mil2004
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Hi,
What sort of topics should I read up on for the lnat essay section?
Is it usually based on typical ethics questions like abortion, euthanasia etc?
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McGinger
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The questions change every year and you will be given a couple of titles at random to choose from - you wont know what these will be, and since no prior knowledge is required for LNAT, you can't realistically 'read up ' on anything specific.

Yes, there may be a question on drug use, human rights, capital punishment etc - but it wont be 'tell me everything you know about the death penalty', it will be 'Do you think the death penalty is justified in the case of...' child murder, the death of a policeman, mass terrorism, hijacking, or whatever. The point is that they want to you to answer that specific question - ie. why is it more justified (or less) in this specific case. Its equally possible that there may be no question on any of these 'expected' topics - or that you might not be offered one of them. I have read plenty of otherwise good LNAT essays that simple didn't answer the specific question posed. Its the quickest way to get a low mark. So read the question carefully and make sure you address the 'deeper' question (ie. why is the death of a child, a policemen etc more heinous than any other death, and thereby deserves a higher punishment?).

There may be questions about issues currently in the news - as an example, when there were cases about 'turning off a child's life support but the parent's object' going through the courts, there was a carefully worded question on that issue. Its possible there may, for instance, be ethical questions about countries sharing vaccines/drug advances, or whether any government has the moral duty to protect its population from disease regardless of the cost etc etc - or any other 'current issue'.

What LNAT essay questions are designed to do is a) see of you can work out what specific area/moral dilemma you are being asked about, b) that you can show that you understand there are two sides to that argument/question/situation and can briefly explain these, c) you can write in clear, grammatically correct English whilst under pressure. Its not a test of legal knowledge, or advanced moral reasoning.
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mil2004
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(Original post by McGinger)
The questions change every year and you will be given a couple of titles at random to choose from - you wont know what these will be, and since no prior knowledge is required for LNAT, you can't realistically 'read up ' on anything specific.

Yes, there may be a question on drug use, human rights, capital punishment etc - but it wont be 'tell me everything you know about the death penalty', it will be 'Do you think the death penalty is justified in the case of...' child murder, the death of a policeman, mass terrorism, hijacking, or whatever. The point is that they want to you to answer that specific question - ie. why is it more justified (or less) in this specific case. Its equally possible that there may be no question on any of these 'expected' topics - or that you might not be offered one of them. I have read plenty of otherwise good LNAT essays that simple didn't answer the specific question posed. Its the quickest way to get a low mark. So read the question carefully and make sure you address the 'deeper' question (ie. why is the death of a child, a policemen etc more heinous than any other death, and thereby deserves a higher punishment?).

There may be questions about issues currently in the news - as an example, when there were cases about 'turning off a child's life support but the parent's object' going through the courts, there was a carefully worded question on that issue. Its possible there may, for instance, be ethical questions about countries sharing vaccines/drug advances, or whether any government has the moral duty to protect its population from disease regardless of the cost etc etc - or any other 'current issue'.

What LNAT essay questions are designed to do is a) see of you can work out what specific area/moral dilemma you are being asked about, b) that you can show that you understand there are two sides to that argument/question/situation and can briefly explain these, c) you can write in clear, grammatically correct English whilst under pressure. Its not a test of legal knowledge, or advanced moral reasoning.
This is incredibly helpful! Thank you so much for the advice.
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