Maninka
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
This question is addressed to people with knowledge of Arabic countries and cultures.
I’m a non-Arabic-speaking Muslim who would like to study the Arabic language in order to take a degree in Islamic studies. I’m willing to go abroad (from the UK) to learn the language.
Given my objective, which country or university would be best? (I know that Arabic comes in multiple dialects)
Thank you for your well-considered answer.
To the idle malcontents: please spare me your snide comments.
0
reply
ROTL94
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Arabia, same as how the best place to learn English is in England, and the best place to learn German is in Germany and so on.
Last edited by ROTL94; 1 month ago
0
reply
lara147
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Maninka)
This question is addressed to people with knowledge of Arabic countries and cultures.
I’m a non-Arabic-speaking Muslim who would like to study the Arabic language in order to take a degree in Islamic studies. I’m willing to go abroad (from the UK) to learn the language.
Given my objective, which country or university would be best? (I know that Arabic comes in multiple dialects)
Thank you for your well-considered answer.
To the idle malcontents: please spare me your snide comments.
Egypt by far is the best. It’s very diverse there’s Muslims, Christians and Jews living together with no issues. People are very friendly and will talk to you so it will be easier to pick it up. Also there’s a lot of Islamic unis/school that you can chose from. Parts of the country also have many foreigners from Europe including UK so you’ll find people that are like you. One thing is though SA rates are high esp in certain areas so you might want to do your research about that.
0
reply
idonthaveaname1223
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Defo Egypt!!! Plus I like their dialect the most
0
reply
Anonbro1
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
I too would say Egypt, considering the presence of Al-Azhar university in Cairo.
0
reply
Aliyah1981
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by ROTL94)
Arabia, same as how the best place to learn English is in England, and the best place to learn German is in Germany and so on.
Lol Arabia is not a country
1
reply
Aliyah1981
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Maninka)
This question is addressed to people with knowledge of Arabic countries and cultures.
I’m a non-Arabic-speaking Muslim who would like to study the Arabic language in order to take a degree in Islamic studies. I’m willing to go abroad (from the UK) to learn the language.
Given my objective, which country or university would be best? (I know that Arabic comes in multiple dialects)
Thank you for your well-considered answer.
To the idle malcontents: please spare me your snide comments.
I went to Syria to learn ten years ago. Shame you can’t go there - the dialect is beautiful. Also if you go to Egypt their accent is totally different from other Arabs! But yeah that’s probably a good choice if you’re a male. If you’re female I would recommend somewhere like Bahrain
1
reply
ROTL94
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Aliyah1981)
Lol Arabia is not a country
Aye, it is, Saudi Arabia.
0
reply
summerbirdreads
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Maninka)
This question is addressed to people with knowledge of Arabic countries and cultures.
I’m a non-Arabic-speaking Muslim who would like to study the Arabic language in order to take a degree in Islamic studies. I’m willing to go abroad (from the UK) to learn the language.
Given my objective, which country or university would be best? (I know that Arabic comes in multiple dialects)
Thank you for your well-considered answer.
To the idle malcontents: please spare me your snide comments.
First some background info: As someone living in UAE (Dubai as everyone thinks this country is Dubai) I can tell you that despite this technically being an Arabic country majority of the people doesn't speak Arabic this is due to the fact that most of the people hear are not actually Arabs but expats from various different countries (mostly South Asia) so even though we learn Arabic in school (in a second language level) it only enables us to read and write in Arabic along with some basic grammar that you can't apply in a real life situation, this applies to all of the GCC countries as well including Saudi Arabia. So the language mostly spoken and encouraged to speak is English as so many people from different countries have to speak something so even Arabs are encouraged to speak English (quite annoying tbh) and the other language mostly spoken are Urdu/Hindi and Arabic with Arabs. So to learn Arabic I suggest you don't come to GCC but go to Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon etc.. Yemen would've been an excellent choice but well don't go there.

But if you want to go to university for Islamic degree the kind of Arabic you need to learn is actually not the speaking kind, more like a literary kind. My friend who goes to Sharjah University for Islamic degree ( one of the best for islamic) did not know Arabic but she learned it online for uni, so her Arabic is perfect for uni but she struggles to hold a conversation in Arabic but she prefers it that way since she doesn't want to mix up literary formal Arabic with the local style local people speak here which is actually heavy in the usage of slangs, she says the difference is like Shakespearean language and internet slang. So learning a local dialect of Arabic won't help you much in Uni. I also know a person who goes to Umm Ul Qura (Mecca) who had the same experience and many local Arabic people struggles to understand the formal kind literary kind of Arabic. So learning a colloquial Arabic won't really help you...
1
reply
SpaceLover29
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
Can I ask how old you are? Arabic is a challenging language to learn and will take a lot of time and effort to get to an understandable level.
0
reply
Aliyah1981
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
I did wonder if you meant that hehe I used to live there and only heard people shorten it to Saudi :-) ROTL94
Last edited by Aliyah1981; 1 month ago
0
reply
Aliyah1981
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by summerbirdreads)
First some background info: As someone living in UAE (Dubai as everyone thinks this country is Dubai) I can tell you that despite this technically being an Arabic country majority of the people doesn't speak Arabic this is due to the fact that most of the people hear are not actually Arabs but expats from various different countries (mostly South Asia) so even though we learn Arabic in school (in a second language level) it only enables us to read and write in Arabic along with some basic grammar that you can't apply in a real life situation, this applies to all of the GCC countries as well including Saudi Arabia. So the language mostly spoken and encouraged to speak is English as so many people from different countries have to speak something so even Arabs are encouraged to speak English (quite annoying tbh) and the other language mostly spoken are Urdu/Hindi and Arabic with Arabs. So to learn Arabic I suggest you don't come to GCC but go to Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon etc.. Yemen would've been an excellent choice but well don't go there.

But if you want to go to university for Islamic degree the kind of Arabic you need to learn is actually not the speaking kind, more like a literary kind. My friend who goes to Sharjah University for Islamic degree ( one of the best for islamic) did not know Arabic but she learned it online for uni, so her Arabic is perfect for uni but she struggles to hold a conversation in Arabic but she prefers it that way since she doesn't want to mix up literary formal Arabic with the local style local people speak here which is actually heavy in the usage of slangs, she says the difference is like Shakespearean language and internet slang. So learning a local dialect of Arabic won't help you much in Uni. I also know a person who goes to Umm Ul Qura (Mecca) who had the same experience and many local Arabic people struggles to understand the formal kind literary kind of Arabic. So learning a colloquial Arabic won't really help you...
Yeah true - formal Arabic for religious purposes is completely different to colloquial Arabic

Jordan is also a nice choice. I don’t recommend lebanon for language learning as the Arabic is mixed with French which might confuse you even more
Last edited by Aliyah1981; 1 month ago
0
reply
Anonbro1
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Aliyah1981)
I did wonder if you meant that hehe I used to live there and only heard people shorten it to Saudi :-) ROTL94
Saudi sounds royal.
0
reply
Aliyah1981
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Anonbro1)
Saudi sounds royal.
Hehe I guess it does ☺️
0
reply
zj215
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
I suggest you go to exeter do one of their combination degrees or single honours degrees in arabic, you'll get a good foundation in arabic (formal) which you'll need. There is no point in learning dialect if you want to do formal islamic studies later on. They also do various courses in islamic studies as an academic subject, you might be able to combine islamic studies with Arabic depending on your options. They also do an advanced degree programme in Arabic. Students go to Qassid in Jordan (Qassid is the name of the institution). Qassid also has an online programme also if you do not intend to pursue the degree route. When choosing your course, you need to ask how good a teacher are they, it's not enough just to speak arabic. Leeds and SOAS also have good reputations for teaching arabic (from memory). There is a huge debate about colloquial v formal, you are clear you want to learn for study of islamic text. If you just want to go to egypt for holiday, learn egyptian but you do not. I suggest Fusha / formal arabic. Don't do (or only do) Egyptian etc, it's common because of the film industry. You need formal teaching at least initially then you can add a bit of dialect in.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (6)
4.41%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (23)
16.91%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (24)
17.65%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (19)
13.97%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (40)
29.41%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (24)
17.65%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed