sweetescobar
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** Questions are related to picture that is linked from savemyexams.co.uk website **

What does it mean when it says that because the monoclonal antibody binds to the receptors on the surface of the platelets, it inhibits fibrinogen from binding, how? Also how does that stop blood clotting from occuring?

Also, what does it mean by the overproduction or inappropriate production of B cells?
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learningizk00l
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(Original post by sweetescobar)
** Questions are related to picture that is linked from savemyexams.co.uk website **

What does it mean when it says that because the monoclonal antibody binds to the receptors on the surface of the platelets, it inhibits fibrinogen from binding, how? Also how does that stop blood clotting from occuring?

Also, what does it mean by the overproduction or inappropriate production of B cells?
When the monoclonal antibodies bind to the receptors they're already bound to the receptor so the fibrinogen can't also bind to it think sort of like with enzymes: if a substrate binds to an active site it's sort of blocking the active site so a different protein can't attach.
With the inappropriate production, I'd guess this just means producing B cells when it's unnecessary or shouldn't be produced such as against your own body cells/tissues which could lead to an autoimmune disease
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sweetescobar
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(Original post by learningizk00l)
When the monoclonal antibodies bind to the receptors they're already bound to the receptor so the fibrinogen can't also bind to it think sort of like with enzymes: if a substrate binds to an active site it's sort of blocking the active site so a different protein can't attach.
With the inappropriate production, I'd guess this just means producing B cells when it's unnecessary or shouldn't be produced such as against your own body cells/tissues which could lead to an autoimmune disease
Sorry to bother you again, but because I am moving from IGCSE there's something that I am confused about.

We learnt that in the process of blood clotting, platelets clump together at the site of the wound and release and enzyme (thrombin) that acts on the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen converting it into the insoluble fibrin.

Is it that this fibrinogen is a substrate to that enzyme, and the enzyme catalyses its conversion to fibrin? That would explain a lot.
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learningizk00l
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(Original post by sweetescobar)
Sorry to bother you again, but because I am moving from IGCSE there's something that I am confused about.

We learnt that in the process of blood clotting, platelets clump together at the site of the wound and release and enzyme (thrombin) that acts on the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen converting it into the insoluble fibrin.

Is it that this fibrinogen is a substrate to that enzyme, and the enzyme catalyses its conversion to fibrin? That would explain a lot.
Yes, that would be right. And this is the sort of " model answer" that comes up a lot in A level: The substrate, in this case fibrinogen would be complementary in shape to the specific enzyme (here thrombin) so they will bind to form an enzyme-substrate complex. You will also likely learn the induced fit model which says that the substrate is at first complementary but once it binds to the enzyme, the enzyme undergoes a conformational shape change (changes shape slightly to fit the substrate more closely). The catalyzation works as the enzyme will put strain on bonds within the substrate, breaking it up more easily/faster. (Or in the case of enzymes catalyzing the formation of products will hold two substrate molecules near each other reducing any repulsion between them which will make it easier for bonds to form).
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