Why would you pay for student accommodation?

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Anonymous #1
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Hey guys. So I’m going to Year 13 so I’ll be going to uni soon. I’ve been checking student accommodations in universities like London South bank and Greenwhich and the usual cost of it it’s around £190-250 a week which would be around £760-1000 a month.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to rent a normal 1 bedroom or Studio apartment from a landlord for that price instead of a small student accommodation? Aren’t the room tiny, halls are loud and you have to share things? I get some people would like the company though.

So Why do people usually live in Student accommodation when they can have their own private house to themselves for the same price? Or is there financial support and rent paid for students that’s why they live there? I’m so confused
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lorieh
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That’s the problem with London accommodation lol. But then again, the problem with London is that it’ll be expensive anywhere.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey guys. So I’m going to Year 13 so I’ll be going to uni soon. I’ve been checking student accommodations in universities like London South bank and Greenwhich and the usual cost of it it’s around £190-250 a week which would be around £760-1000 a month.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to rent a normal 1 bedroom or Studio apartment from a landlord for that price instead of a small student accommodation? Aren’t the room tiny, halls are loud and you have to share things? I get some people would like the company though.

So Why do people usually live in Student accommodation when they can have their own private house to themselves for the same price? Or is there financial support and rent paid for students that’s why they live there? I’m so confused
A one-bed flat in Greenwich for £760 a month? Good luck with that. You'd get a one-bedroom house-share for that, but not a flat on its own.

Halls have the distinct advantage of having other people in them - it can be very isolating living out and on your own, especially in the first year.
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lorieh
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Realistically, you won’t get a flat cheaper than student accommodation. Student accommodation can look pricy, but all your bills like electricity, WiFi, etc are included so the pricing isn’t as bad.

You’re not gonna be able to afford a “normal one bedroom flat” from a landlord in London because it’s expensive.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
A one-bed flat in Greenwich for £760 a month? Good luck with that. You'd get a one-bedroom house-share for that, but not a flat on its own.

Halls have the distinct advantage of having other people in them - it can be very isolating living out and on your own, especially in the first year.
I didn’t mean a one bed flat in Greenwhich for 760. I said between 760-1000 and Greenwhich is quite an expensive area so maybe you could find a Studio flat for around 800 or 900 in a cheaper area? Better than student accom tbh.
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Desideri
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In some places flat/house shares can be cheaper than halls. I’m currently paying a lot less to rent a room in a flat than I paid for a room in halls, but I’m glad I stayed in halls in first year. The social side was good, there was security on site if needed, bills were included which saves that hassle, and they were much quicker at fixing issues than any private landlord I’ve had (this may depend on your uni though).

I’d be surprised if you can find many one bed flats in Greenwich for under £760 a month. Especially ones that are in a good state and are happy to let to students. In general, if you want to save money on accommodation, look at unis outside of London.
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random_matt
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Tons of students will not be going come August/September anyway. Covid cases amongst your age group will be nuts, and we all know another lock down or heavy restrictions will happen.
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Callicious
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One word: Homeshares. You can find lots online and it's way better than student accom, if you can find one and you're lucky. Many aren't great, but many are.

Student accom is a decent deal generally. Has insurance, bills, maybe even a cleaner, etc. Not as flexible as homeshares though. Renting yourself? Usually the same price once you factor in insurance, tax, etc (if applicable.)
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Sinnoh
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I didn't have to share anything in my uni halls
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londonmyst
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Many students move into student accomodation in order to best experience the student lifestyle living in very close proximity to fellow students, as a means of leaving the family home or as an alternative to living in a non-student houseshare.
I couldn't afford to live in a London student only complex as an undergrad so rented a room in mixed private houseshares.
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Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey guys. So I’m going to Year 13 so I’ll be going to uni soon. I’ve been checking student accommodations in universities like London South bank and Greenwhich and the usual cost of it it’s around £190-250 a week which would be around £760-1000 a month.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to rent a normal 1 bedroom or Studio apartment from a landlord for that price instead of a small student accommodation? Aren’t the room tiny, halls are loud and you have to share things? I get some people would like the company though.

So Why do people usually live in Student accommodation when they can have their own private house to themselves for the same price? Or is there financial support and rent paid for students that’s why they live there? I’m so confused
Hello,

Student accommodation offers many different benefits that make it a great choice for first years.

As the university manages the accommodation, rent is always taken termly when each loan is released and bills tend to be included. This helps with budgeting as you cannot spend your rent money as it is the first thing to leave your account and you don't have to worry about managing bills. This is a good way to integrate yourself into independent life and then in your second year you will be more prepared for monthly rent (if that is what the landlord requests) and budgeting bills is easier as you have budgeted for a year already.

Some halls offer catering options which mean that all of your meals are included and so you do not have to worry about food shops, preparation or cooking and this can be a big selling point for some.

The community is often the biggest selling point though. Everyone is in one place meaning it is easy to have parties, meet ups and make friends. Private accommodation can be lonely and whilst independence is brilliant, in a flat you are given 5 friends to get to know and live with. You can also choose en suite so you only have to share the kitchen.

Unfortunately, London is just very expensive. Our most expensive accommodation is £165 in York (YSJ) but we do have cheaper options than that. You will get a bigger loan to help you cover expenses though!

I hope this helps,
Lydia
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University of Sunderland Student Ambassador
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey guys. So I’m going to Year 13 so I’ll be going to uni soon. I’ve been checking student accommodations in universities like London South bank and Greenwhich and the usual cost of it it’s around £190-250 a week which would be around £760-1000 a month.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to rent a normal 1 bedroom or Studio apartment from a landlord for that price instead of a small student accommodation? Aren’t the room tiny, halls are loud and you have to share things? I get some people would like the company though.

So Why do people usually live in Student accommodation when they can have their own private house to themselves for the same price? Or is there financial support and rent paid for students that’s why they live there? I’m so confused
I think it depends on your preference and what you want to get out of your accommodation. I personally really enjoyed halls, and liked the social aspects of living with fellow students however I can totally see the benefits to living private too. Not everything in halls is shared, there's different options depending on your budget, so there were options to share a bathroom but you can also opt for a bedroom with an ensuite for example. Not all rooms are tiny, again it depends on the uni and what they offer but noise can be an issue so. if you prefer the quiet, living somewhere private might be a better option.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey guys. So I’m going to Year 13 so I’ll be going to uni soon. I’ve been checking student accommodations in universities like London South bank and Greenwhich and the usual cost of it it’s around £190-250 a week which would be around £760-1000 a month.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to rent a normal 1 bedroom or Studio apartment from a landlord for that price instead of a small student accommodation? Aren’t the room tiny, halls are loud and you have to share things? I get some people would like the company though.

So Why do people usually live in Student accommodation when they can have their own private house to themselves for the same price? Or is there financial support and rent paid for students that’s why they live there? I’m so confused
I live in london and I’m going to be starting uni in london this year and will be staying in accom for at least the first year. I can tell you for free, finding accommodation at that price that’s big specifically marketed to students is gonna be extremely rare.
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