Should I feel ashamed that I'm 22 and never worked before?

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Anonymous #1
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As above
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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I don't think you necessarily need to. It is a bit more unusual in this country (and certainly not that advisable) but you're not the only one. I'd never had an internship or part-time job or anything until I finished my undergrad and started my Masters, aged 22! :nah: That said, I had done a fair bit of volunteering at my uni, and had had positions of responsibility at uni So I was quite easily able to blag my way into (unpaid) internships

Don't waste time feeling ashamed. Shame is not the most productive emotion on the planet and can have a tendency to stall people. Focus on building up your CV asap - that is far more important :yep:
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username5809044
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(Original post by Anonymous)
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Not at all
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
I don't think you necessarily need to. It is a bit more unusual in this country (and certainly not that advisable) but you're not the only one. I'd never had an internship or part-time job or anything until I finished my undergrad and started my Masters, aged 22! :nah: That said, I had done a fair bit of volunteering at my uni, and had had positions of responsibility at uni So I was quite easily able to blag my way into (unpaid) internships

Don't waste time feeling ashamed. Shame is not the most productive emotion on the planet and can have a tendency to stall people. Focus on building up your CV asap - that is far more important :yep:
Thanks. I don't really feel ashamed. It's more that I feel like I should be because of society/family's views

There's nothing shameful to me about being in my early twenties and still doing my degree and not working yet. We have literally our whole lives to work. Working is not something people want to do. It's something we have to do. So if I don't need the extra money from working right now then I don't see the need to. Except for the experience.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Alexis55)
Not at all
Thanks Why do you think it isn't something shameful?
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks. I don't really feel ashamed. It's more that I feel like I should be because of society/family's views

There's nothing shameful to me about being in my early twenties and still doing my degree and not working yet. We have literally our whole lives to work. Working is not something people want to do. It's something we have to do. So if I don't need the extra money from working right now then I don't see the need to. Except for the experience.
So long as your CV/future job prospects aren't suffering, I don't see how it's a problem or anyone else's business! :nah:
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CoolCavy
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No, my first job was when i was 21.

Society now wants you to have work experience to get work and you can't get work experience without a job. Very few employers are willing to take a chance on you anymore unless there is nepotism from a friend or relative involved.

The people at my school who had jobs when they were teenagers got them through the connections of their parents. It's unfair if you have a very small or estranged family.

University placements are also stacked against you unless you come from a wealthy family or have a huge maintenance loan you can save for the unpaid year. This was the main reason i didnt do a placement year, the majority were unpaid and i could not afford that.

I would try to take up some form of volunteering, people can laugh at being a VT on here but its actually given me a lot of transferable skills that helped me get my first job. That and an open minded manager who could see my potential.

I had to start at the bottom due to my lack of work experience but within 8 months i have managed to work myself up into a graduate position, i class those 8 months as effectively my placement year just after graduation.
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Final Fantasy
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Yes. I would feel ashamed if I was unemployed at that age (unless still at university full-time). But everyone has different standards.
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 1 month ago
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
No, my first job was when i was 21.

Society now wants you to have work experience to get work and you can't get work experience without a job. Very few employers are willing to take a chance on you anymore unless there is nepotism from a friend or relative involved.

The people at my school who had jobs when they were teenagers got them through the connections of their parents. It's unfair if you have a very small or estranged family.

University placements are also stacked against you unless you come from a wealthy family or have a huge maintenance loan you can save for the unpaid year. This was the main reason i didnt do a placement year, the majority were unpaid and i could not afford that.

I would try to take up some form of volunteering, people can laugh at being a VT on here but its actually given me a lot of transferable skills that helped me get my first job. That and an open minded manager who could see my potential.

I had to start at the bottom due to my lack of work experience but within 8 months i have managed to work myself up into a graduate position, i class those 8 months as effectively my placement year just after graduation.
What you said about being from a very small/estranged family is very relevant to me and my family. I don't have the stronger chance of getting a job through 'connections' like so many people do, which I see as quite unfair.

I am interested in starting with volunteering and will likely take it up soon

Really happy for you in how you've worked your way up : )
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NonIndigenous
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Different people have different priorities and standards. Provided that you're generally being a useful person, there's nothing to be ashamed of.

If you're doing a degree, on a student loan + with some assistance from your parents which means you don't need an extra job to sustain yourself... that is fine. Provided you're actually doing the degree and not dossing around getting and laid every weekend instead of studying.

That's what I mean. If you're a generally useful person, you shouldn't be ashamed. Your time to find a full-time and meaningful job will come. Why work for £10/hour in a supermarket doing relatively menial work that contributes little to your personal development, if you can invest that time instead in yourself and get a better job by the end of your studies as a result.

Priorities. If you needed the money, you would do it. But you don't. It may make some others jealous but that's none of their business anyway.
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
The people at my school who had jobs when they were teenagers got them through the connections of their parents. It's unfair if you have a very small or estranged family.
This is extremely fking disappointing. I am half Polish. This kind of culture is absolutely rife over there.

I'm disappointed it is becoming more prevalent in the UK now too. I have consistently heard from older people that this did not used to be the case. People from actual 'hard' backgrounds, who had to carve their own way, instead of relying on influential family members or connections. Most of them have sons or daughters, who are facing problems which they never faced themselves in the job market. You could walk into a store, or pub, hand them your CV, and voila. You weren't always successful, obviously, but it you didn't have to on the other hand send your CV out to 30-50 different places just to get 1 or 2 interviews.
Last edited by NonIndigenous; 1 month ago
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StriderHort
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Kinda, yeah. You sure shouldn't be proud of it.
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londonmyst
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Depends on your health, what you have been doing with your time instead of working and your capabilities.

Nothing to be ashamed of if you have been: studying, volunteering, widening your skillset or expanding your social circle and contacts book.
But plenty to be ashamed of if you've been involved in: assaulting people, criminal damage, drug dealing, football hooliganism, revenge porn, sending unsolicited explicit pics to random strangers or playing video games for 10-15 hours a day while subsidized by the welfare system.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Depends on your health, what you have been doing with your time instead of working and your capabilities.

Nothing to be ashamed of if you have been: studying, volunteering, widening your skillset or expanding your social circle and contacts book.
But plenty to be ashamed of if you've been involved in: assaulting people, criminal damage, drug dealing, football hooliganism, revenge porn, sending unsolicited explicit pics to random strangers or playing video games for 10-15 hours a day while subsidized by the welfare system.
In fairness, drug dealing is work and deffo expands your social circle and contacts book
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londonmyst
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(Original post by StriderHort)
In fairness, drug dealing is work and deffo expands your social circle and contacts book
I'm not including weight loss teas, botox or viagra under the drug dealing classification. :eviltongue:
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username5809044
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks Why do you think it isn't something shameful?
bcz its sth that isnt btw ur hands ,you can try to find a part time job ,also ,there re some side effects that leave other ppl unable to work or find one, No one ever can blame you if doesnt know ur conditions
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Smeraldettoi
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(Original post by Anonymous)
As above
Take life at your own pace; not the pace of others
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Smeraldettoi)
Take life at your own pace; not the pace of others
Thanks. To put things into a little more perspective, in the couple of years after leaving school at 18 I was dealing with not good mental health, so working was the least of my concerns.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
Different people have different priorities and standards. Provided that you're generally being a useful person, there's nothing to be ashamed of.

If you're doing a degree, on a student loan + with some assistance from your parents which means you don't need an extra job to sustain yourself... that is fine. Provided you're actually doing the degree and not dossing around getting and laid every weekend instead of studying.

That's what I mean. If you're a generally useful person, you shouldn't be ashamed. Your time to find a full-time and meaningful job will come. Why work for £10/hour in a supermarket doing relatively menial work that contributes little to your personal development, if you can invest that time instead in yourself and get a better job by the end of your studies as a result.

Priorities. If you needed the money, you would do it. But you don't. It may make some others jealous but that's none of their business anyway.
Thank you!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by StriderHort)
Kinda, yeah. You sure shouldn't be proud of it.
I'm not proud of it
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