Ellie_327
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I am looking to study criminology at uni (undergraduate level) and I am just wondering how BA and BSc degrees differ? Also which unis would anyone recommend for a criminology degree? Thanks!!
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McGinger
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1) BA / BSc - no real difference. BSc is a relative new degree title and many Unis still call non-STEM degrees BA simply because they always have, or because its based within the 'Humanities' dept/faulty. In theory BSc means 'science' (ie. social science) but its unlikely you be able to spot the difference in either curriculum or approach. Employers certainly wont care.

2) Crim as a degree. There are thousands of Crim grads working in areas that have nothing to do with Crim. Nothing wrong with that as Crim, like many other degrees, isnt actually 'vocational' and the degree gives you a multitude of 'thinking' skills that regardless of subject. employers want. Its a perfectly sensible social science degree - but forget any idea of being a 'criminologist'. You may end up in a connected area - criminal justice, probation work, housing, social work, child welfare, drug rehabilitation, local government, teaching, youth work etc etc - or you could end up working in any one of the jobs you see advertised as 'graduate' with no specified degree subject.
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Ellie_327
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(Original post by McGinger)
1) BA / BSc - no real difference. BSc is a relative new degree title and many Unis still call non-STEM degrees BA simply because they always have, or because its based within the 'Humanities' dept/faulty. In theory BSc means 'science' (ie. social science) but its unlikely you be able to spot the difference in either curriculum or approach. Employers certainly wont care.

2) Crim as a degree. There are thousands of Crim grads working in areas that have nothing to do with Crim. Nothing wrong with that as Crim, like many other degrees, isnt actually 'vocational' and the degree gives you a multitude of 'thinking' skills that regardless of subject. employers want. Its a perfectly sensible social science degree - but forget any idea of being a 'criminologist'. You may end up in a connected area - criminal justice, probation work, housing, social work, child welfare, drug rehabilitation, local government, teaching, youth work etc etc - or you could end up working in any one of the jobs you see advertised as 'graduate' with no specified degree subject.
Thanks this helps a lot! Do you have any universities that you would recommend/not recommend for criminology? Don’t worry if not, this has helped so much already! Thank you
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McGinger
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(Original post by Ellie_327)
Thanks this helps a lot! Do you have any universities that you would recommend/not recommend for criminology? Don’t worry if not, this has helped so much already! Thank you
Depends on your grade predictions.
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Ellie_327
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(Original post by McGinger)
Depends on your grade predictions.
A, B, Distinction (equal ucas points to an A) ??
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University of Bath
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(Original post by Ellie_327)
I am looking to study criminology at uni (undergraduate level) and I am just wondering how BA and BSc degrees differ? Also which unis would anyone recommend for a criminology degree? Thanks!!
Hi there,

I have just finished studying Sociology at the University of Bath.

In my experience, BSc courses tend to have more grounding in research methods and that is true of the Criminology course at Bath. You can check out more information about Bath's criminology course here.

As part of the course, you will have to take compulsory modules in crime and society, research methods, critical thinkers in criminology, criminal justice policy and theory, the history and politics of crime and punishment, global crimes of the powerful and complete a dissertation in your final year. Apart from these compulsory modules, you are able to pick and choose whatever modules you are interested in and also have the option to choose modules from other departments too, like Psychology or Sociology.

Bath's Social Sciences courses consistently rank in the top 10 and Bath itself is a top 10 university. It is a campus based university, with a friendly community vibe and great facilities, such as the Sports Training Village, you can check out a tour of the campus here. In addition, Bath is a beautiful city to live in, with a rich history and lots to do and explore.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask

Isobel (A Final Year Sociology Student)
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Ellie_327
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(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there,

I have just finished studying Sociology at the University of Bath.

In my experience, BSc courses tend to have more grounding in research methods and that is true of the Criminology course at Bath. You can check out more information about Bath's criminology course here.

As part of the course, you will have to take compulsory modules in crime and society, research methods, critical thinkers in criminology, criminal justice policy and theory, the history and politics of crime and punishment, global crimes of the powerful and complete a dissertation in your final year. Apart from these compulsory modules, you are able to pick and choose whatever modules you are interested in and also have the option to choose modules from other departments too, like Psychology or Sociology.

Bath's Social Sciences courses consistently rank in the top 10 and Bath itself is a top 10 university. It is a campus based university, with a friendly community vibe and great facilities, such as the Sports Training Village, you can check out a tour of the campus here. In addition, Bath is a beautiful city to live in, with a rich history and lots to do and explore.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask

Isobel (A Final Year Sociology Student)
Thank you so much, this is so helpful! I will have a look at bath, I hadn’t realised they ran a criminology course! Thank you for your help and advice!!
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Trinculo
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There can be a big difference. Some BA Crims are indistinguishable from BScs. Others vary a lot - and it really is going to revolve around the stats content. Some BAs will make several stats and testing quantitative modules mandatory, others won't - and this will be reflected in the kind of work and dissertation that you will be able to produce at the end. For example - if you look at the Manchester BA Crim, this is no different to a BSc Crim pretty much anywhere else. Stats and Quantitative modules are required. If you look at something like Herts or Kent BA Crim - they have only one required module on "research methods" which may only be very rudimentary.

This is only a crude measure - but with the less stats-y BA's the content may be more along the lines of literature review and you may not have to produce/use a data set at all in your dissertation. For a BSc and some of the BAs, the content will likely include a bit of analysis and regression and you will probably have to produce or use a data set in your dissertation. In practice, this might be along the lines of a thesis like "Women are subjected to gendered violence and I did 52 surveys and they respondents said x" versus a thesis like "Women are subjected to gendered violence and analysis of 400 crime reports is tested statistically". Not saying in a BA you won't have to produce some maths, tho. It is social science after all. If you want zero maths, read law or criminal justice.
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Ellie_327
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(Original post by Trinculo)
There can be a big difference. Some BA Crims are indistinguishable from BScs. Others vary a lot - and it really is going to revolve around the stats content. Some BAs will make several stats and testing quantitative modules mandatory, others won't - and this will be reflected in the kind of work and dissertation that you will be able to produce at the end. For example - if you look at the Manchester BA Crim, this is no different to a BSc Crim pretty much anywhere else. Stats and Quantitative modules are required. If you look at something like Herts or Kent BA Crim - they have only one required module on "research methods" which may only be very rudimentary.

This is only a crude measure - but with the less stats-y BA's the content may be more along the lines of literature review and you may not have to produce/use a data set at all in your dissertation. For a BSc and some of the BAs, the content will likely include a bit of analysis and regression and you will probably have to produce or use a data set in your dissertation. In practice, this might be along the lines of a thesis like "Women are subjected to gendered violence and I did 52 surveys and they respondents said x" versus a thesis like "Women are subjected to gendered violence and analysis of 400 crime reports is tested statistically". Not saying in a BA you won't have to produce some maths, tho. It is social science after all. If you want zero maths, read law or criminal justice.
Thank you! This has cleared everything up perfectly. I am not against maths but didn't know how much it was put into each type! Thanks for the help!
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University of Kent Reps
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Hi Ellie_327,

Criminology is a great choice! It's such an interesting course. I'd agree with the previous users when it comes to the difference between BA and BSc - BSc tends to be more quantitative research-focused, but it really depends on the university and course structure.

Uni of Kent offers a great Criminology course (more info here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/under...34/criminology). You can choose to study a standard course or you have an option of adding quantitative research (just tick the option below the course name and have a look at the module list under "Course structure").

Kent is a TEF Gold awarded university so you can be confident that you will get an excellent teaching experience. In addition to that, Criminology is run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology, and Social Research, which is one of the best in the country for teaching and research.
If you'd like to see who the academic staff are, what are their special areas of interest and their academic achievements have a look here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/social-policy...esearch/people.

I personally (and honestly!) could not recommend Kent more if you're thinking about doing research. Kent was ranked in the top 10 in The Complete University Guide 2021 for research intensity. I studied at a different university before and in all honesty, Kent's focus on research makes a real difference in the learning experience.

I hope this helps! If there is anything else I could help you with - let me know!

- Agnes
Last edited by University of Kent Reps; 1 month ago
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