LividOwl9
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I’m sure that the differences are negligible after Oxbridge, but tbh I’m not able to visit any and I’m not really sure how I feel about certain factors ( eg London vs not London, campus vs city) I’m just not sure which side I fall on each of those. I love London, but I’m not married to it. One of my siblings went to a campus, the other a city and they both had a great time so.

My narrowing down is mostly being based on rankings, and the potential to work in a legal career in London, I’m 80% sure I want to work as a solicitor. For reference, I am predicted 3 A*, have decent GCSEs, volunteered with citizens advice, and am doing an pew on law.

So naturally Oxbridge tops the list, I will probably apply to Cambridge. Then some of Bristol, LSE/KCL/UCL, SOAS, Exeter, Durham, Nottingham. Do these seem about right? What order would you put these in for reputation in law?

Secondly is it a bad idea to apply only to these unis? Like, how competitive is law really, would it be a bad idea not to apply to some some slightly lower ranked unis?

Thanks for any help
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Tinders
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Personally, I would skip SOAS, and choose KCL out of LSE and UCL but this is very much my unqualified opinion.
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Oatmilkidk
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Cambridge
LSE
UCL
Kings
Exeter, Durham
Bristol
Notts
SOAS
(In my opinion) It depends on your predicted grades but it might be good to have 1 choice with lower entry requirements just to be safe
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camapplicant530
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LSE and UCL have virtually the same application/place ratio (18-20%, year on year). LSE probably has a bit more international cachet, but this is meaningless in the context of London law firms.

All of the others are considerably easier to get into, make of that what you will.

So between LSE and UCL I’d pick the one where it’s easier to get a first, which would be UCL by quite a bit (25% iirc year before COVID, vs. 17-18% at LSE).
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Reality Check
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(Original post by LividOwl9)
Secondly is it a bad idea to apply only to these unis? Like, how competitive is law really, would it be a bad idea not to apply to some some slightly lower ranked unis?
This depends on how confident you are of making your predicted grades. If you're fairly certain of A*AA or higher, then you might as well put six top-flight universities down as choices. There isn't much point putting a less good university down as a choice if there's no way you'd apply to it - you need to balance the risk of missing your grades and having no offers with wasting UCAS choices on easier offers which you would probably make, but wouldn't realistically ever accept.
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Alaska_Bear_25
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(Original post by LividOwl9)
I’m sure that the differences are negligible after Oxbridge, but tbh I’m not able to visit any and I’m not really sure how I feel about certain factors ( eg London vs not London, campus vs city) I’m just not sure which side I fall on each of those. I love London, but I’m not married to it. One of my siblings went to a campus, the other a city and they both had a great time so.

My narrowing down is mostly being based on rankings, and the potential to work in a legal career in London, I’m 80% sure I want to work as a solicitor. For reference, I am predicted 3 A*, have decent GCSEs, volunteered with citizens advice, and am doing an pew on law.

So naturally Oxbridge tops the list, I will probably apply to Cambridge. Then some of Bristol, LSE/KCL/UCL, SOAS, Exeter, Durham, Nottingham. Do these seem about right? What order would you put these in for reputation in law?

Secondly is it a bad idea to apply only to these unis? Like, how competitive is law really, would it be a bad idea not to apply to some some slightly lower ranked unis?

Thanks for any help
I applied to Cambridge, got A*A*A*A*A for my A level finals, had pretty good forecast grades, an amazing personal statement (you can ask them for feedback after the admission process and they'll let you know what they think), thought I did pretty well for the law test they give you as part of admission criteria, had an amazing interview (again, they told me so when they gave feedback), and still didn't get in. Idk just thought I'd let you know when you said Oxibridge. I also got 8 A*s for my IGCSEs as a reference. It might just be cause of how competitive it was this year with COVID and grades predicted without exams, but just things to keep in mind.

Also check out other top tiered Law universities such as University of Glasgow and Uni of Edinburgh too, they're still in the UK and part of the russell group of universities and I've heard they're pretty good too. Also maybe shortlist depending on whether you're willing to take the LNAT's since thats a requirement for some top universities. And also go through a few rankings by QS, or Times Education and so on.
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LividOwl9
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(Original post by Alaska_Bear_25)
I applied to Cambridge, got A*A*A*A*A for my A level finals, had pretty good forecast grades, an amazing personal statement (you can ask them for feedback after the admission process and they'll let you know what they think), thought I did pretty well for the law test they give you as part of admission criteria, had an amazing interview (again, they told me so when they gave feedback), and still didn't get in. Idk just thought I'd let you know when you said Oxibridge. I also got 8 A*s for my IGCSEs as a reference. It might just be cause of how competitive it was this year with COVID and grades predicted without exams, but just things to keep in mind.

Also check out other top tiered Law universities such as University of Glasgow and Uni of Edinburgh too, they're still in the UK and part of the russell group of universities and I've heard they're pretty good too. Also maybe shortlist depending on whether you're willing to take the LNAT's since thats a requirement for some top universities. And also go through a few rankings by QS, or Times Education and so on.
Yeah I know, Cambridge is a long shot for anybody really isn't it. But always worth a shot. What did their feedback say, with all of your stats I'd be interested to see what they made the decision on.

If I'm not wrong Scottish law degrees aren't qualifying law degrees in England. Do correct me If I am wrong though.
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camapplicant530
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(Original post by LividOwl9)
Yeah I know, Cambridge is a long shot for anybody really isn't it. But always worth a shot. Did you request feedback on your application, with all of your stats I'd be interested to see what they made the decision on.

If I'm not wrong Scottish law degrees aren't qualifying law degrees in England. Do correct me If I am wrong though.
Cambridge isn’t really a long shot with an acceptance rate of 16.67%. It’s slightly harder to get into than UCL/LSE. Also, due to the fact they interview almost everyone, you’ll have way more direct control over your own chances of success.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Alaska_Bear_25)
I applied to Cambridge, got A*A*A*A*A for my A level finals, had pretty good forecast grades, an amazing personal statement (you can ask them for feedback after the admission process and they'll let you know what they think), thought I did pretty well for the law test they give you as part of admission criteria, had an amazing interview (again, they told me so when they gave feedback), and still didn't get in. Idk just thought I'd let you know when you said Oxibridge. I also got 8 A*s for my IGCSEs as a reference. It might just be cause of how competitive it was this year with COVID and grades predicted without exams, but just things to keep in mind.

Also check out other top tiered Law universities such as University of Glasgow and Uni of Edinburgh too, they're still in the UK and part of the russell group of universities and I've heard they're pretty good too. Also maybe shortlist depending on whether you're willing to take the LNAT's since thats a requirement for some top universities. And also go through a few rankings by QS, or Times Education and so on.
5 A levels, 4 at A*
8 A* at GCSE
An 'amazing' personal statement
An 'amazing' interview...

...and you didn't receive an offer.

I wonder why?
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Alaska_Bear_25
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(Original post by LividOwl9)
Yeah I know, Cambridge is a long shot for anybody really isn't it. But always worth a shot. What did their feedback say, with all of your stats I'd be interested to see what they made the decision on.

If I'm not wrong Scottish law degrees aren't qualifying law degrees in England. Do correct me If I am wrong though.
Yea it is worth the shot which is why I applied, I was sure I'd get in with my grades and stuff, its always been a huge dream and I tried but it didnt work out. The said that my law test (the one specific to cambridge) had good points and was well phrased but it wasnt as long as some of the others. That was the only negative in all their feedback, which was hurtful since most of the guides said quality is better than quantity, so i purposefully made sure that I condensed my points and it was not unusually short, just medium length essay with all the points and possible rebuttals and such.

And yes they are qualifying in the England too. Glasgow University for instance does two law courses, one specific for scotland, and one which is Common Law which is the one that is for qualifying in England, so you can check it out too. It comes in the top law schools worldwide and I think make top 10 in the UK as well.
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Alaska_Bear_25
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(Original post by Reality Check)
5 A levels, 4 at A*
8 A* at GCSE
An 'amazing' personal statement
An 'amazing' interview...

...and you didn't receive an offer.

I wonder why?
Yea I do too it was a bummer. It hurt cause I really wanted to do Law there, but maybe it was for the best idk. I did 9 subjects for GCSE, 8A*s and 1B for French. The 5 A levels I did, 4th one was an A because it was English at AS level. So it was 4 A levels and 5 AS levels actually. I was also school topper for like 3 years in a row, and had a got of other academic based extra curriculars such as debating.
My mom says its probably because of the high number of entries they received this year because of the calculated grades and COVID.
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Alishalol
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I’d say a mistake many of my friends made was that if they applied to oxbridge they’d make all other 4 choices safe and then they’d end up at a subpar uni if they didn’t get in which is not what they deserved. If ur smart and u know ur grades are good, apply to mainly elite unis cos that’s what I did and I managed to get my 2nd choice that I absolutely love but got rejected for my fourth.


Instead of being accepted by 4 - 5 unis and going to a bad one I got rejected by a few but still got one of my highest choices.

For example, cambridge was my top choice , I got rejected (wasn’t surprised but I had a go!) but got into LSE where only 2 ppl in my highly selective school got an offer. So go for it and make sure u have at least one safe one but go big or go home!!


One last thing. For law, u need to consider how they look at u and make their decisions.

Cambridge: interviews pretty much everyone, clat, but what ppl skip over is that gcse grades, as long as ur a levels are good are still extremely important

LSE: this is the weird one, u need v good grades at gcse but ppl got rejected for their subject choices at a level, go on their website to see what they like and what they don’t. PERSONAL STATEMENT is EXTREMELY important, they read it over many many times and make decisions based on this.

UCL and KINGS: ucl is a bit tougher to get into but both care about your LNAT score which has to be roughly a few points above the average to secure kings and even more than that (~25 min) to secure UCL, however UCL rejects many students because of their LNAT essay so make sure to practice these.


These are the elite unis I think you should consider, before u make ur choice
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harrysbar
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(Original post by LividOwl9)
I’m sure that the differences are negligible after Oxbridge, but tbh I’m not able to visit any and I’m not really sure how I feel about certain factors ( eg London vs not London, campus vs city) I’m just not sure which side I fall on each of those. I love London, but I’m not married to it. One of my siblings went to a campus, the other a city and they both had a great time so.

My narrowing down is mostly being based on rankings, and the potential to work in a legal career in London, I’m 80% sure I want to work as a solicitor. For reference, I am predicted 3 A*, have decent GCSEs, volunteered with citizens advice, and am doing an pew on law.

So naturally Oxbridge tops the list, I will probably apply to Cambridge. Then some of Bristol, LSE/KCL/UCL, SOAS, Exeter, Durham, Nottingham. Do these seem about right? What order would you put these in for reputation in law?

Secondly is it a bad idea to apply only to these unis? Like, how competitive is law really, would it be a bad idea not to apply to some some slightly lower ranked unis?

Thanks for any help
I would knock SOAS off the list due to their financial problems, which you can google.

Re - Bristol, Exeter, Durham, Nottingham - you should be able to visit at least some of these cities over the summer to see how you feel about tiny cities like Durham compared to more vibrant ones like Bristol/Notts. Even if there is no live open day, it's still important to feel at home in the city you plan to live in for 3 years. It's not worth putting them in order (apart from SOAS last) because that is subjective - they are all great unis for Law and beyond that it comes down more to which ones you get a better feel for.
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