__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#1
Hi guys, so I’m thinking of applying to Oxbridge for economics masters but I’m not sure if I even have a chance.

Undergrad: LSE
Degree: PPE

Grade: 69.4 (so far, I’m only in year 3 of 4)
but only 64 in Macro, 66 in Metrics and 58 in Micro and 78 in 1st year econ and 75 and 86 in Math and 74 in Stats to name a few. I know they same minimum strong 2:1 but I feel like my average is just too low. Thoughts?
0
reply
KatetheLecturer
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 months ago
#2
You definitely won't have a chance if you don't apply! That said, you will be up against people with Firsts (not having one doesn't rule you out, though) *but* 69% going into final year makes me think you'll have an excellent chance of attaining a First this year (most people pull their grades up in their final year) plus, it's also a very strong 2:i also. 58% in micro is obviously not ideal, but if this was this last academic year, they'll likely cut a bit more slack than usual (there's also an option to ask them to consider mitigating circs, if you feel your university hasn't accounted for them - there should be a link on the course home page) and also, one grade that's somewhat lower than your normal range doesn't really count for too much - if we see something like that, which is rather anomalous, we tend to assume that there was perhaps issues with the class, or one of the assessments, or you didn't gel with the tutor, or whatever: it shouldn't, on its own, prevent you from being considered.

I realise you have to invest (most likely, anyway, unless you are exempt) £75 in applying -but if you were my student, with that profile, I'd be strongly suggesting you consider it, and coming from LSE will also improve your chances too, as it's known to be very strong in economics in particular, for obvious reasons. Worst case scenario, they don't accept you - you can then reapply with your First Class degree next autumn, and take a year out to stash the cash in preparation, or go somewhere else in September (maybe even stay on at LSE?) instead.
0
reply
BasicMistake
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 months ago
#3
Sorry your modules and grades seem a little muddled so could you make them a little clearer? Also what are the modules you think you'll take in your final year?

Obviously being on a First would be better but I wouldn't say that a 2:1 rules you out, especially since you are so close to the boundary. As the person above me said, an economics-related degree from LSE is a very good signal regardless.

Anecdotally, I think entry standards are higher for the Oxford MPhil than the Cambridge MPhil. This is because the Oxford course is two years and feeds directly to their DPhil programme. In Cambridge, the MPhil is one year and designed for those planning on working afterwards; they have a separate MRes course for those wanting to do the DPhil. So, and take this with a grain of salt, Cambridge might be a little bit more lenient but only just because again these are high demand courses at prestigious universities.
0
reply
__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#4
(Original post by KatetheLecturer)
You definitely won't have a chance if you don't apply! That said, you will be up against people with Firsts (not having one doesn't rule you out, though) *but* 69% going into final year makes me think you'll have an excellent chance of attaining a First this year (most people pull their grades up in their final year) plus, it's also a very strong 2:i also. 58% in micro is obviously not ideal, but if this was this last academic year, they'll likely cut a bit more slack than usual (there's also an option to ask them to consider mitigating circs, if you feel your university hasn't accounted for them - there should be a link on the course home page) and also, one grade that's somewhat lower than your normal range doesn't really count for too much - if we see something like that, which is rather anomalous, we tend to assume that there was perhaps issues with the class, or one of the assessments, or you didn't gel with the tutor, or whatever: it shouldn't, on its own, prevent you from being considered.

I realise you have to invest (most likely, anyway, unless you are exempt) £75 in applying -but if you were my student, with that profile, I'd be strongly suggesting you consider it, and coming from LSE will also improve your chances too, as it's known to be very strong in economics in particular, for obvious reasons. Worst case scenario, they don't accept you - you can then reapply with your First Class degree next autumn, and take a year out to stash the cash in preparation, or go somewhere else in September (maybe even stay on at LSE?) instead.
Thank you so much for this response. I’ll definitely apply to LSE, Cam, and Oxford. Do you have any thoughts on whether similar programs at say Durham, St Andrew’s and UCL are worth exploring?
0
reply
__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#5
(Original post by BasicMistake)
Sorry your modules and grades seem a little muddled so could you make them a little clearer? Also what are the modules you think you'll take in your final year?

Obviously being on a First would be better but I wouldn't say that a 2:1 rules you out, especially since you are so close to the boundary. As the person above me said, an economics-related degree from LSE is a very good signal regardless.

Anecdotally, I think entry standards are higher for the Oxford MPhil than the Cambridge MPhil. This is because the Oxford course is two years and feeds directly to their DPhil programme. In Cambridge, the MPhil is one year and designed for those planning on working afterwards; they have a separate MRes course for those wanting to do the DPhil. So, and take this with a grain of salt, Cambridge might be a little bit more lenient but only just because again these are high demand courses at prestigious universities.
Sorry for the confusion:

First year:
Math: 76
Econ:78
Politics:60
Philosophy: 66
Stats: 58

2nd year:
Maths: 86
Politics: 68
Stats: 74
Micro: 58
Logic: 71

3rd year:
Macro: 64
Metrics: 66
Philosohy of Econ: 72
Politics II: 72
Political Economy: 69

I’ve heard that about Cambridge as well. Would it be easier to get into Mphil Econ or Mphil Econ + Finance at Cambridge do you think?
0
reply
BasicMistake
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 months ago
#6
(Original post by __Khaleesi)
Sorry for the confusion:

First year:
Math: 76
Econ:78
Politics:60
Philosophy: 66
Stats: 58

2nd year:
Maths: 86
Politics: 68
Stats: 74
Micro: 58
Logic: 71

3rd year:
Macro: 64
Metrics: 66
Philosohy of Econ: 72
Politics II: 72
Political Economy: 69

I’ve heard that about Cambridge as well. Would it be easier to get into Mphil Econ or Mphil Econ + Finance at Cambridge do you think?
Maths and Stats in your second year look good. Lower mark in Micro in second year could be better but respectable 2:1 in Metrics. What economics modules are you doing in your fourth year?

MPhil Econ will be easier for you I reckon. You have no finance background (academic and I assume professional) and intake for the Finance & Econ course is lower.
0
reply
__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#7
(Original post by BasicMistake)
Maths and Stats in your second year look good. Lower mark in Micro in second year could be better but respectable 2:1 in Metrics. What economics modules are you doing in your fourth year?

MPhil Econ will be easier for you I reckon. You have no finance background (academic and I assume professional) and intake for the Finance & Econ course is lower.
Thank you. Yes I have no finance background at all. I think I shall take Public Economics in my fourth year to bolster my microeconomics background. I also have an outside option to take any course at the university. Do you think I should be looking to take an additional economics course alongside Public?
0
reply
BasicMistake
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 months ago
#8
(Original post by __Khaleesi)
Thank you. Yes I have no finance background at all. I think I shall take Public Economics in my fourth year to bolster my microeconomics background. I also have an outside option to take any course at the university. Do you think I should be looking to take an additional economics course alongside Public?
What are your options? Basically you need to demonstrate that you are comfortable with economics despite not doing a pure economics degree.
2
reply
__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by KatetheLecturer)
You definitely won't have a chance if you don't apply! That said, you will be up against people with Firsts (not having one doesn't rule you out, though) *but* 69% going into final year makes me think you'll have an excellent chance of attaining a First this year (most people pull their grades up in their final year) plus, it's also a very strong 2:i also. 58% in micro is obviously not ideal, but if this was this last academic year, they'll likely cut a bit more slack than usual (there's also an option to ask them to consider mitigating circs, if you feel your university hasn't accounted for them - there should be a link on the course home page) and also, one grade that's somewhat lower than your normal range doesn't really count for too much - if we see something like that, which is rather anomalous, we tend to assume that there was perhaps issues with the class, or one of the assessments, or you didn't gel with the tutor, or whatever: it shouldn't, on its own, prevent you from being considered.

I realise you have to invest (most likely, anyway, unless you are exempt) £75 in applying -but if you were my student, with that profile, I'd be strongly suggesting you consider it, and coming from LSE will also improve your chances too, as it's known to be very strong in economics in particular, for obvious reasons. Worst case scenario, they don't accept you - you can then reapply with your First Class degree next autumn, and take a year out to stash the cash in preparation, or go somewhere else in September (maybe even stay on at LSE?) instead.
Just wondering, what do you think my chances are for getting into the MSc Economics course at LSE. i.e. do you think I have a better chance since I'm doing my undergrad at LSE than say Oxbridge?
0
reply
__Khaleesi
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by BasicMistake)
What are your options? Basically you need to demonstrate that you are comfortable with economics despite not doing a pure economics degree.
I have a lot of economics options. Basically, international, monetary, political economy, public, developmental etc.

Just wondering, what do you think my chances are for getting into the MSc Economics course at LSE. i.e. do you think I have a better chance since I'm doing my undergrad at LSE than say Oxbridge?
0
reply
BasicMistake
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by __Khaleesi)
I have a lot of economics options. Basically, international, monetary, political economy, public, developmental etc.

Just wondering, what do you think my chances are for getting into the MSc Economics course at LSE. i.e. do you think I have a better chance since I'm doing my undergrad at LSE than say Oxbridge?
I wouldn't do political economy since it's not really economics. You want to show you can solve economic models, micro or macro, so international, monetary and public are all good. Development will likely be heavily essay-based which you already have a lot of.

I can't speak for LSE admissions. For better or for worse they will be more familiar with your current degree and the context of your performance.
0
reply
econhelp525
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by __Khaleesi)
Thank you so much for this response. I’ll definitely apply to LSE, Cam, and Oxford. Do you have any thoughts on whether similar programs at say Durham, St Andrew’s and UCL are worth exploring?
UCL, yes but expensive.

St Andrews and Durham are great universities, but their undergraduate reputation doesn't carry onto postgraduate. I don't know how good their research would be for a Masters, it depends on where they allocate their money. I'd stay away from St Andrews. Too small, too little money, I don't think a Masters from there is worth it.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (18)
7.41%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (37)
15.23%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (43)
17.7%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (35)
14.4%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (63)
25.93%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (47)
19.34%

Watched Threads

View All