Campus vs city univeristies..Which is your personal preference and why?

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rxrx2004
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Thanks, everyone
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lilGem
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I went to a campus uni for my undergrad (UEA) and masters in a city (Sheffield)

I think as a whole I preferred a campus as it was more of a community, but I also loved my time in a city. They each have their own merits and it's down to personal preference
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rxrx2004
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(Original post by lilGem)
I went to a campus uni for my undergrad (UEA) and masters in a city (Sheffield)

I think as a whole I preferred a campus as it was more of a community, but I also loved my time in a city. They each have their own merits and it's down to personal preference
thank you for your reply, I am struggling to decide
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Max1989
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Campus-city uni's, you get the best of both worlds, get the things to do and nightlife of a city whist being able to live within 10 minutes walk of both the city center and campus and not needing to travel across the city to each of your lectures.
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Wildean99
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I've just finished my undergraduate at Newcastle University and I would say that there is an excellent mixture of having everything you need on campus, whilst also being a short walk into the city centre. I think though you need to have a think about what your priorities are and why - and then from there, ascertain whether these are best fulfilled by a campus or city university. I also think it can make a difference depending on the course as well because for some courses, it makes more sense to be on a campus with lots of contact time, whereas for subjects like mine (English Literature and History) I had less contact time and a lot of reading and so it didn't matter as much for me. I also think it's nice to mix in with the local community and this is much easier to do at a city university for obvious reasons. I'd be happy to discuss this further if you want to either here or via private message, but otherwise I hope this was at least somewhat helpful in making a decision.
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rxrx2004
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(Original post by Max1989)
Campus-city uni's, you get the best of both worlds, get the things to do and nightlife of a city whist being able to live within 10 minutes walk of both the city center and campus and not needing to travel across the city to each of your lectures.
I didn't know that existed? What exactly are they? Are they very common?

(Original post by Wildean99)
I've just finished my undergraduate at Newcastle University and I would say that there is an excellent mixture of having everything you need on campus, whilst also being a short walk into the city centre. I think though you need to have a think about what your priorities are and why - and then from there, ascertain whether these are best fulfilled by a campus or city university. I also think it can make a difference depending on the course as well because for some courses, it makes more sense to be on a campus with lots of contact time, whereas for subjects like mine (English Literature and History) I had less contact time and a lot of reading and so it didn't matter as much for me. I also think it's nice to mix in with the local community and this is much easier to do at a city university for obvious reasons. I'd be happy to discuss this further if you want to either here or via private message, but otherwise I hope this was at least somewhat helpful in making a decision.
Thanks for your reply man, means a lot
I would like to go somewhere where there is a strong sense of community, especially for my undergrad
I am planning on studying Engineering or something similar
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Theloniouss
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I'd have to consider each uni individually. Some campus unis can be a bit inconvenient because they're so far from accommodation, proper shops etc. (e.g. Warwick), and some city unis can be awful because of the city they're in (i.e. any London uni, birmingham etc.). It depends on the specifics.
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rxrx2004
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
I'd have to consider each uni individually. Some campus unis can be a bit inconvenient because they're so far from accommodation, proper shops etc. (e.g. Warwick), and some city unis can be awful because of the city they're in (i.e. any London uni, birmingham etc.). It depends on the specifics.
It's doing my head in. There's so much to consider for each uni!
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Lshort17
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Have to say the city, its much easier to get into town and do things with friends. I know the noise may cause problems if you are in central kinda halls. Its so easy to get places and you feel like you are part of that city.

Ive not experienced a campus uni but theres one in the same city as me and its too far out and not really near anything, i mean it does have some good links for transport into the city but i dunno think its personal preference
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rxrx2004
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(Original post by Lshort17)
Have to say the city, its much easier to get into town and do things with friends. I know the noise may cause problems if you are in central kinda halls. Its so easy to get places and you feel like you are part of that city.

Ive not experienced a campus uni but theres one in the same city as me and its too far out and not really near anything, i mean it does have some good links for transport into the city but i dunno think its personal preference
Did you find it hard to settle in a city uni? It must feel like jumping in the deep end!
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Other_Owl
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It varies what city your living in. Utrecht was great to get around.
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Theloniouss
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(Original post by rxrx2004)
It's doing my head in. There's so much to consider for each uni!
What I did was get a longlist for my subject (maybe 20-30 unis, straight from the league tables after establishing basic elimination criteria like "not in London"), then look at those unis' websites and create a shortlist of around 10 unis (based on course content, specific location, entry criteria etc. - you get some ideas after a bit, try to take notes).

Then, I visited all of them on open days, asked extra questions to admissions staff, took notes and got a general feel for the unis. After that, I'd managed to narrow it down to my 5 UCAS choices.

It's a long process, but if you break it down into manageable steps and work through them over a long period of time it's not as difficult as it seems.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Max1989)
Campus-city uni's, you get the best of both worlds, get the things to do and nightlife of a city whist being able to live within 10 minutes walk of both the city center and campus and not needing to travel across the city to each of your lectures.
This is what I loved about Chester.

(Original post by rxrx2004)
Thanks, everyone
Campus unis always made me feel trapped - the concept of being stuck in a place full of other students and noone else, with a bus journey into the nearest civilisation, was/still is my idea of living hell.
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absolutelysprout
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i go to a city uni, cardiff and i really like it. the walk isn't that bad to get to places and i'd never felt confined as everything was within a reasonable distance. if i did feel trapped within my accommodation, i could just go to town. plus, i was able to make friends with my seminar group as the psychology building was a good 20 minute walk each way which is a lot nicer if you have company :yep: i've definitely gained an appreciation for long walks having now done first year :lol:
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Wildean99
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(Original post by rxrx2004)
Thanks for your reply man, means a lot
I would like to go somewhere where there is a strong sense of community, especially for my undergrad
I am planning on studying Engineering or something similar
Well in that case I think a campus university might be preferable in that the community is literally on your doorstep and you'll also have more contact time than I did as well so it's good to be close to everything. That being said, your university community is really what you make of it and so there's are lots of ways of forging that for yourself at a city university, such as joining societies for example.
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rxrx2004
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
What I did was get a longlist for my subject (maybe 20-30 unis, straight from the league tables after establishing basic elimination criteria like "not in London"), then look at those unis' websites and create a shortlist of around 10 unis (based on course content, specific location, entry criteria etc. - you get some ideas after a bit, try to take notes).

Then, I visited all of them on open days, asked extra questions to admissions staff, took notes and got a general feel for the unis. After that, I'd managed to narrow it down to my 5 UCAS choices.

It's a long process, but if you break it down into manageable steps and work through them over a long period of time it's not as difficult as it seems.
i'll do this, thank you for the idea

(Original post by Emily_B)
This is what I loved about Chester.


Campus unis always made me feel trapped - the concept of being stuck in a place full of other students and noone else, with a bus journey into the nearest civilisation, was/still is my idea of living hell.
(Original post by absolutelysprout)
i go to a city uni, cardiff and i really like it. the walk isn't that bad to get to places and i'd never felt confined as everything was within a reasonable distance. if i did feel trapped within my accommodation, i could just go to town. plus, i was able to make friends with my seminar group as the psychology building was a good 20 minute walk each way which is a lot nicer if you have company :yep: i've definitely gained an appreciation for long walks having now done first year :lol:
hahah I thought making this thread would help me decide and I'm now even more confused!

(Original post by Wildean99)
Well in that case I think a campus university might be preferable in that the community is literally on your doorstep and you'll also have more contact time than I did as well so it's good to be close to everything. That being said, your university community is really what you make of it and so there's are lots of ways of forging that for yourself at a city university, such as joining societies for example.
thank you
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absolutelysprout
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(Original post by rxrx2004)
i'll do this, thank you for the idea




hahah I thought making this thread would help me decide and I'm now even more confused!


thank you
i think there's loads of factors to take into consideration tbh and it's what is most important to you- i didn't even consider whether unis were campus or city ones before applying and i don't regret choosing cardiff one bit :yep:
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Lshort17
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(Original post by rxrx2004)
Did you find it hard to settle in a city uni? It must feel like jumping in the deep end!
It sure was, i mean i come from the countryside, but i think i found it more exciting. The city in question is Birmingham and i heard theres a lot of crime which i dont normally get where i live. Another big thing was having streetlights at night bit of a weird thing.

Ive fell in love with brum though! Been a great year hopefully can enjoy the next 2
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Starlord3434
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(Original post by Max1989)
Campus-city uni's, you get the best of both worlds, get the things to do and nightlife of a city whist being able to live within 10 minutes walk of both the city center and campus and not needing to travel across the city to each of your lectures.
Specifically, what universities are campus-city unis? (where the university is a campus uni but is located within the city)
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brokenbiscuits
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(Original post by Starlord3434)
Specifically, what universities are campus-city unis? (where the university is a campus uni but is located within the city)
University of Birmingham is a campus uni located in a city.
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