AnonymousUser0
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i’m currently in year 13 and take humanities, but i’ve recently discovered i want to pursue medicine. Obviously I can’t reapply to uni and even if i did i wouldn’t get a place on any medicine courses, but i am interested in GEM. My question is though is it actually realistic as someone who’s family doesn’t have endless funds for higher education? best case scenario, i won’t be earning for at least 8 or 9 years.
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Priyapinkrabbit
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well, where do you want to study medicine?
please tell me what A-level subjects you have taken and what are your predicted grades/AS level grades (if you've got them)?

GEM is possible, available, less competitive and PRETTY CHEAP in countries like Ukraine, Georgia and Poland ( a bit on the expensive side).
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AnonymousUser0
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(Original post by Priyapinkrabbit)
well, where do you want to study medicine?
please tell me what A-level subjects you have taken and what are your predicted grades/AS level grades (if you've got them)?

GEM is possible, available, less competitive and PRETTY CHEAP in countries like Ukraine, Georgia and Poland ( a bit on the expensive side). I haven’t looked into where yet, i’m more thinking about whether it’s a feasible option really.
a level maths, english and politics - definitely not transferable to medicine, predicted A*A*A but no results yet.
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Smeraldettoi
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(Original post by AnonymousUser0)
i’m currently in year 13 and take humanities, but i’ve recently discovered i want to pursue medicine. Obviously I can’t reapply to uni and even if i did i wouldn’t get a place on any medicine courses, but i am interested in GEM. My question is though is it actually realistic as someone who’s family doesn’t have endless funds for higher education? best case scenario, i won’t be earning for at least 8 or 9 years.
Some universities will accept humanities degrees onto a grad med course but you will be required to take science a-levels. There are courses that are an extra year longer that will accept you into medicine provided you take non science A-levels and achieve top grades but they are rare
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Priyapinkrabbit
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This is just a suggestion, you could take a gap year after you finish year 13 to do bio and chem a-levels. But how much can your family actually afford to pay per year, you also need to look at that.

You could study medicine in Romania or Bulgaria, the tuition fees are more affordable and you can go straight into medicine the course is 6 years. As long as you have bio and chem and your results are pretty decent.
Last edited by Priyapinkrabbit; 1 month ago
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AnnaBananana
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Priyapinkrabbit’s suggestion is good. GEM tAkes longer and costs more than the standard A100 course route - and it’s far more competitive to get in to graduate entry medicine programmes - the A100 programmes are very competitive but the GEM ones are even more so! A year out to do chem and bio would be your quickest and cheapest options.
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mooseotter
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Most GEM students I have met who did humanities and discovered later that they wanted to do medicine did some work in hospitals as HCAs or something similar to earn money while they applied. The GAMSAT is far more difficult than the UCAT and it is more competitive than applying for the A100 course. My very good friend is 29 and it took him 3 years to get into the GEM programme and he came in the top 10 of the year in Medicine last year but it took him a while to get there.

I'd say if it is the career you want to do, do everything in your power to get there but understand that it is going to be a long road and it won't necessarily be as easy as it may originally seem. I know other people apply for the 5 year A100 even if they do already have a degree because it is easier to get onto and if you work in the NHS for a bit, that really helps with your personal statement and your interview! It depends how much time you can sacrifice for the end result because, as you said, this isn't all for free! The NHS bursary can help you a bit but nowhere near as much as student finance
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