goneclear
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hey, how hard is it at a level and is it interesting? I hear ppl tend to fall in love with chem a level after they didn’t like it too much at gcse, also is the content a big jump from gcse, thanks in advance
0
reply
icecream14
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Yeah I prefer A Level Chemistry much more than GCSE - especially the organic side as we didn't get much organic at GCSE.
I personally preferred GCSE bio compared to A Level, as at A Level there is a lot of content to cover and learn for biology. A lot of people say chemistry is more difficult than bio but I found that I struggled much more in remembering the bio content.
There is definitely way more content for both A Level subjects compared to GCSE, especially biology.
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
A lot of people find understanding A level chemistry hard (including people who found it easy at gcse) and a lot of people find the application questions in biology exams hard. Personally I didn’t find either too difficult as I found the subjects really interesting so didn’t mind spending my time consolidating and practicing exam technique.

I would say you can’t really compare GCSEs and a levels as at gcse you are studying 10 subjects you kinda like and at A level you’re studying just 3 of your favourite ones. I found A-levels a lot easier as I only had to study subjects I was good at and the commitment was only 27hrs a week whereas at gcse I was doing 11 subjects and spending 40+hrs a week studying so I was burnt out and exhausted. The content is obviously more difficult but so doable.
Last edited by Hellllpppp; 1 month ago
0
reply
goneclear
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Hellllpppp)
A lot of people find understanding A level chemistry hard (including people who found it easy at gcse) and a lot of people find the application questions in biology exams hard. Personally I didn’t find either too difficult as I found the subjects really interesting so didn’t mind spending my time consolidating and practicing exam technique.

I would say you can’t really compare GCSEs and a levels as at gcse you are studying 10 subjects you kinda like and at A level you’re studying just 3 of your favourite ones. I found A-levels a lot easier as I only had to study subjects I was good at and the commitment was only 27hrs a week whereas at gcse I was doing 11 subjects and spending 40+hrs a week studying so I was burnt out and exhausted. The content is obviously more difficult but so doable.
But u still have to do loadssss of independent study, so u burnout eventually ?
0
reply
TheKira
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
I used to dislike GCSE Chemistry, I found it really boring and just chose it for A levels as I didn’t know what to do. Now I love A level Chem, and chemistry in general . In my opinion chemistry is really interesting and I think ppl just dislike it when it comes to exam questions and the application.

Biology used to be my easiest subject at GCSE as all I used to do is read the revision guide and get a 9. Now there’s alot of content to learn and the mark schemes are annoying. The content can be hard to understand at times but you get better with loads of practice.
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by goneclear)
But u still have to do loadssss of independent study, so u burnout eventually ?
The independent study + lessons is 27 hrs a week. 13.5 lessons and 13.5 independent study. And tbh in my first year I did a lot less probably only 10 max independent study. If you spend your time efficiently actively reviewing and revising you can have a lot more free time.
0
reply
goneclear
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Hellllpppp)
The independent study + lessons is 27 hrs a week. 13.5 lessons and 13.5 independent study. And tbh in my first year I did a lot less probably only 10 max independent study. If you spend your time efficiently actively reviewing and revising you can have a lot more free time.
So do u suggest I go to a college
0
reply
icecream14
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by goneclear)
So do u suggest I go to a college
I don't think it matters where you go. You can perform well anywhere if you put the effort in. A Level required you to be independent much more than GCSE where you had teachers helping you with basc everything.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (2)
3.45%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (8)
13.79%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (8)
13.79%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (7)
12.07%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (23)
39.66%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (10)
17.24%

Watched Threads

View All