Usernamesaredum
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
The way they work is so weird, you choose them right after high school, and immediately go from 9-10 subjects to 3-4 subjects. Not to mention how many new options you can do like sociology, politics and psychology
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
I guess it must be hard for people without a specific end point in sight. I never really thought about this - the degree I wanted to do needed 3 sciences back when I was picking my a levels and I didn’t like physics so my options were easy to decide (bio,chem,maths).

I guess people should just pick what they need then what they enjoy/ think they’ll enjoy. Don’t worry too much about it as you’ll be able switch after you start if what you pick is not right for you. My college had a 6 week window to swap so plenty of time.
0
reply
whyarewehere?
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
They are pretty difficult to choose because you have to narrow down your subject options. Though if you're very unsure you could attempt something like Physics, Chemistry, Math, Eng Lang&Lit if you want to open up your options. The maximum amount of A-levels I would recommend is five. If you want more subjects then IB could be decent, though now you'd only be able to pick two sciences (unless your school and IB coordinator will allow an extra subject). Alternatively the Scottish system is more flexible, you can pick 5/6 Highers, you can even crash Highers (Highers taken without Nat 5/GCSE). Highers are harder than AS levels.

In terms of difficulty: GCSE Y1<National 4<GCSE Y2<National 5<AS<Higher<A2<Adv Higher
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by whyarewehere?)
They are pretty difficult to choose because you have to narrow down your subject options. Though if you're very unsure you could attempt something like Physics, Chemistry, Math, Eng Lang&Lit if you want to open up your options. The maximum amount of A-levels I would recommend is five. If you want more subjects then IB could be decent, though now you'd only be able to pick two sciences (unless your school and IB coordinator will allow an extra subject). Alternatively the Scottish system is more flexible, you can pick 5/6 Highers, you can even crash Highers (Highers taken without Nat 5/GCSE). Highers are harder than AS levels.

In terms of difficulty: GCSE Y1<National 4<GCSE Y2<National 5<AS<Higher<A2<Adv Higher
Erm 3 is definitely enough A-levels for the average person, 4 if one is further maths. Three great grades are better than 4 mediocre ones. If you really can’t narrow it down and your above average do the IB or 4 A-levels. I was never offered highers so I don’t know much about them.
0
reply
whyarewehere?
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Hellllpppp)
Erm 3 is definitely enough A-levels for the average person, 4 if one is further maths. Three great grades are better than 4 mediocre ones. If you really can’t narrow it down and your above average do the IB or 4 A-levels. I was never offered highers so I don’t know much about them.
I wonder who actually knows their career path at Year 11, basically nobody does, it is normal to be unsure, that's why I suggested an option to broaden the OP's options. Or someone could attempt Chemistry, Maths and English Literature, 3 A-levels if you really don't know what to do. 4-5 A-levels is having a main focus while having sides, to open up options. But you're right, they can do IB, but the only problem is only two sciences.
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by whyarewehere?)
I wonder who actually knows their career path at Year 11, basically nobody does, it is normal to be unsure, that's why I suggested an option to broaden the OP's options. Or someone could attempt Chemistry, Maths and English Literature, 3 A-levels if you really don't know what to do. 4-5 A-levels is having a main focus while having sides, to open up options. But you're right, they can do IB, but the only problem is only two sciences.
I agree that few people know what they want to do career/ degree wise but most people have some ideas of what they don’t want to do. The most ridiculous thing people talk about on tsr is the “facilitating A-levels” as people will do best at what they enjoy so if you have no set goals pick what you enjoy the most. By picking what you enjoy you’ll open up door is what you enjoy eg do biology A-level then a biology degree. In most (not all) circumstances the A-level subject combination doesn’t stop people doing what they want. You can even do a geography or psychology degree etc without ever having done the A level.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (3)
3.53%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (12)
14.12%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (16)
18.82%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (9)
10.59%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (29)
34.12%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (16)
18.82%

Watched Threads

View All