user342
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Could a physics graduate going into an engineering graduate scheme/into industry realistically expect similar salary to that of an engineering graduate with the same qualifications? Is it common? Is it harder- what are the pros/cons?
1
reply
History98
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
A physics grad could theoretically obviously go into engineering but I suspect it would be very difficult in practice. They would need to take time to learn more in demand, sector specific engineering skills before becoming a bit competitive. Graduate schemes at major institutions are competitive and can be hard to get even for engineering graduates. If you want to be an engineer do engineering, it's already hard enough getting into an engineering graduate scheme as an engineering graduate, don't make it harder by getting a physics degree. If you want to stay in STEM as a physicist then the best route would probably be via being a college teacher or a university academic (although even in academia, positions in the pure sciences seem more competitive than in engineering).
Last edited by History98; 1 month ago
1
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by user342)
Could a physics graduate going into an engineering graduate scheme/into industry realistically expect similar salary to that of an engineering graduate with the same qualifications? Is it common? Is it harder- what are the pros/cons?
Salary won't be an issue. If you get a place on an engineering scheme you'll almost certainly be paid the same salary. The biggest hurdle will be getting into a scheme in the first place, or otherwise securing a graduate engineering role. They can be quite competitive. Many of them only accept engineering graduates, and if they do accept physics (or other science graduates like mathematicians) you'll still be competing against other graduates with more relevant qualifications and, and with many of them having some form of work experience too, which is also extremely important.
0
reply
user342
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Smack)
Salary won't be an issue. If you get a place on an engineering scheme you'll almost certainly be paid the same salary. The biggest hurdle will be getting into a scheme in the first place, or otherwise securing a graduate engineering role. They can be quite competitive. Many of them only accept engineering graduates, and if they do accept physics (or other science graduates like mathematicians) you'll still be competing against other graduates with more relevant qualifications and, and with many of them having some form of work experience too, which is also extremely important.
Are there a lot of physics graduate roles in industry working with engineers (ie also producing a product but not the designing aspect), is the salary similar, would it be possible to enter those with just a bachelor's or a master's?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by user342)
Are there a lot of physics graduate roles in industry working with engineers (ie also producing a product but not the designing aspect), is the salary similar, would it be possible to enter those with just a bachelor's or a master's?
I think it's probably very rare to see physics graduates in engineering in any significant numbers outside of perhaps electronics design, parts of the nuclear sector, building physics and acoustics, and perhaps in a few other highly analytical roles. If you want to work in engineering I would really have to recommend studying engineering.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (3)
3.75%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (11)
13.75%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (14)
17.5%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (9)
11.25%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (29)
36.25%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (14)
17.5%

Watched Threads

View All