mollyt11
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Hey, I’m in Year 11 and I’m thinking about Post-18 options. I’m interested in both History and English and am certain that I will teach one of them in the future. I was wondering how easy it is to teach both subjects? I know there is such thing as a joint degree, which I am considering, but would this allow me to teach both subjects?? Thank you
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holly_1994
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Hey Molly!

Fab to see you are making plans for the future. I'm starting my teacher training in Sep, and I can tell you a bit about what I know so far.

If you do a joint degree in History and English, at least 50% of your degree must be in the subject that you teach. So, if you did a standard joint degree where half your degree was in English and half in History, you could then go on to specialise in one of the subjects by doing a PGCE in English or History. You cannot do a joint PGCE, and even if you do a specialised degree in education (i.e. Primary Teaching, Secondary Teaching), you are asked to specialise in ONE subject.

But, the chances are you'll be able to, and possibly encouraged to, teach other subjects. I know people who are History teachers who are also required to teach English or Geography or RE, so it all depends on where you are needed most, based on my own research and what my teacher friends have told me.

The school I'm joining in September (I'm training via the SCITT scheme, which you might find useful to Google) has one History teacher and an RE teacher who also teaches History. So, they only have one specialist in History at the school until I join in September. The RE teacher may not specialise in History, but she is required to teach it alongside her specialism of RE. Typically, you're expected to teach other subjects that are not within your specialism. If you did a joint degree in English and History, it would make you a fantastic candidate for taking on extra teaching in another subject.

So, to recap:
- choose a degree you enjoy, whether this be a single or joint degree in one or two subjects
- if you choose to do a degree in teaching (primary or secondary, e.g.) you will need to specialise in ONE subject
- when you are qualified and working in a school as a teacher, you will no doubt have opportunities to teach other subjects, and if you mention this to the school they will likely find a way to use you in another subject area
Last edited by holly_1994; 1 month ago
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mollyt11
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Hey Holly!

Thank you so much for your reply. It’s all starting to make sense now. I’ve struggled to find a clear answer online, so thank you for clearing this up.

Thank you also for sharing your experience, I wasn’t aware that there was a different route into teaching and I will definitely look more into the SKITT scheme!

I wish you the best of luck in September, and thank you again
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by mollyt11)
Hey, I’m in Year 11 and I’m thinking about Post-18 options. I’m interested in both History and English and am certain that I will teach one of them in the future. I was wondering how easy it is to teach both subjects? I know there is such thing as a joint degree, which I am considering, but would this allow me to teach both subjects?? Thank you
You can definitely do a joint degree in English and history which would leave the door open to teach both subjects. You're a long way off doing your PGCE though, so I wouldn't worry too much about your subject specialism right now.

I would suggest trying to find out more about jobs that aren't teaching- there are lots of interesting jobs out there that you might not be aware of yet, so don't settle on teaching because it seems familiar.
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holly_1994
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(Original post by mollyt11)
Hey Holly!

Thank you so much for your reply. It’s all starting to make sense now. I’ve struggled to find a clear answer online, so thank you for clearing this up.

Thank you also for sharing your experience, I wasn’t aware that there was a different route into teaching and I will definitely look more into the SKITT scheme!

I wish you the best of luck in September, and thank you again
No worries! There are many different routes into teaching: Education degrees in primary- or secondary-level teaching; SCITT and School Direct (both of which mean you do all your training in-house at a school, so you're working in the school from September AND doing your PGCE alongside it, meaning it's a bit intense - but School Direct is salaried, so you get paid); and, of course, your standard university-led PGCE where you spend half your time in university learning about teaching, and half your time in schools on placement.

Good luck with everything, and enjoy your final school year. I know it's a stressful one, but remember to enjoy it
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