Are universities scared of mental health problems?

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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 1 month ago
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Hi,

So I've started this discussion after a conversation with staff at my uni about dropping out of a course due to stress and 'mental health' which is a word they used and to be honest they sounded like they were afraid as they started talking about 'the possibility of me becoming ill' and 'having to deal with that' 'which would be unfair to other students'. I had a sense of déjà vu since I've had a friend describe a similar experience to me and having attend another university years ago, I remember a similar sense of fear with regards to mental health problems and fitness to practice when it was discussed in introductory lectures as well.

So, I was wondering how other people think different unis have treated mental health problems (and stress)? How has the support been? Do they like discussing it or do you think any unis are somewhat scared of the subject of mental health problems?
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Mr Wednesday
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Report 1 month ago
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi,

So I've started this discussion after a conversation with staff at my uni about dropping out of a course due to stress and 'mental health' which is a word they used and to be honest they sounded like they were afraid as they started talking about 'the possibility of me becoming ill' and 'having to deal with that' 'which would be unfair to other students'. I had a sense of déjà vu since I've had a friend describe a similar experience to me and having attend another university years ago, I remember a similar sense of fear with regards to mental health problems and fitness to practice when it was discussed in introductory lectures as well.

So, I was wondering how other people think different unis have treated mental health problems (and stress)? How has the support been? Do they like discussing it or do you think any unis are somewhat scared of the subject of mental health problems?
When approaching this subject I think it’s important to remember that universities have teaching and research as their core missions, they are not the NHS and not there to treat you if you are ill on arrival or develop a serious illness. The majority do have some internal services to help students, but there is a real limit to what they are likely to be able to provide. For example your personal tutor is very unlikely to have professional MH training, all they can do is direct you “up the chain” to support services, and unless those include a GP practice on site, they can’t proscribe drugs or hospital treatment.
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