Mazvy
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Thallium(I) chloride is a salt that is sparingly soluble in water. When hydrochloric acid is added to a saturated solution of thallium(I) chloride, a precipitate is formed. Explain why a precipitate is formed
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Kallisto
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I think that it comes to an ionic bond and thus to a solid substance at the bottom. Are you sure that it is Thalium(I)chloride and not sulfate?

5hyl33n Maybe you have a better idea.
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5hyl33n
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(Original post by Kallisto)
I think that it comes to an ionic bond and thus to a solid substance at the bottom. Are you sure that it is Thalium(I)chloride and not sulfate?

5hyl33n Maybe you have a better idea.
Mazvy, are you sure you did not mean thallium(I) sulfate? Thallium(I) sulfate and hydrochloric acid will give thallium(I) chloride.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by 5hyl33n)
Mazvy, are you sure you did not mean thallium(I) sulfate? Thallium(I) sulfate and hydrochloric acid will give thallium(I) chloride.
That is exactly the same I thought: It would really come to an ionic bond what leads to a precipitate at the bottom:

TiSO4 + 2 HCl -> 2 TiCl (precipitation) + H2SO4

That would really makes sense.

charco
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Asking the chemistry experts just to make sure not to babble rubbish. Is it anyhow possible that Thalium(I)chloride reacts with hydrochloric acid to Thalium(I)chloride again, as it is written above?
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charco
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(Original post by Kallisto)
That is exactly the same I thought: It would really come to an ionic bond what leads to a precipitate at the bottom:

TiSO4 + 2 HCl -> 2 TiCl (precipitate) + H2SO4

That would really makes sense.

charco
Pigster

Asking the chemistry experts just to make sure not to babble rubbish. Is it anyhow possible that Thalium(I)chloride reacts with hydrochloric acid to Thalium(I)chloride again, as it is written above?
No.

The question is about the solubility product and the common ion effect.

You are told that thallium chloride is sparingly soluble. It has a solubility product k(sp) = [Tl+][Cl-]

k(sp) is constant

Hence if you add more chloride ions (by adding HCl), then [Cl-] increases. The only way to maintain the k(sp) value is to remove Tl+ by precipitating TlCl.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by charco)
No.

The question is about the solubility product and the common ion effect.

You are told that thallium chloride is sparingly soluble. It has a solubility product k(sp) = [Tl+][Cl-]

k(sp) is constant

Hence if you add more chloride ions (by adding HCl), then [Cl-] increases. The only way to maintain the k(sp) value is to remove Tl+ by precipitating TlCl.
Thanks for your belated answer, it makes the understanding clearer. So, the precipitation is the result of a saturated solubility product, that makes sense.
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