Anonymous #1
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Hi,
I want to apply to Oxford University for law, but I’m worried I don’t have enough law super curriculars for my personal statement.
I haven’t done debate clubs, mooting competitions or model UN which lots of people do - and it’s to late to start.
COVID restrictions are also making things difficult as you can’t sit in courts or anything.
I know you can talk about law books which I will do but does anyone have examples of law supercurriculars which I could start doing now, even with COVID.
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Nataliee_cotts
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Hi, I know it’s not the same as doing face to face work experience but virtual experience is really good to do!
Maybe look at future learn courses
Do your own type of research like an EPQ
Join an online group for debate
Do essay competitions
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Nataliee_cotts)
Hi, I know it’s not the same as doing face to face work experience but virtual experience is really good to do!
Law at university is an academic endeavour, not vocational training. There is literally zero need for any sort of 'work experience'.
(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi,
I want to apply to Oxford University for law, but I’m worried I don’t have enough law super curriculars for my personal statement.
I haven’t done debate clubs, mooting competitions or model UN which lots of people do - and it’s to late to start.
COVID restrictions are also making things difficult as you can’t sit in courts or anything.
I know you can talk about law books which I will do but does anyone have examples of law supercurriculars which I could start doing now, even with COVID.
I really wouldn't get too hung up with all these 'super curriculars' - they're just a way for middle class people to use their sharp elbows on other middle-class people in the hope that it'll get their child pushed to the front of the queue.

Presenting a predictable, breathless and packed history of 'debate clubs...model UN...blah, blah' bores everyone to tears, because essentially the ATs can see the working: its mechanistic and often pointless. It would be much better for you to find an area of the law which really interests you (for me it was causation, inchoate offences and equity) and do some focussed reading on it. What really interests you about it - what questions does it answer and, more importantly, what questions does it raise (there should be far more of the latter than the former). Can you talk about these problems and your interest in a lucid, intellectual way? Note that no-one expects you to have any of the answers, but what they are looking for is an ability to think on your feet and talk through a problem.

This is worth a million 'Model UN' super-curriculars which, frankly, no-one gives a stuff about.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Nataliee_cotts)
Hi, I know it’s not the same as doing face to face work experience but virtual experience is really good to do!
Maybe look at future learn courses
Do your own type of research like an EPQ
Join an online group for debate
Do essay competitions
Thank you for the ideas!!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Law at university is an academic endeavour, not vocational training. There is literally zero need for any sort of 'work experience'.

I really wouldn't get too hung up with all these 'super curriculars' - they're just a way for middle class people to use their sharp elbows on other middle-class people in the hope that it'll get their child pushed to the front of the queue.

Presenting a predictable, breathless and packed history of 'debate clubs...model UN...blah, blah' bores everyone to tears, because essentially the ATs can see the working: its mechanistic and often pointless. It would be much better for you to find an area of the law which really interests you (for me it was causation, inchoate offences and equity) and do some focussed reading on it. What really interests you about it - what questions does it answer and, more importantly, what questions does it raise (there should be far more of the latter than the former). Can you talk about these problems and your interest in a lucid, intellectual way? Note that no-one expects you to have any of the answers, but what they are looking for is an ability to think on your feet and talk through a problem.

This is worth a million 'Model UN' super-curriculars which, frankly, no-one gives a stuff about.
This is so reassuring thank you! I am really interested in constitutional law so I will defo mention that on my statement
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
This is so reassuring thank you! I am really interested in constitutional law so I will defo mention that on my statement
Yes, I was always interested in Consti - and you've got so much to talk about! Don't just stick to the inevitable illegal prorogation of parliament, but think about the current proposals around judicial review, and wider questions around access to justice.

You'll find that you have a billion words if you're not careful

Good luck with your application.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, I was always interested in Consti - and you've got so much to talk about! Don't just stick to the inevitable illegal prorogation of parliament, but think about the current proposals around judicial review, and wider questions around access to justice.

You'll find that you have a billion words if you're not careful

Good luck with your application.
Yeah there are so many interesting parts to it, i am quite interested in America’s constitution and how it provokes a political paralysis, and also Scottish devolution and the British Constitution since I live in Scotland. I am worried about the low character limit on my personal statement!

You seem to know you’re stuff! Can you recommend any areas of constitutional law/law in general that you find interesting? I’d love some new areas to research.

And thank you!!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah there are so many interesting parts to it, i am quite interested in America’s constitution and how it provokes a political paralysis, and also Scottish devolution and the British Constitution since I live in Scotland. I am worried about the low character limit on my personal statement!

You seem to know you’re stuff! Can you recommend any areas of constitutional law/law in general that you find interesting? I’d love some new areas to research.

And thank you!!
You're welcome You can't possibly put everything in your PS, so don't worry about that - think of it as an appetiser to the main dish of your Oxbridge interview. You need to show the ATs that you've thought about things, but don't worry about having to cram everything in - quality, not quantity.

I'm not being unhelpful, but my interests aren't going to help you find what yours are: you can only do that through independent reading and thinking. As I said earlier, I was interested in causation, inchoate offences and equity, but they might bore you silly. The areas of consti which you mention are a rich seam to mine: there's plenty to mull over a possible Yes to an indyref2 and what that might mean for devolved powers (and the nature of devolved powers anyway). You can also show here that you appreciate that law doesn't exist in some vacuum, but interfaces with many other areas such as politics and economics. Lots to talk about!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're welcome You can't possibly put everything in your PS, so don't worry about that - think of it as an appetiser to the main dish of your Oxbridge interview. You need to show the ATs that you've thought about things, but don't worry about having to cram everything in - quality, not quantity.

I'm not being unhelpful, but my interests aren't going to help you find what yours are: you can only do that through independent reading and thinking. As I said earlier, I was interested in causation, inchoate offences and equity, but they might bore you silly. The areas of consti which you mention are a rich seam to mine: there's plenty to mull over a possible Yes to an indyref2 and what that might mean for devolved powers (and the nature of devolved powers anyway). You can also show here that you appreciate that law doesn't exist in some vacuum, but interfaces with many other areas such as politics and economics. Lots to talk about!
Yeah that’s fair enough but it’s just interesting to hear of some sides of law I haven’t thought about aside from obvious areas.
But yeah there are so many things to talk about with that!
Thank you so much for all the advice I really appreciate it
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah that’s fair enough but it’s just interesting to hear of some sides of law I haven’t thought about aside from obvious areas.
But yeah there are so many things to talk about with that!
Thank you so much for all the advice I really appreciate it
You're welcome - good luck with your application
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