ap_00
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I am a second year law undergraduate and aspiring solicitor. Today I received my results which were very poor, and am now considering resitting my second year.

To provide context, the course of the year I have struggled greatly with my mental health and have always found certain areas of learning difficult. Recently, I have received a diagnosis of Dyslexia and I am also in the process of waiting for an appointment to evaluate as to whether I have Bipolar Disorder. These two factors in conjunction with the overall affect of the pandemic and problems within my personal life has led to less than ideal exam performances.

My only worry now is that if I were to resit the year as I know I am capable of achieving stronger grades, will this affect my chances of securing a training contract in the future and am unsure how firms generally view students resitting the entire year at university.

Thank you in advance😊
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Gmaster1980
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I had a scan through your old posts and, between the issues you mention in those and your current poor academics, you're chances are currently pretty slim to none for training contracts in commercial law, and fairly low in other practice areas as well.
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ap_00
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(Original post by Gmaster1980)
I had a scan through your old posts and, between the issues you mention in those and your current poor academics, you're chances are currently pretty slim to none for training contracts in commercial law, and fairly low in other practice areas as well.
Is there anything constructive that you can say that would help in my situation that I can take on board as I am aware that prior grades will be a future hurdle when applying for training contracts, I.e, resits, mitigating circumstances and or work experience.
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Gmaster1980
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(Original post by ap_00)
Is there anything constructive that you can say that would help in my situation that I can take on board as I am aware that prior grades will be a future hurdle when applying for training contracts, I.e, resits, mitigating circumstances and or work experience.
Honestly? You haven't had a single decent grade your entire academic career and it's doubtful you'll be able to do anything to make up for it without several years of very high achievement in every area of your CV. Mitigating circumstances and resits can only go so far.

If you are looking at academically selective firms your chances are zero unless you can somehow get straight 80s in your modules in the future and even that might not be enough. What firms are you interested in?
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Catherine1973
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Are you allowed to resit? We are not unless we totally fail something.
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ap_00
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I had spoken to the Student Wellbeing 3 months before my exams were scheduled. Their response was that due to the pandemic I had to wait a long time for those appointments and should continue to sit the exams as originally scheduled. It was not until after my exams that I was able to receive a screening, and I am currently on a waiting list regarding my mental health. In hindsight, the best option for me would have been to take a year out before commencing my second year. In regards to student finance, I have spoken to the Student Wellbeing team who have informed me that I may be able to claim compelling reasons surrounding my student finance.
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law_dreamitdoit
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Hey there,I'm sorry the advice you've received so far has been more of an attack than anything helpful or even remotely positive.I'm in the first year of my LLB at the age of 30, due to the health problems and disabilities I've got and the impact they've had on me over the years. I received all Firsts for my first semester and 2/3 Firsts in second. But my 6th module I only scored 48% - I am devastated, but have had a lot going on and new illnesses creeping up - I began having severe seizures in January, up to 40 per day, and have been diagnosed with functional neurological disorder (although it totally feels like a dysfunctional neurological disorder haha!). Anyway, my point is I, too, was only spoken to about deferring my exams AFTER I'd sat them. I had PEC's (Personal Extenuating Circumstances) and late submissions approved for them, but deferral wasn't mentioned to me until a meeting with the student support team and my personal tutor where they decided to inform me I could've deferred my Contract module (the one I got a 3rd for). I mean, would've been nice to know that BEFORE I submitted it, but at least I know going forwards.My advice to you would be to defer all of your studies for a year - take a year out just to focus on yourself and your health, get things under control and to a manageable level before coming back to complete the rest of your studies. Hopefully by then you'll have learned some coping mechanisms to help you better control your illnesses under stress and pressure. Alternatively, you could have a look into going down the Apprenticeship route, or CILEX. I'm led to believe these aren't as draining as you undertake them over a longer period (that's also something else you could do - drop down to part time, or study through the Open University). All of these things are things you could do to mitigate your circumstances and give you a chance to build yourself back better and hopefully smash it out of the park when finals come around! If you took a year out, you could explain this away as a gap year to prospective employers, or tell them the difficulties you were faced with and explain how you'll have developed resilience and determination to come back stronger a year later, more focused and with a better handle on your ill health. Deferrals aren't looked upon negatively to law firms if you can explain the why, when, what happened and how it helped you improve. It's the same with most things, if you can develop strategies to help you do better, you're developing transferrable skills which are highly appreciated in Law. Yes, going off your results etc so far, it's likely that you will struggle to get into the top firms, but that goes for about 95% of people reading Law anyway. Your chances will be better if you take heed of some of the advice offered to you and focus on smaller high street firms once it comes time to focus on your career steps (which, if you decide to continue with your studies, you also need to be really focusing on now, things like getting vacation schemes and mini pupillages etc!). I hope at least some of this helps you and that things get better for you in the not too distant future. I wish you all the best. Above all else, take care of yourself.
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ap_00
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(Original post by law_dreamitdoit)
Hey there,I'm sorry the advice you've received so far has been more of an attack than anything helpful or even remotely positive.I'm in the first year of my LLB at the age of 30, due to the health problems and disabilities I've got and the impact they've had on me over the years. I received all Firsts for my first semester and 2/3 Firsts in second. But my 6th module I only scored 48% - I am devastated, but have had a lot going on and new illnesses creeping up - I began having severe seizures in January, up to 40 per day, and have been diagnosed with functional neurological disorder (although it totally feels like a dysfunctional neurological disorder haha!). Anyway, my point is I, too, was only spoken to about deferring my exams AFTER I'd sat them. I had PEC's (Personal Extenuating Circumstances) and late submissions approved for them, but deferral wasn't mentioned to me until a meeting with the student support team and my personal tutor where they decided to inform me I could've deferred my Contract module (the one I got a 3rd for). I mean, would've been nice to know that BEFORE I submitted it, but at least I know going forwards.My advice to you would be to defer all of your studies for a year - take a year out just to focus on yourself and your health, get things under control and to a manageable level before coming back to complete the rest of your studies. Hopefully by then you'll have learned some coping mechanisms to help you better control your illnesses under stress and pressure. Alternatively, you could have a look into going down the Apprenticeship route, or CILEX. I'm led to believe these aren't as draining as you undertake them over a longer period (that's also something else you could do - drop down to part time, or study through the Open University). All of these things are things you could do to mitigate your circumstances and give you a chance to build yourself back better and hopefully smash it out of the park when finals come around! If you took a year out, you could explain this away as a gap year to prospective employers, or tell them the difficulties you were faced with and explain how you'll have developed resilience and determination to come back stronger a year later, more focused and with a better handle on your ill health. Deferrals aren't looked upon negatively to law firms if you can explain the why, when, what happened and how it helped you improve. It's the same with most things, if you can develop strategies to help you do better, you're developing transferrable skills which are highly appreciated in Law. Yes, going off your results etc so far, it's likely that you will struggle to get into the top firms, but that goes for about 95% of people reading Law anyway. Your chances will be better if you take heed of some of the advice offered to you and focus on smaller high street firms once it comes time to focus on your career steps (which, if you decide to continue with your studies, you also need to be really focusing on now, things like getting vacation schemes and mini pupillages etc!). I hope at least some of this helps you and that things get better for you in the not too distant future. I wish you all the best. Above all else, take care of yourself.
Hi there, thank you for your help it has been really useful. I’m sorry to hear about the difficulties you are facing in your personal life as well and I wish you all the best! I intend to speak to the law school at my university to see if it is possible to resit the year as by the time I go back to university I would have had a good 8 months reflecting on my health and I feel as though I can do much better. In my assignments this year I attained 2:1 grades in Land and Criminal, a 2:2 in EU, a 3rd in Company Law and I did not submit my assignment for Financial Services due to illness at the time. It was in my exams where I failed and felt as though I can do far better if I resit the year as opposed to resisting them in August whilst I’m getting my mental wellbeing back on track. In regards to law firms, I know my grades aren’t good enough for magic circle firms such as DLA Piper and Freshfields, so I have been looking at both high street and regional firms with the largest being Irwin Mitchell. Again, thank you for your help I have taken this on board and am grateful.
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petertyerman
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you need to read the equality act advice ti higher education https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/...gher-education
As you diagnosis means you are disabled under the equality act and universities and future employers are required to make reasonable adjustments.
resitting a year or extending course and allowing resits of affected results, because results are affected by unsupported disability can be an adjustment( in my view meets the reasonableness test). I know universities have done it before with no additional fees.You should approach disability support to recommend to law school this adjustment do no do that formally request as reasonable adjustment.
also know a emminant barrister who stated they would see succeeding in law exams with a disability a large +ve in an application and might overcome less than ideal results pre diagnosis.
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