only1FLAMINI
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Hey guys is it possible to pass A level french in 1 year starting from almost scratch??
TIA
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Anna Schoon
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(Original post by only1FLAMINI)
Hey guys is it possible to pass A level french in 1 year starting from almost scratch??
TIA
The straight answer is: no - not in normal circumstances (i.e. you're at school or university in the UK, doing other subjects and with loads of other demands on your time).

But... never say die. If you are in a position to almost immerse yourself in French, and on top of that you are prepared to work four to five hours a day on getting your vocab and grammar up to the required level, then I say: why not? After all, at some universities, you can do an ab initio course in a foreign language in which they expect you to get up to A level standard in one year.

And if you already speak another Romance language (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese...) then your journey will be that much easier.
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Rhys_M
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(Original post by only1FLAMINI)
Hey guys is it possible to pass A level french in 1 year starting from almost scratch??
TIA
Je dirais non.
A-level French est signifiquement plus difficile que le GCSE - notamment parce qu'il faut analyser un film et un roman compliqués, et écrire des essaies en utilisant un langage complexe pour obtenir une bonne note. Aussi, les modules sont des sujets de haut niveau, comme la politique, l'immigration, etc.
Pour l'examen d'écoute, il faut avoir de l'expérience en écoutant le français puisque les passages sont plus difficiles à comprendre qu'avec le GCSE, et il faut pouvoir parler avec pas mal de fluidité dans le contrôl oral, donc - si j'étais toi, je commencerai par le GCSE.
Personnellement je trouve l'A-level très dûr, et je le fais dans 2 ans - ayant obtenu un 9 dans le gcse.

Désolé si ce n'était pas la réponse que tu espérais
(Aussi, pardon si j'ai fait des erreurs dans ma réponse - je ne suis que dans la première année d'A-level)
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lemonadetea
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Perhaps consider doing a CEFR exam instead? These would be more achievable as you can take them at various points throughout the year to help you really know what kind of level you’re at, and some universities may accept that in place of an A Level in french
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lemonadetea
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Honestly though, the best path forwards largely depends on what the purpose of you learning french is I.e., the path for business french will vary from academic french
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redmeercat
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Whilst some courses (e.g. uni of Cambs ab initio courses) can get you up to A level standard in about 8 months, it's very intense and would be very difficult on your own. If you speak other languages, esp other romance languages, it would be easier than for someone with no experience with other languages, but honestly, you would have to put A LOT of work in either way. Remember, not only do you have to learn the language, but you also have to learn the exam technique and study 2 books/ a book and a film and learn how to write essays.
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coolschmool
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From my experience, GCSE in one year is perfectly doable, but A-Level? Unless you focus on absolutely nothing else and it's the only subject you're doing... I'd say your chances are not as good, since the demand is so much higher than GCSE and as getting an A* is difficult for people who have been doing it for years. It does depend what you mean by 'pass', but then again I'm assuming you're looking to get an A*/A. However, if you really do want to do it and are willing to put in the work, I guess it could be possible- I don't want to discourage you too much. Also as someone mentioned above, if you know another Romance language, especially Spanish which is really similar, it would definitely speed up the process significantly.
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only1FLAMINI
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Thanks for all the feedback and advice it has been so valuable and interesting hearing everyones opinion. From extra research and all the advice given I have decided to learn french on my own full time for at least 3 months using books and online resources such as Lingq and see how well I have progressed from there as to whether pursue an A level this academic year or the next. Also, I should of mentioned i do have a GCSE in french (a C) but it was a few years ago now. My ambition is to have a good grade in A level french in the next two years max and then join a university with my better grades/higher UCAS points, perhaps even one in france would be nice if BREXIT allowed

It is clear that learning a language requires alot of motivation, dedication and time to achieve geat results and i look forward to the journey!
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only1FLAMINI
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(Original post by Rhys_M)
Je dirais non.
A-level French est signifiquement plus difficile que le GCSE - notamment parce qu'il faut analyser un film et un roman compliqués, et écrire des essaies en utilisant un langage complexe pour obtenir une bonne note. Aussi, les modules sont des sujets de haut niveau, comme la politique, l'immigration, etc.
Pour l'examen d'écoute, il faut avoir de l'expérience en écoutant le français puisque les passages sont plus difficiles à comprendre qu'avec le GCSE, et il faut pouvoir parler avec pas mal de fluidité dans le contrôl oral, donc - si j'étais toi, je commencerai par le GCSE.
Personnellement je trouve l'A-level très dûr, et je le fais dans 2 ans - ayant obtenu un 9 dans le gcse.

Désolé si ce n'était pas la réponse que tu espérais
(Aussi, pardon si j'ai fait des erreurs dans ma réponse - je ne suis que dans la première année d'A-level)
I will try translating this in a year
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