Worththeeffort
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I just got a first class honours degree in psychology from the open university.

I really want to work in psychology, yet I am now in my late 40s and cannot afford to put a foot wrong with what I do next...

I'd love to be able to become a psychotherapist... Including offering CBT and EMDR etc but see that I need to be in practice for such courses...

Also, I am not sure whether to do an MSc in Counselling and psychotherapy and do my 100 supervised hours, or just go with a level 3+4 Diploma with the 100 hours ...

Or do a doctorate if I can!

Wondering also just how to get mental health experience. I am a trained Samaritans listener but there seems to be previous else I am allowed to do as I type...

Any advice would be very welcome! 🙂 Thank you!
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bridgesm
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(Original post by Worththeeffort)
I just got a first class honours degree in psychology from the open university.

I really want to work in psychology, yet I am now in my late 40s and cannot afford to put a foot wrong with what I do next...

I'd love to be able to become a psychotherapist... Including offering CBT and EMDR etc but see that I need to be in practice for such courses...

Also, I am not sure whether to do an MSc in Counselling and psychotherapy and do my 100 supervised hours, or just go with a level 3+4 Diploma with the 100 hours ...

Or do a doctorate if I can!

Wondering also just how to get mental health experience. I am a trained Samaritans listener but there seems to be previous else I am allowed to do as I type...

Any advice would be very welcome! 🙂 Thank you!
Hi,
Firstly congratulations on your achievement.
My approach would be to investigate (I know you have done so already) what options there are regardless of limitations (time, money, people, etc) and see which one I would take up. Then I would work backwards, see what I can shuffle, or drop without putting myself in the red financially, socially or mentally. This is because although I get the sense just from your post that this is what you want to do, you need to not lose everything. This is why I'd use this approach, especially given the field of work you want to move into.

Regarding which option, it's hard to comment on given I don't know your situation, but if I wanted to work in psycho-fields, I'd chose to one that is most appealing generally and is the most practical, as the lack of practice is hard to overlook; By experiencing as many areas as possible practically, it makes it easier to specialise in the future (as you have experience in many areas), helps to let you chose what you want to do more accurately by doing several aspects (decreasing the change you'll end up doing something you don't enjoy), and increases the number of people in different areas (increases the connections you could make). I feel coy recommending one of your options but I'd recommend the MSc as counselling and therapy are probably the most fulfilling jobs, and the most encompassing (types of people). But obviously this lacks a lot of specificity.

Sorry that I didn't actually say much that you didn't know, but I feel reading your post it's more about not choosing something you wouldn't be happy with rather than choosing your forever job. Might just be me though...
M.
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Arden University
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(Original post by Worththeeffort)
I just got a first class honours degree in psychology from the open university.

I really want to work in psychology, yet I am now in my late 40s and cannot afford to put a foot wrong with what I do next...

I'd love to be able to become a psychotherapist... Including offering CBT and EMDR etc but see that I need to be in practice for such courses...

Also, I am not sure whether to do an MSc in Counselling and psychotherapy and do my 100 supervised hours, or just go with a level 3+4 Diploma with the 100 hours ...

Or do a doctorate if I can!

Wondering also just how to get mental health experience. I am a trained Samaritans listener but there seems to be previous else I am allowed to do as I type...

Any advice would be very welcome! 🙂 Thank you!
Worththeeffort
Hello! Well done on your degree! I am working on my MSc in Psychology at the moment and know what a tough subject it is.

I have found quite a jump from degree level to masters, this might be because my first degree was in Sociology, so leapfrogging straight into a doctorate level course might be quite a challenge - I assume you used programs such as SPSS on your degree course?

The Psychology market is saturated with people who have a degree and masters in it and very little practical experience, it hasn't effected me because I lecture in the social sciences (I did a PGCE). If you do a masters I recommend volunteering for some laboratory work too. Sounds to me like an MSc in Counselling and Psychotherapy might give you lots of valuable experience. There are lots of fast track opportunities for people with degree's into social work too if that is of interest.

If you have any friends in the social sciences who are considering doing a degree or masters in psychology online or with a blended learning approach, they might like the program at Arden https://arden.ac.uk/our-courses/subj...logy-sociology

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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JamesManc
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Look at Psychological Wellbeing Practitoner MSc's, sometimes they require prior experience but sometimes they do not. They also annoyingly have different titles of the degree/qualification at different universities for instance it is called: MSc/PGDip Primary Mental Health Care at Manchester, but PGCert Low Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Interventions at UCL. If I could go backwards I probably would have done one of these courses, they allow you to become a Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner in NHS, a good stepping stone for clinical psych or counselling psych.
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