。・゚゚・freya・゚゚・。
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I want to study French ( which i'm doing as an A-Level) with two other languages. either german, spanish, portuguese or another language, im undecided. but i don't know if i can because i only do one language a-level. at all the unis ive looked at, this is not possible. does anyone know where/ if i would be able to do this?
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Saracen's Fez
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I don't know of anywhere that lets you pick up two beginners' languages as part of doing three main languages as part of your degree.

What might be possible is to pick up a third language as a module or something later on. I know Cambridge lets you do this with certain languages, and I'd be surprised if they were alone in that.
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。・゚゚・freya・゚゚・。
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Oh ok, thank you. I think I got a bit confused then. I know that at Edinburgh you can do Portuguese, Basque and Catalan. So I was thinking unis like that
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Interea
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You're probably looking for degrees called "BA Modern Languages", although you're right that most only let you do one beginner language. Sheffield offer this degree, which specifically says that you can do two languages from scratch: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/slc/unde...s-and-cultures

Newcastle's website is a bit confusing (at a skim read it seems like you can maybe do one beginner language in year 1, and then potentially pick up another in year 2, or at least have some more flexibility than other language degrees), so that might also be worth a proper look/email to find out. https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/degrees/t901/

Alternatively, some two language degrees will have optional modules to do a beginners language (these modules are usually available for people across a range of degrees, not just languages), so your degree title would be "French and German" (for example), but you'd also be able to take a couple of, say, Spanish modules. It may be worth looking at two language degrees for French and a beginner language and looking at if optional extra language modules are possible
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bluemoon03
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As well as Sheffield, I'm pretty sure Birmingham also lets you do two from scratch. Interea is also correct in talking about optional third language modules - out of the unis I applied for, Lancaster and Cambridge definitely let you do this (Lancaster as a minor subject in first year and Cambridge as an optional paper in second year)
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SirNoodles
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The University of Sheffield is notorious for their 3-language degree program which allows you to pick up even 2 at beginners' level. They offer 10 languages with some interesting ones ranging from the classic French, Spanish and German to more "unusual" languages such as Dutch, Czech and Luxembourgish (although, as niche as it sounds, I personally doubt its usefulness).

At Nottingham you can only pick 2 languages if you've only studied 1 at A-Level but if you were to pick up Spanish that would also include a year of Portuguese, giving you the chance to pick that up.

But to be honest, most universities tend to give you the option to pick up one language from scratch as it's a difficult process and picking up two at a time could hinder your progress in each language which is why it is generally not recommendable. For me, though, it's completely down to the individual as some people can handle two languages from scratch whereas others would struggle.

Good luck with your studies
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sunshinehss
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I remember visiting Sheffield for an open day (pre-corona, lol) and them advertising 3 languages as an option. So I'd defo contact them and look into that. Good luck xx
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by SirNoodles)
But to be honest, most universities tend to give you the option to pick up one language from scratch as it's a difficult process and picking up two at a time could hinder your progress in each language which is why it is generally not recommendable. For me, though, it's completely down to the individual as some people can handle two languages from scratch whereas others would struggle.
Yep, I'd definitely second this. From personal experience, if your aim is fluency in your languages then you need to put a lot of time into learning one beginner's language, and that's not really something anyone could do to the same extent with two at once I don't think, unless they had an incredible natural gift for it.

Of course picking up a third language later into your studies than first year is a different matter.
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。・゚゚・freya・゚゚・。
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Thanks everyone. It’s all been very help. I think I need to definitely look at Sheffield and Nottingham. And maybe email some unis.
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Newcastle University Ambassador
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(Original post by 。・゚゚・freya・゚゚・。)
I want to study French ( which i'm doing as an A-Level) with two other languages. either german, spanish, portuguese or another language, im undecided. but i don't know if i can because i only do one language a-level. at all the unis ive looked at, this is not possible. does anyone know where/ if i would be able to do this?
Hello!

As @Interea mentioned, Newcastle University offers a 4 year BA Modern Languages programme that allows you to study up to 3 languages including French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese and Japanese. They have entry level and intermediate modules for all of the above mentioned languages in Stage 1, and you are allowed 3 language modules in your first year along with some modules on the history and culture of their respective countries. In Stage 2, there is an Introduction to Catalan module as well, if that is something you are interested in. To enroll, you will require an ABB-BBB, including French, German or Spanish.
If you require more information, you can check out the course page here: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...courseoverview
Or you can chat with a current student via the Unibuddy platform here: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/study/contact/unibuddy/

Hope this helps!
Nikhita
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cchloepx
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St Andrews is the only uni I know of that allows 3 languages like that. Although I’m not sure if you need to have more than one qualification in languages then.

Personally I think joint honours is better. Allows you to immerse yourself in the language better. Most unis only do 1 year abroad, even with joint honours languages. You can either go abroad to another country in summer or for a term the year after your YA.

But if it’s right for you then do 3!
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University of Birmingham
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(Original post by 。・゚゚・freya・゚゚・。)
I want to study French ( which i'm doing as an A-Level) with two other languages. either german, spanish, portuguese or another language, im undecided. but i don't know if i can because i only do one language a-level. at all the unis ive looked at, this is not possible. does anyone know where/ if i would be able to do this?
bluemoon03 is correct, you can study three languages here at Birmingham with only 1 A level.

Our only stipulation in this situation is that one of your beginner languages must be either French or Spanish, so you could study French/Spanish/German or French/Spanish/Portuguese for example. You can have a look at any other combinations of interest on MyChoices.

I understand that some people might be apprehensive about studying three languages with two from scratch, however this is an incredibly popular option here at Birmingham so you would be in good company. Its worth remembering that the three language pathway will be 120 credits, exactly the same as if you were studying one or two languages. Although this may be challenging in some aspects you will study the same amount of credits, this will just be spread over more languages. And if you find that you don't like it you can always drop down to two languages in your second year so you haven't got much to lose really

I hope this helps but if you have any more questions just let us know! - Molly
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