medstudent2021
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I am currently out of education but really want to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. I am currently looking into access to medicine courses. Do I actually have a good chance of getting in with this course or is it a waste of time. I think it is my only option but I don't know much about it. Also, I am currently 20 so it would be a few years before I would get to go to university, I have a lot of anxiety about it because medicine is such a long course, I would be in my late twenties before I could start making a living. Has anyone been in a similar situation, do a lot of people pursue medicine at an older age? Thanks
0
reply
Dentaldreams
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by medstudent2021)
I am currently out of education but really want to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. I am currently looking into access to medicine courses. Do I actually have a good chance of getting in with this course or is it a waste of time. I think it is my only option but I don't know much about it. Also, I am currently 20 so it would be a few years before I would get to go to university, I have a lot of anxiety about it because medicine is such a long course, I would be in my late twenties before I could start making a living. Has anyone been in a similar situation, do a lot of people pursue medicine at an older age? Thanks
I guess I can relate to the fact that I’ll be older than most people when I finish what I want.
I’m a dental nurse trying to become a dental hygiene therapist, but I’ve had some setbacks due to covid. I’m 19 and looking to go to uni next year, if I get in!! I’ll be mid twenties by the time I’m done at this rate.
I’d go for it, especially if that what you want to do! It’s important to enjoy your job
1
reply
IXVMMI
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by medstudent2021)
I am currently out of education but really want to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. I am currently looking into access to medicine courses. Do I actually have a good chance of getting in with this course or is it a waste of time. I think it is my only option but I don't know much about it. Also, I am currently 20 so it would be a few years before I would get to go to university, I have a lot of anxiety about it because medicine is such a long course, I would be in my late twenties before I could start making a living. Has anyone been in a similar situation, do a lot of people pursue medicine at an older age? Thanks
Hi, I'm going into my 3rd year of Med school and you'd be suprised how many people are much older than you. I think, if it's something you really want to do, then go for it of course!
1
reply
GANFYD
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by medstudent2021)
I am currently out of education but really want to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. I am currently looking into access to medicine courses. Do I actually have a good chance of getting in with this course or is it a waste of time. I think it is my only option but I don't know much about it. Also, I am currently 20 so it would be a few years before I would get to go to university, I have a lot of anxiety about it because medicine is such a long course, I would be in my late twenties before I could start making a living. Has anyone been in a similar situation, do a lot of people pursue medicine at an older age? Thanks
Kabzzzy any chance you could offer the benefit of your wisdom here, please? Thanks
1
reply
Kabzzzy
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by medstudent2021)
I am currently out of education but really want to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor. I am currently looking into access to medicine courses. Do I actually have a good chance of getting in with this course or is it a waste of time. I think it is my only option but I don't know much about it. Also, I am currently 20 so it would be a few years before I would get to go to university, I have a lot of anxiety about it because medicine is such a long course, I would be in my late twenties before I could start making a living. Has anyone been in a similar situation, do a lot of people pursue medicine at an older age? Thanks
Thanks GANFYD!

To give a bit of background, I've just completed an Access course last month and I'm starting Medicine this September at the age of 28. In terms of having a good chance, if you apply to the correct Universities there is no reason you can't get in. There are Universities like KMMS that don't have a cap on the number of mature or graduate students they take in, and then there are some that may only take a few "non-traditional" applicants. You'll have to do some research around this, though we will have an Access course wiki page up on TSR soon that will at least show which Universities accept courses as well as their entry requirements.

The Access course is quite literally designed for people who have not been in education for a while. We had degree-holders like myself, people who left education at GCSEs and also people from abroad who had just gotten their level 2 Maths / English GCSEs. It doesn't really matter what background you have.

20 is not old at all. There are so many bright students who don't get a place at University because Medicine is so competitive. They take gap years, strengthen their applications, and will be older than 18 when they start. I'm not sure why you need to wait a few years, but to clarify, Access courses are for anyone 19+ and Universities accept them as long as you've been out of education for 3-5 years - it's not meant to be a fix for failed A-levels, for example. In my class, only three of us were applying to Medicine. I got in, one other also got accepted but is deferring entry to 2022, and the other got the grades but didn't know about the UCAT so is going to apply for 2022 entry. The others in my class applied to things like Biomed and Dental Hygiene and have a place at University. Other Science classes also saw a lot of people getting offers for University. So the course does work, but you'll have to put in the work. I'll list a few things you'll have to be on top of:

GCSEs - Access students tend to have different requirements, but the majority of Universities will still want a 6/B in Maths and English Language. Some may even expect you to have a minimum of 5 GCSEs with the core sciences being a part of that. Again, do your research when looking into Universities.

Medical work experience - As the course is only one academic year, you don't have predicted grades like A-level / IB Students. Your application has to be strong in other ways, and experience is likely going to be the main factor. If you don't have a job that you can use to relate skills to a medical profession, then you need to make sure you get a lot of relevant medical work experience and really see how hospitals function and the role of all healthcare staff. I'd also highly advise it as you say you have anxiety. Any role in a Hospital will be high-pressure, it would be worth seeing if it's something you can see yourself doing before you commit to any courses.

UCAT - Everyone takes this entrance exam and it's used to filter out the masses of students applying. You'll want to spend 2 months prior to your course starting to study / practise this to get as high a score as you can. The simple reality is that a low score will get you zero interviews no matter how well you do in your Access course. I feel like this should be common knowledge, but ALL 4 of the other students (2 dropped out) had no idea what it was and then had to struggle learning this as the course started. Not advised!

UCAS - Your actual application will be done during the time you start college, but you can still prepare your personal statement (PS) beforehand to save time. People have different views on how important the PS actually is, but again if you don't have predicted grades you don't want any other part of your application to be weak.

Interviews - As a mature student, you will spend most of your time talking about experiences that have made you want to take this path. Not only do you discuss why you've chosen this path, but you'll have to back it up with real examples from that medical work experience you have done. There are so many boxes to tick here, you need to make sure that everything you do can somehow represent the qualities they want.

And then of course, you have to finish your Access course. There are 45 graded credits which is basically 15 modules, and it tends to be 5 Chemistry, 5 Biology, and then 5 Physics or anything appropriate that has some maths involved. Each module tends to have 3-4 assessments, so you'll need to have enough time throughout the course to study a lot. You can maintain a part-time job, but a full-time job will most definitely hinder your performance. I'd actually argue it's a lot better than how A-levels are set out where you have to take all your exams at the end of the year.

You're not too old, you can definitely pursue this. It's a lot of work though, so you need to be determined and resilient. I've tried to give you the whole picture, but it's best to take things one step at a time so you don't get overwhelmed. Let me know if you had any other questions!
2
reply
University of Kent Reps
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Hi medstudent2021,

Kent rep and a mature student here! I had a similar dilemma but I was even older than you! I finished my 1st degree at the age of 23, worked for a couple of years, and then wanted to go back to uni and do a law degree in order to become a solicitor. The route to qualification as a solicitor will altogether take me 6 years (and I'll be 31 when qualified). However, I realised that it does not really matter how old you are when it comes to a career change. Some people change their careers in their 30s,40s, 50s, and even later. You're still very young and have nothing to worry about. I say you should pursue your dreams! I never regretted drastically changing my career path and my future.

In collaboration with Canterbury Christ Church, Kent has a newly opened med school. If you'd be interested in it in the future, here is a link to KMMS website: https://kmms.ac.uk. It's a great course!

If there is anything else we can help you with in the future drop us a DM

- Agnes
Last edited by University of Kent Reps; 1 month ago
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (2)
3.64%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (8)
14.55%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (8)
14.55%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (6)
10.91%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (21)
38.18%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (10)
18.18%

Watched Threads

View All