username5713764
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Going to be studying MSE at Sheffield this September. Any current, or soon to be, MSE students got advice on the best resources and ways to prepare for the course? I'm tryna get as far ahead as I can before I start.
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artful_lounger
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Did you study A-level Further Maths? If not, it would definitely be useful to try and start learning some of the basic concepts relating to complex numbers and matrices before starting, as those are both quite important topics in engineering generally (and matrices and related topics are especially important for materials I think). If you did do FM then, it's probably worth brushing up on those topics anyway

The following website is a handy resource for a lot of the mathematical methods content you'll probably cover in first and maybe second year:
https://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/

Also for some of the more physics-y topics these sites might be a handy reference:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/index.html and
http://britneyspears.ac/lasers.htm

The latter one is a bit tongue in cheek but does cover a lot of topics that might come up in a materials course and was personally recommended to me by a physics PhD before I started taking a condensed matter physics module!

Note that the latter two sites are probably not something you will need to use until after you start on the course. Some of the material in the first site might help with reviewing/learning aspects of matrices and complex numbers, plus reviewing the calculus you did at A-level maybe.
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username5713764
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Did you study A-level Further Maths? If not, it would definitely be useful to try and start learning some of the basic concepts relating to complex numbers and matrices before starting, as those are both quite important topics in engineering generally (and matrices and related topics are especially important for materials I think). If you did do FM then, it's probably worth brushing up on those topics anyway

The following website is a handy resource for a lot of the mathematical methods content you'll probably cover in first and maybe second year:
https://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/

Also for some of the more physics-y topics these sites might be a handy reference:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/index.html and
http://britneyspears.ac/lasers.htm

The latter one is a bit tongue in cheek but does cover a lot of topics that might come up in a materials course and was personally recommended to me by a physics PhD before I started taking a condensed matter physics module!

Note that the latter two sites are probably not something you will need to use until after you start on the course. Some of the material in the first site might help with reviewing/learning aspects of matrices and complex numbers, plus reviewing the calculus you did at A-level maybe.
I got into uni via an access course. Unfortunately, as it is only a year, I wasn't able to cover many topics. I picked up a copy of 'Engineering Mathematics' by K.A. Stroud, so I'm hoping that'll cover me.
Anyhow, thank you very much for the resources and advice. I'll certainly utilise them.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by mustafam32k)
I got into uni via an access course. Unfortunately, as it is only a year, I wasn't able to cover many topics. I picked up a copy of 'Engineering Mathematics' by K.A. Stroud, so I'm hoping that'll cover me.
Anyhow, thank you very much for the resources and advice. I'll certainly utilise them.
Stroud is more or less the standard text so that should serve you well. The Paul's Online Math Notes site might help you if you want a different perspective on some topic Also the "Schaum's Outline of Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists" covers basically all the topics you're likely to come across in an engineering course (and then some more too!) except PDEs I think, and has lots of worked examples and questions with solutions. It's a really handy revision tool I think. Plus it's normally pretty cheap!

I'd definitely recommend making sure you're very comfortable with your single variable calculus - make sure you are happy being able to integrate and differentiate a wide range of functions (not just straightforward polynomials, but also expontential functions of the type e^f(x), and trigonometric functions) and apply the different methods of integration/differentiation (e.g. integration by substitution/parts, chain/product rules for differentiation).

Also as above, trying to get some familiarity with complex numbers and matrices will be a big help, although this will be covered in the course normally. If you've not done much work with partial fractions it might be worth practicing that as they can make some integrals you might come across in the course a lot easier to evaluate. Basically you mostly want to make sure you're as comfortable with maths as you can be!
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username5713764
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Stroud is more or less the standard text so that should serve you well. The Paul's Online Math Notes site might help you if you want a different perspective on some topic Also the "Schaum's Outline of Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists" covers basically all the topics you're likely to come across in an engineering course (and then some more too!) except PDEs I think, and has lots of worked examples and questions with solutions. It's a really handy revision tool I think. Plus it's normally pretty cheap!

I'd definitely recommend making sure you're very comfortable with your single variable calculus - make sure you are happy being able to integrate and differentiate a wide range of functions (not just straightforward polynomials, but also expontential functions of the type e^f(x), and trigonometric functions) and apply the different methods of integration/differentiation (e.g. integration by substitution/parts, chain/product rules for differentiation).

Also as above, trying to get some familiarity with complex numbers and matrices will be a big help, although this will be covered in the course normally. If you've not done much work with partial fractions it might be worth practicing that as they can make some integrals you might come across in the course a lot easier to evaluate. Basically you mostly want to make sure you're as comfortable with maths as you can be!
Alright, I understand. Thank you again for the tips, I'll get on that right away.
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