Should I learn Japanese in first year of uni?

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Anonymous #1
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Hi there is was looking at taking a module in Japanese, the beginner one at uni as I thought it may be good as I want to get up a business in the future which I will need to have relations in Japan. Is it a good idea considering I have never done a language before and what can I expect like what is examination like, prep work and would it be easy to pass. Bare in mind it’s only level one of 6 or 8 I think, so I assume it will be pretty beginner
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Kabzzzy
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Hello! I did beginner (Ab Initio) Japanese for sixth form a long time ago. In 2 years I'd say you learn some nice basic vocabulary and sentences, you'll master hiragana and katakana, and you'll have a good introduction to kanji. I can't imagine you would get much further than learning the basic alphabets in one module, but perhaps it would be a good start if it's something you want to continue on the side yourself.
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi there is was looking at taking a module in Japanese, the beginner one at uni as I thought it may be good as I want to get up a business in the future which I will need to have relations in Japan. Is it a good idea considering I have never done a language before and what can I expect like what is examination like, prep work and would it be easy to pass. Bare in mind it’s only level one of 6 or 8 I think, so I assume it will be pretty beginner
Hi!
I think languages do take some work, but if you keep things interesting then learning won't be so hard. If you've never learnt another language before it may be quite difficult, but don't get discouraged! You can totally do it. From my experience, having had to learn three foreign languages, there's a lot of ways such as to keep going when you feel like quitting.

1. diversify how you study the material. If it's rewriting all the time, or (my favourite) making it into a game. I would label various things in my room or at home with sticky notes with the name of it in the language I was learning as well as how it is pronounced in case I forgot how the letters sound like. Then before I used the item, I would say what it is. I would do this all the time until the vocab stuck then I would try do it from memory. This works with many things, whether it's colours, vocab, verbs, numbers, you just have to tweak it slightly (like you don't wanna put sticky notes on your food, but you can stick a list of names on the fridge door)
2. Immerse yourself in the language. Find books, movies, shows, maybe some anime too in your case (I heard Death Note is pretty good?), music, whatever. Languages are living and the best way to learn them is to live them.
3. If you have a friend who speaks Japanese, ask them to speak to you in it quite frequently.
4. Stay strong! It will get to many points where you're like ugh why?! But trust me it's so worth it. Before you know it you will get to a point where you learn without realising you're learning.

Hope this helps! Anything else lmk!
Samantha
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Escape Studios Rep
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Hi! Am currently learning Japanese for the same reasons as well, I think it is best to start in first year as it does take a while to learn the language and the earlier the better. First year Uni is not as intense than second or third year, so starting in first year is ideal. You could even study by yourself using some useful resources online on how to learn the language, which is cheaper and according your time.

There are some videos on YouTube that help give you the basic in just a hour, or learn hiragana and katakana in interesting memorable ways, so do check them out for fast learning if your interested.

Hope that helped
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Anonymous #1
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Thanks for your replies, I will definitely look into some of the thing you have said. As well would you think it would be beneficial to pay £275 for another module of it for the second semester as I have used up all my modules for the first
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Stumpy1001
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi there is was looking at taking a module in Japanese, the beginner one at uni as I thought it may be good as I want to get up a business in the future which I will need to have relations in Japan. Is it a good idea considering I have never done a language before and what can I expect like what is examination like, prep work and would it be easy to pass. Bare in mind it’s only level one of 6 or 8 I think, so I assume it will be pretty beginner
As a person who speaks very good Chinese. When i started my Chinese course i went into the higher levels. I can tell you at my uni what they aim for you to be able to do at a level one in chinese (assuming you reach it) is nothing special. Japanese is the same in that you wouldn't be able to use it in any sort of professional or even semi-professional setting. Unless of course an employer/ client has a penchant for communicating with a person who has the linguistic capability of a 3 year old.

The long and short of it is you need to decide what you are after. If you want Japanese to be part of your repertoire then a lot more than level one is required. Just doing level one if you have an actual desire to use it is just a waste of credits, time and effort.
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Anonymous #1
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I wanna learn Japanese as I’m thinking of setting up a Japanese importing business and I think learning Japanese would be very beneficial
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