urlocalinmate
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If you have no work experience, no EPQ, and potential predicted grades ranging from C to U's?
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McGinger
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What subject are you interested in studying at University?
Are you studying A levels or similar qualifications?
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urlocalinmate
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(Original post by McGinger)
What subject are you interested in studying at University?
Are you studying A levels or similar qualifications?
Studying A-Levels, looking at Primary Teaching (5-11).
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McGinger
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(Original post by urlocalinmate)
Studying A-Levels, looking at Primary Teaching (5-11).
There are QTS Foundation courses (Year 0) at some Unis that have very low entry grades - this one needs 80 UCAS points - https://www.bcu.ac.uk/courses/founda...th-qts-2021-22
However, you will need some experience of working with children - you will not get an interview without that.

Alternatively, look at 'Education Studies' - these are degrees in 'education' that do not give you QTS (Qualified Teacher Status). You would therefore need to do a postgrad 1 year teaching qualification after this, but you wont need the work experience to start the first degree. For this one you will need at least CCC at A level - https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/ug-education-studies/

Or - you could just do an apprenticeship as a Teaching Assistant and/or actually get some work experience and apply next year.
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Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by urlocalinmate)
If you have no work experience, no EPQ, and potential predicted grades ranging from C to U's?
Hello,

It is great to hear that you want to study Primary Education, I study the 3-7 route myself and so I am happy to advise you!

The average UCAS points needed is 112-120. The requirements are quite high due to them being set by Government standards. However, there are ways round this if you do not have the points.

YSJ offers an Education, Children and Counselling Foundation Year which can be found here: https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/courses/und...foundation-yr/. This only requires 48 UCAS points which is much more achievable and can allow you to progress onto Primary Education. You could then gain a degree and QTS in 4 years total.

Alternatively, you could complete an access to higher education course. This takes a year to complete and can be done online or at most colleges. This would give you more UCAS points and is a lot cheaper than the tuition of a foundation year. This can be done on a range of subjects but you could complete one in education if this is your passion and it will count for some experience.

Work experience is no longer a requirement at our university but it is definitely something that is helpful. Even if you could volunteer in some nurseries or pre schools over the summer for a few hours, you will get an understanding for working with children and learning through play.

It is also worth noting that you need 5 GCSEs including English, mathematics and science at C/4 or above! I just thought that I would note this as you did not mention these qualifications.

YSJ is very well known for teaching and we make outstanding teachers. 95% of our students find work within a year of graduating and schools love to employ YSJ teachers. However, it is worth looking at different universities for teaching and making a list of entry requirements and your priorities. Decide which one suits you best based on this!

I hope this helps!
Lydia
Last edited by Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador); 1 month ago
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urlocalinmate
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(Original post by Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador))
Hello,

It is great to hear that you want to study Primary Education, I study the 3-7 route myself and so I am happy to advise you!

The average UCAS points needed is 112-120. The requirements are quite high due to them being set by Government standards. However, there are ways round this if you do not have the points.

YSJ offers an Education, Children and Counselling Foundation Year which can be found here: https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/courses/und...foundation-yr/. This only requires 48 UCAS points which is much more achievable and can allow you to progress onto Primary Education. You could then gain a degree and QTS in 4 years total.

Alternatively, you could complete an access to higher education course. This takes a year to complete and can be done online or at most colleges. This would give you more UCAS points and is a lot cheaper than the tuition of a foundation year. This can be done on a range of subjects but you could complete one in education if this is your passion and it will count for some experience.

Work experience is no longer a requirement at our university but it is definitely something that is helpful. Even if you could volunteer in some nurseries or pre schools over the summer for a few hours, you will get an understanding for working with children and learning through play.

It is also worth noting that you need 5 GCSEs including English, mathematics and science at C/4 or above! I just thought that I would note this as you did not mention these qualifications.

YSJ is very well known for teaching and we make outstanding teachers. 95% of our students find work within a year of graduating and schools love to employ YSJ teachers. However, it is worth looking at different universities for teaching and making a list of entry requirements and your priorities. Decide which one suits you best based on this!

I hope this helps!
Lydia
Thank you for the reassurance, I've got the GCSE's required so hopefully all goes well.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by urlocalinmate)
If you have no work experience, no EPQ, and potential predicted grades ranging from C to U's?
You may well be able to get into uni, but future employers in the primary sector may well be put off by less than great A-levels. A retake year may be more worth it long term.
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urlocalinmate
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
You may well be able to get into uni, but future employers in the primary sector may well be put off by less than great A-levels. A retake year may be more worth it long term.
I shouldn't be doing Physics to be honest. Way too hard to understand.
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