How would you feel if uni students needed to be double vaccinated to start in Autumn?

Watch
Poll: How would you feel if uni students needed to be double vaccinated to start in Autumn?
I'd feel reassured about my own health (52)
15.2%
I'd feel reassured my learning may be less disrupted by isolations/lockdowns (110)
32.16%
I'd feel less anxious about being around large groups (45)
13.16%
I don't mind if others are vaccinated or not (29)
8.48%
I'm concerned it may disadvantage some students (20)
5.85%
I think it's an unfair expectation (83)
24.27%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (3)
0.88%
BlinkyBill
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
This week and article in the BBC spoke about whether university students could be required to be double vaccinated in time for starting university in the autumn.

University students will get "advance warning" if they are required to have vaccines before moving to halls of residence, Dominic Raab has said. The foreign secretary said decisions will be taken in September - but he was keen to encourage vaccine uptake.
And when asked whether they were planning to require students in university halls to get vaccinated, Mr Raab said: "When we come to the crunch, these decisions will be taken in September. We've got some time to go.
The idea to make vaccines compulsory for university students - either to attend lectures or to live in halls of residence - was not ruled out by either education minister Vicky Ford or Downing Street when asked about it earlier this week. "We are still looking at the scope for vaccination certifications," a No 10 spokesman said on Monday.
(article)

If you're starting or returning to university in the autumn, what do you think?


Moderation note:
Please always refer to the NHS website for the most up-to-date advice relating to COVID-19 and vaccination programmes. Neither this thread, nor the BBC article, identify any current vaccine requirement for university students.
This thread is intended to discuss how a double-jab requirement would impact their uni experience, not as a space to debate (including debating the existence of COVID-19 or the validity of the vaccine).
Please ensure all posts are kept within TSR's community guidelines.
Last edited by BlinkyBill; 1 month ago
0
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
If you're in England you can book your vaccine (or find a walk in centre) here: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/corona...s-vaccination/

The booking system is still not set up for people who are within 3 months of their 18th birthday but it should be soon.
1
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Its now clear that the government is considering mandatory vaccinations to access certain things such as nightclubs, and perhaps even certain areas of student activities.

I think it is clear that covid & university halls of residence do not mix well, last year you were only supposed to be able to do rule of 6 outdoors, but it soon became apparent covid was running rife (and this was the original Wuhan Strain). I think we may see a similar uptick this year with the delta variant and lack of social restrictions. It is a very difficult position because the vaccinations are working wonders however they are not perfect and their is still a very large unvaccinated population in the under 30s (which is the student demographic).

Im not sure how I feel about the government 'forcing' vaccines on people but I am ok with organisations & universities mandating it for things such as if you want to live in halls. I would go further, it would be great if universities did require vaccines to access the university/SU sponsored social events; I think the government should use leverage & influence to encourage universities to adopt this policy (ideally before results day, but I think the news will drop last minute)

Now I would still have a vaccine opt out pathway, something like mandatory 2/3 covid tests every week if you are unvaccinated & in halls or on campus (and it would be needed anyway as it is quickly becoming too late for students to get both doses). I also would like to see universities having pop-up vaccination centres at registration/freshers fair that would be a really good way to encourage uptake.
2
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by mnot)
I also would like to see universities having pop-up vaccination centres at registration/freshers fair that would be a really good way to encourage uptake.
I suspect that will happen - there were a few pop-up centres set up in universities by local public health authorities in June when availability was widened to all over 18s - unfortunately they missed the boat and most students had finished for the year.

Pop-ups and walk-ins will work well if students have their first dose at home and are ready for their second dose too :yes:
0
reply
Mesopotamian.
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
I feel that the wording Raab is using is misleading. He talks specifically about “students in halls”, but what about students not in halls? Realistically, I can’t see them enforcing one rule for students living in university accommodation and another rule for those who are not.

I am also of the opinion that the government doesn’t have a trust worthy record and so think that whatever decision they reach, they’ll execute it in the most shambolic way possible which will lead to chaos and confusion nearer the time.
Last edited by Mesopotamian.; 1 month ago
8
reply
𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Having my eldests flat come down with covid 3rd week of October, everyone thought it would not do the rounds again, but it did, and although her flat was super careful, her neighbours who had it in October had caught it twice. I also have workmates in their twenties who are not jabbed almost hospitalized because of it.
Given that, I do not think it should not be made mandatory, just because some cannot have it for health reasons or afraid of needles etc. I think a better approach should be used.
Lectures with a mask on? Same for library. Perhaps half lecture/half online approach (and alternated) so people can socially distance? Or even have the choice of regular testing on the unvaccinated/vaccinated = in person teaching. if you refuse to be vaccinated and also refuse to get tested regular then to have online lectures on lecture capture.
2
reply
Anonymous #1
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
Imo it should be mandatory unless medical exemption. If that it the case then online learning or in person with extra safeguarded precautions for that person like wear double masks or hazelmat or something.

Anyone who don’t want to be vaccinated stay and learn online.
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by 𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂)
Having my eldests flat come down with covid 3rd week of October, everyone thought it would not do the rounds again, but it did, and although her flat was super careful, her neighbours who had it in October had caught it twice. I also have workmates in their twenties who are not jabbed almost hospitalized because of it.
Given that, I do not think it should not be made mandatory, just because some cannot have it for health reasons or afraid of needles etc. I think a better approach should be used.
Lectures with a mask on? Same for library. Perhaps half lecture/half online approach (and alternated) so people can socially distance? Or even have the choice of regular testing on the unvaccinated/vaccinated = in person teaching. if you refuse to be vaccinated and also refuse to get tested regular then to have online lectures on lecture capture.
The afraid of needles is a load of BS. Just lool away. It actually doesn’t hurt.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
I saw someone say that the government is not actually going to impose vaccinations on students they are just trying extra hard to persuade them. Plus it is 8 weeks between jabs if they were going to make it compulsory they would have to act pretty soon.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by Anonymous)
The afraid of needles is a load of BS. Just lool away. It actually doesn’t hurt.
Don't they even give you medication to calm your nerves?
0
reply
WantBeAnonymous
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by BlinkyBill)
This week and article in the BBC spoke about whether university students could be required to be double vaccinated in time for starting university in the autumn.

University students will get "advance warning" if they are required to have vaccines before moving to halls of residence, Dominic Raab has said. The foreign secretary said decisions will be taken in September - but he was keen to encourage vaccine uptake.
And when asked whether they were planning to require students in university halls to get vaccinated, Mr Raab said: "When we come to the crunch, these decisions will be taken in September. We've got some time to go.
The idea to make vaccines compulsory for university students - either to attend lectures or to live in halls of residence - was not ruled out by either education minister Vicky Ford or Downing Street when asked about it earlier this week. "We are still looking at the scope for vaccination certifications," a No 10 spokesman said on Monday.
(article)

If you're starting or returning to university in the autumn, what do you think?


Moderation note:
Please always refer to the NHS website for the most up-to-date advice relating to COVID-19 and vaccination programmes. Neither this thread, nor the BBC article, identify any current vaccine requirement for university students.
This thread is intended to discuss how a double-jab requirement would impact their uni experience, not as a space to debate (including debating the existence of COVID-19 or the validity of the vaccine).
Please ensure all posts are kept within TSR's community guidelines.
I don’t think it should be mandatory for the pure reason that with the current wait times between vaccines, it would be impossible for someone who is as yet unvaccinated to be double jabbed by mid September.
If they were required at a later point (eg to return after Christmas) that would be more reasonable and realistic
5
reply
Anonymous #1
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Anonymous)
I've already had my first dose without medication, I was just wondering .
I don’t think they do.
0
reply
ROTL94
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
I've heard it said countless times by a multitude of people that this vaccine doesn't protect you from the virus nor does it prevent you from being able to transmit it, so I don't see what benefit having double vaccine requirements placed on attendance at university, would have for the university as a whole.
10
reply
Anonymous #1
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by ROTL94)
I've heard it said countless times by a multitude of people that this vaccine doesn't protect you from the virus nor does it prevent you from being able to transmit it, so I don't see what benefit having double vaccine requirements placed on attendance at university, would have for the university as a whole.
It reduces the symptoms and risk of the virus giving you serious illness or needing hospital treatment.
1
reply
Eshar
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by ROTL94)
I've heard it said countless times by a multitude of people that this vaccine doesn't protect you from the virus nor does it prevent you from being able to transmit it, so I don't see what benefit having double vaccine requirements placed on attendance at university, would have for the university as a whole.
Yes, you can still get the virus but the effect it has on you is lessened (eg flu like symptoms but not severe enough to require hospitalisation - does that make sense? 😕)

Yes, you can still pass it on, but you are much less likely to, because there’s ‘less’ of it in your system.

So I reckon vaccinating students won’t be 100% foolproof but is better than not if we want in-person teaching.
4
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by ROTL94)
I've heard it said countless times by a multitude of people that this vaccine doesn't protect you from the virus nor does it prevent you from being able to transmit it, so I don't see what benefit having double vaccine requirements placed on attendance at university, would have for the university as a whole.
Hearing something countless times doesn't make it true. For example "football's coming home".

Here is a study of the data following the Phizer vaccine in Israel:
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...947-8/fulltext
Main Point
Two doses of BNT162b2 are highly effective across all age groups (≥16 years, including older adults aged ≥85 years) in preventing symptomatic and asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections and COVID-19-related hospitalisations, severe disease, and death, including those caused by the B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant. There were marked and sustained declines in SARS-CoV-2 incidence corresponding to increasing vaccine coverage. These findings suggest that COVID-19 vaccination can help to control the pandemic.


I'd ask you to be considerate about how accurate the information in your post is, as there may be many people reading it who misunderstand and think they should not take the vaccine when it may be beneficial for them to do so.

In terms of university attendance, studies like the one I linked show that increased vaccination reduces transmission (reduces, not eliminates) - making university campuses safer than they otherwise would be.
13
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
I feel that the wording Raab is using is misleading. He talks specifically about “students in halls”, but what about students not in halls? Realistically, I can’t see them enforcing one rule for students living in university accommodation and another rule for those who are not.
(Original post by Anonymous)
The afraid of needles is a load of BS. Just lool away. It actually doesn’t hurt.
Mesopotamian - I just don't see how universities can enforce rules for students living in private accommodation as unlike halls, they don't own them.

I totally agree with Anonymous and I say this as someone with a phobia of needles. I have done everything I can in life to avoid needles and refused flu vaccinations etc because of that fear but had to man up when it came to being vaccinated against covid and it really wasn't bad at all - nothing like when needles are used to take blood which is genuinely painful in my opinion.
3
reply
StriderHort
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
Other - I'm sick of the milquetoast complaints and that we've allowed trolling to become a valid form of both expression and government. They can get vaccinated or stay home imo.
2
reply
Steve H
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 month ago
#19
(Original post by harrysbar)
Mesopotamian - I just don't see how universities can enforce rules for students living in private accommodation as unlike halls, they don't own them.

I totally agree with Anonymous and I say this as someone with a phobia of needles. I have done everything I can in life to avoid needles and refused flu vaccinations etc because of that fear but had to man up when it came to being vaccinated against covid and it really wasn't bad at all - nothing like when needles are used to take blood which is genuinely painful in my opinion.
Good on you for standing up to your fear.

To anyone else worried about the needle: it is the tiniest of pricks and it's done before you can finish a breath. Don't let it get in the way of something potentially far worse.

Edit: While I support the requirement for double vaccination, I feel the vaccine needed to have been offered to all 17 year olds already if it was going to be a realistic expectation.
Last edited by Steve H; 1 month ago
4
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by Steve H)
Good on you for standing up to your fear.

To anyone else worried about the needle: it is the tiniest of pricks and it's done before you can finish a breath. Don't let it get in the way of something potentially far worse.

Edit: While I support the requirement for double vaccination, I feel the vaccine needed to have been offered to all 17 year olds already if it was going to be a realistic expectation.
Thank you and I agree with your edit - it should be opened up to all 17 year olds now in my opinion.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (3)
3.75%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (11)
13.75%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (14)
17.5%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (9)
11.25%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (29)
36.25%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (14)
17.5%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed