nat2607
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Hello, so I have asked to step down in my job and go to reduced hours and pay as I’m not enjoying the job I’m in now, it’s a different manager who I will have and they have sorted this out but today I got a job offer from a job I applied for before I asked for this and have the interview when it had been sorted of me stepping down, this job is a great opportunity full time which I ideally need and a lot better hours but I’m now feeling sick about handing my notice in and asking them for a reference I feel like I’ve messed them about but I know I need to do what’s best for me but my anxiety is getting the better of me and don’t know how or what to say to them where they don’t get annoyed at me and worried they won’t want to give me a reference since I’ve messed them about
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NovaeSci
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They are not allowed to give you a bad reference, so I wouldn't worry about that. As long as you haven't loads of absences or any disciplinary action you'll be perfectly fine.
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beagerr
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
They are not allowed to give you a bad reference, so I wouldn't worry about that. As long as you haven't loads of absences or any disciplinary action you'll be perfectly fine.
They can give bad references, and the likelyhood is you won't find out what was said, but in the event you do find out you can challenge it, so most employers will just give a brief "yes, he worked here" and recruitment know this is negative.
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NovaeSci
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(Original post by beagerr)
They can give bad references, and the likelyhood is you won't find out what was said, but in the event you do find out you can challenge it, so most employers will just give a brief "yes, he worked here" and recruitment know this is negative.
An employer can give you a bad or unfavourable reference, but only if they genuinely believe it to be true and accurate and have reasonable grounds for that belief. If it's just a case of moving a job and you've worked well, not always been off and never been subject to any disciplinary action, then there's no reason for them. It happened to me once and I had the grounds to challenge it and won.
Last edited by NovaeSci; 1 month ago
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
They are not allowed to give you a bad reference, so I wouldn't worry about that. As long as you haven't loads of absences or any disciplinary action you'll be perfectly fine.
Actually, employers are able to give you bad references. As long as what they say is the truth.
So for example if you got sacked, got any warnings or any other disciplinary action, had a lot of absences, were regularly late etc etc then they could mention that, as it would be the truth and they would more than likely have records or other evidence to back that up.
However they couldn't go round saying bad things that are subjective (e.g. they think you were lazy, but that's just their opinion) or anything that's not strictly true.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by nat2607)
Hello, so I have asked to step down in my job and go to reduced hours and pay as I’m not enjoying the job I’m in now, it’s a different manager who I will have and they have sorted this out but today I got a job offer from a job I applied for before I asked for this and have the interview when it had been sorted of me stepping down, this job is a great opportunity full time which I ideally need and a lot better hours but I’m now feeling sick about handing my notice in and asking them for a reference I feel like I’ve messed them about but I know I need to do what’s best for me but my anxiety is getting the better of me and don’t know how or what to say to them where they don’t get annoyed at me and worried they won’t want to give me a reference since I’ve messed them about
Don't turn down the opportunity of the new job.
It's natural to worry about handing your notice in. But they should be ok about it. They may feel you messed them about slightly, but on the off chance they do say anything, explain that you applied for this job before the reduced hours thing, and possibly add that you didn't actually think you would get it. But that's it's too good an opportunity to turn down. They should understand. I wouldn't worry too much about a bad reference. As long as you haven't got any warnings, other disciplinary action, a lot of absences, been late a lot etc then you haven't got much to worry about.
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StriderHort
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I think we can put the 'employers cant give bad references' lie to bed , of course they can, they just need to be a bit more careful what they say... but the idea that they can't and won't find a way tot ell a new boss that a candidate is a dud is wishful thinking and always was.
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username5702009
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You are leaving for a better opportunity, the reason to mention when you hand in your notice. Hope the new job is all you wish for.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by StriderHort)
I think we can put the 'employers cant give bad references' lie to bed , of course they can, they just need to be a bit more careful what they say... but the idea that they can't and won't find a way tot ell a new boss that a candidate is a dud is wishful thinking and always was.
Exactly.
They could even choose to not give a reference at all if they wanted. Which can look just as bad in itself.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Emma:-))
Exactly.
They could even choose to not give a reference at all if they wanted. Which can look just as bad in itself.
Yup, that's basically saying you are dead to them, they won't even confirm you worked there, and the gap in your references alone can bar you from many other jobs.
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Justvisited
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(Original post by StriderHort)
Yup, that's basically saying you are dead to them, they won't even confirm you worked there, and the gap in your references alone can bar you from many other jobs.
Why would their confirmation be needed? You've got a bunch of payslips and other documentation.

If another employer wants you for a vacancy they won't let a brief gap put them off will they.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Justvisited)
Why would their confirmation be needed? You've got a bunch of payslips and other documentation.

If another employer wants you for a vacancy they won't let a brief gap put them off will they.
...Yes? Depends on the job, but plenty insist on a full/5 year checkable work history and don't generally hire people with significant unexplained gaps. (I've had a few and certainly applied to scores of employers with this condition over the years, it's obv less common the more casual the job)

Think about it, a former employer refusing to give you a reference?, or merely having to explain to an interviewer/HR staff why you CAN'T provide a reference? That's a deathblow to many application there and then. Payslips etc might prove you worked there, but it just underlines how badly things ended.
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Final Fantasy
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References aren't as important in the UK as other countries. Usually it's just to confirm your role and dates worked. Ignore it, you got the offer elsewhere with a better deal so just go for it. Resigning is very easy - google a letter of notice template, copy/paste and fill in the blanks. Simple.
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