Bakugo27
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a sailing dinghy is blown across an estuary by a northerly wind exerting a force of 2500. At the same time, a water current acts on the dinghy with a force of 1000N in a westerly direction. What is the resultant force acting on the dingy?
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Stonebridge
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(Original post by Bakugo27)
a sailing dinghy is blown across an estuary by a northerly wind exerting a force of 2500. At the same time, a water current acts on the dinghy with a force of 1000N in a westerly direction. What is the resultant force acting on the dingy?
Do you know how to add vectors?
If 'no' you are missing the theory component for this.

If 'yes'
You have 2 forces acting on an object and are given the magnitude of both and the fact that they are acting in two directions at right angles, North/south and east/west. Draw the vector diagram. Pythagoras is your friend here.
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Bakugo27
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(Original post by Stonebridge)
Do you know how to add vectors?
If 'no' you are missing the theory component for this.

If 'yes'
You have 2 forces acting on an object and are given the magnitude of both and the fact that they are acting in two directions at right angles, North/south and east/west. Draw the vector diagram. Pythagoras is your friend here.
i got the answer 2639N which is correct but I don't understand why the angle is 338 degrees and not 22 degrees
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Stonebridge
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(Original post by Bakugo27)
i got the answer 2639N which is correct but I don't understand why the angle is 338 degrees and not 22 degrees
It's just a matter of where you measure the angle from. You are correct so long as you are clear where the angle is. What line you are measuring it to.
In directions where you talk about north/south/east/west - it's usual to measure an angle (called a bearing) clockwise round the circle starting in the northerly direction.
So your angle of 22 degs is to the west of north. If you start at north and go round clockwise, you go 338 degrees.
That's what's happened here.
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Bakugo27
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(Original post by Stonebridge)
It's just a matter of where you measure the angle from. You are correct so long as you are clear where the angle is. What line you are measuring it to.
In directions where you talk about north/south/east/west - it's usual to measure an angle (called a bearing) clockwise round the circle starting in the northerly direction.
So your angle of 22 degs is to the west of north. If you start at north and go round clockwise, you go 338 degrees.
That's what's happened here.
Thanks
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