Are these wider reading books for Economics too 'basic'?

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Hey17
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Hi there,
I'm applying to study Economics at uni this year (ideally Cambridge would be my top preference) and am trying to finalise my personal statement. I'm starting to worry that the books I've mentioned (Undercover Economist very briefly in passing) and 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism are what majority of people put and not very impressive. So far, I'm over the character limit and looking to cut down (I've talked about courses, talks, articles and an essay comp) but I'm worried my reading is weak. I've just started another book - Good Economics for Hard Times. Any thoughts/advice?
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SlaveofAll
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For beginners, they don't seem to be basic in the sense that virtually anyone besides students and professionals can read and understand thoroughly.
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Peterhouse Admissions
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It's not about how complicated the books you've read are, but what you're able to say about the reading that you've done. You could list loads of books, but that wouldn't tell us anything about your understanding of them, your analysis or connections you've made in your reading. It's much more important to give us your own perspective on what you've read than to list 'impressive' books without more. Also, an entry-level book that can help you get to grips with the subject or introduce you to fundamental concepts is probably much more useful than a higher level text that you struggle to understand.

Hope this helps!
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Hey17
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(Original post by SlaveofAll)
For beginners, they don't seem to be basic in the sense that virtually anyone besides students and professionals can read and understand thoroughly.
Ahh thank you!
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Hey17
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(Original post by Peterhouse Admissions)
It's not about how complicated the books you've read are, but what you're able to say about the reading that you've done. You could list loads of books, but that wouldn't tell us anything about your understanding of them, your analysis or connections you've made in your reading. It's much more important to give us your own perspective on what you've read than to list 'impressive' books without more. Also, an entry-level book that can help you get to grips with the subject or introduce you to fundamental concepts is probably much more useful than a higher level text that you struggle to understand.

Hope this helps!
Thank you so much!
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SlaveofAll
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(Original post by Hey17)
Ahh thank you!
I'm always glad to help.
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