about it in the beginning?
Last edited by becausethenight; 1 year ago
0
reply
Helenia
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Well, for starters, you don't HAVE to be a surgeon. And while you may be invited to assist in theatre as a student/have to as a junior doctor, it's pretty rare that you'd actually be doing the cutting - mostly just holding things. But if surgery is not your thing you can pick jobs to minimise your exposure to it, though remember this is 6 years away from now, you'll be older and much more experienced so may feel totally differently.

The other thing worth noting is that the prepping, draping etc makes it easier to focus on the relevant area and think less about it being an actual human in there - the surgeon can just concentrate on the abdomen/leg/whatever. It's my job to keep the patient alive while they do it. I love what I do but could never be the one wielding the knife!
Last edited by Helenia; 1 year ago
0
reply
username3477548
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by sldj)
if it''s fine to ask, did you always have this attitude, or did you feel stronger about it in the beginning?
Yeah it's fine don't worry. Yeah I used to be a bit more squeamish at the sight of blood but now I'm alright with it x
0
reply
Letournel
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by sldj)
I'm trying to understand whether I should study med or not, and whether my feelings about surgeries and blood (Im v squeamish) are fine. So I am asking how you guys feel about those things, to compare this to my situation.
I am positive that I can overcome disgust about blood and etc, but I am also sure, that I will never like all those gorey things. The idea of surgery and cutting somebody makes me feel weird, not even disgusted just really strange. I am still fascinated by biology, scientific aspect of med and how human body works.

So I wanted to ask, do you guys feel fascinated by blood and stuff? and when you have to deal with those things (as in surgery), do you do it with some sort of awe and fascination or do you just get over it w/o feeling much or even have to fight disgust or fear? if you used to feel/disgusted weird, how did you overcome it?

And finally, do you have any "philosophical" approach to surgeries, other than thinking you're saving lives/ just working? I for example like to think that human body is like a machine and surgeons act as engineers when they repair it, which really calms my disgust/disturbance.
Just don't do surgery and you'll be fine
0
reply
Turning_A_Corner
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
The human body is generally quite disgusting when you’re having to get up close and far too personal with it. Sometimes wearing a mask has really saved me from the very unprofessional prospect of visibly gagging in front of a patient I’ve been working with. And it’s not just surgery and invasive specialisms where you see this. Some of the most mortifying things you’ll see can be in the most non-invasive disciplines. I had to spend the better (or worse) part of an hour with a patient yesterday who wouldn’t stop picking his nose and eating everything he extracted (not before asking my opinion on it first or, occasionally, asking if I wanted to try it). This was interspersed with him regularly scratching in all kinds of places I really didn’t need to see. This guy had brain mets and had personality changes and reduced impulse control. I’ve had people disclose to me criminal offences, been sexually harassed, had to leave an assessment because a patient wouldn’t stop masturbating in front of me. My first day on the job I nearly passed out because I was confronted with so many men with parts of their skulls missing because their cranioplasties had all been cancelled because of Covid. My role was supposedly as non-invasive as it gets. Too bad the patients hadn’t been told!
You get used to it. But all parts of medicine and healthcare are messy to one degree or another. You gain resilience, you gain insight into the fact that some people can’t help their behaviour but you can help yours. And the fact that a patient is so vulnerable and that you’re the person in the position to help them is something that gradually gets through to you.
I don’t think I really approach the human body with awe and fascination (it becomes too mundane after a while) but I really don’t recommend thinking of the body as a machine. There’s a life attached to that body. If you’re making a decision that affects that body, you are making a decision that affects that life. Take ENT for example. In your analogy, taking out someone’s larynx and reorganising their airway and oesophagus access is just a simple case of rewiring. In reality? You’re taking away that person’s voice forever. They’ll never sing, never laugh, never cry again. Something effortless and essential as communicating will become effort full and often frustrating, potentially requiring daily maintenance (assuming they have a speaking valve fitted). All machines of the same spec are alike; not so for people. Not everyone is suitable for an operation. Surgeons having respect for the lives they’re impacting is essential to their decision-making process. They’re not just engineers or maintenance workers.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

Do you know what you'll do if you don't get the grades you're hoping for?

Find something else in clearing (40)
29.2%
Take a gap year (21)
15.33%
Resit my exams (37)
27.01%
Look for alternate pathways to the career I want (18)
13.14%
I don't know yet (15)
10.95%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (6)
4.38%

Watched Threads

View All