Anonymous #1
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Hi , (ps. I am aware I have made another post but had no replies and am really panicking.)
I'm writing this out of desperation in trying to figure out whether anyone else, as a loved one who lives with the cancer-sufferer, suffers from mental after-effects. There are not many forums for the children of cancer-sufferers.

My Dad has had Leukaemia for a few years now, and it suddenly progressed very quickly over last year and I had to balance studying with seeing him in hospital- it was so bad that they told him to 'get his finances together' as they didn't expect him to survive the year. He was in the hospital for most of the year and it was extremely stressful as he was around a half-hour drive away each time. When he was first diagnosed, I was 15 and now I'm 19. A year before this, my grandad died and so all I could think back to was the pain of my Grandad's death and could not mentally translate that to my own father dying so soon.

I always get super anxious when I'm trying to sleep, as I think back to it and often get really upset even though he is okay now and things are looking positive. I feel sick when thinking of leaving my parents. I worry about anyone I love dying, as I had to consider it a possibility at the worst of my Dad's illness. I also know I boxed up so many emotions at the height of it to almost protect my Mum and little brother and now it's all catching up with me and I don't know where to turn to let it out.

Any reply will be massively appreciated.

Thank you.
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JohnB1
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Hi there. I'm so sorry to hear about your Dad's cancer. There are numerous resources and support groups available for family members too, an example is the Macmillan Community Forum:
https://community.macmillan.org.uk/?...BoCbWEQAvD_BwE
You can also telephone Macmillan to have a chat about your worries, which would be a good starting point. Another option is to speak with your GP who can put you in touch with a suitable organisation.
Take care and stay safe. John
Last edited by JohnB1; 1 month ago
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OxFossil
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi , (ps. I am aware I have made another post but had no replies and am really panicking.)
I'm writing this out of desperation in trying to figure out whether anyone else, as a loved one who lives with the cancer-sufferer, suffers from mental after-effects. There are not many forums for the children of cancer-sufferers.

My Dad has had Leukaemia for a few years now, and it suddenly progressed very quickly over last year and I had to balance studying with seeing him in hospital- it was so bad that they told him to 'get his finances together' as they didn't expect him to survive the year. He was in the hospital for most of the year and it was extremely stressful as he was around a half-hour drive away each time. When he was first diagnosed, I was 15 and now I'm 19. A year before this, my grandad died and so all I could think back to was the pain of my Grandad's death and could not mentally translate that to my own father dying so soon.

I always get super anxious when I'm trying to sleep, as I think back to it and often get really upset even though he is okay now and things are looking positive. I feel sick when thinking of leaving my parents. I worry about anyone I love dying, as I had to consider it a possibility at the worst of my Dad's illness. I also know I boxed up so many emotions at the height of it to almost protect my Mum and little brother and now it's all catching up with me and I don't know where to turn to let it out.

Any reply will be massively appreciated.

Thank you.
You must been through a punishing time ot it. If you need to address the cancer specific side of your experiences, like @JohnB1 says, Macmillan are a good starting place. One other support service specifically for children of parents with cancer is Hope UK. They have a website, forums, FB page etc https://hopesupport.org.uk/support/

But there are lots of other mental health support services for dealing with anxiety, anger, depression etc etc more generally too. Young Minds has reputable, long estabilished services. https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/...-and-symptoms/

I've also had good experiences with kooth.com. They do online counselling too - you have to sign up with them, but you can invent a name and location so it stays anonymous. https://www.kooth.com/

Good luck!
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Anonymous #2
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Your story seems to be exactly the same as my nephew's who lived all his young life with his mother's leukaemia. Please follow the above advice, you can't continue bottling up all that pain!
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