will queens
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I’m really keen on studying medicine and particularly being a doctor. However he length of the degree does intimidate me a bit. I’m already going to be 19 when I start (if I get in first time), then I have to sign up for a further 5-6 years of education. And I have historically had trouble committing to things, I change my mind about what I want to do frequently.

I’m worried I’m not committed enough to commit to 5/6 years. Is this a bad sign, that I change my mind frequently ?
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Turning_A_Corner
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I think if that translates into you quitting your degree then yes, that would be a problem. If it’s something you can overcome then it won’t be.

Feels with this post you’re looking for reassurance that you can do it. Put it this way: if you meet the entry criteria, you are academically capable. The courses themselves are generally designed so that you don’t get too comfortable before you’re moving onto something new. There’s a lot of support in place for students. But no one else can do the work for you, sit the exams, do the reading or anything else. And it’s only ever going to be as interesting as you find it. And once you’re there, you have to eventually commit to a life long career without hopping around between specialties. If that doesn’t interest you and you’re someone who wants to do a lot of different things in your life and have the freedom to do so, then you may find that medicine is too restricting for you. Medicine may be something you rotate back around to when you have more life experience.
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SubhanF
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Use this as a period in your life to change , if you can motivate yourself to commit to medical school there won’t be anything you won’t be able to do after , good luck 👍
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Democracy
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(Original post by will queens)
I’m really keen on studying medicine and particularly being a doctor. However he length of the degree does intimidate me a bit. I’m already going to be 19 when I start (if I get in first time), then I have to sign up for a further 5-6 years of education. And I have historically had trouble committing to things, I change my mind about what I want to do frequently.

I’m worried I’m not committed enough to commit to 5/6 years. Is this a bad sign, that I change my mind frequently ?
Once you start clinical medicine and go on placement >90% of the time it no longer feels like a traditional degree.

If you have problems with committing that is likely to be an issue whatever you do including when you finish university and start work. Medicine is perhaps not the main issue here.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by will queens)
I’m really keen on studying medicine and particularly being a doctor. However he length of the degree does intimidate me a bit. I’m already going to be 19 when I start (if I get in first time), then I have to sign up for a further 5-6 years of education. And I have historically had trouble committing to things, I change my mind about what I want to do frequently.

I’m worried I’m not committed enough to commit to 5/6 years. Is this a bad sign, that I change my mind frequently ?
Umm, you do know that examinations don't stop at the end of medical school, don't you? Junior doctors have exams for yeeeaaarss....

Maybe something to think about
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will queens
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(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
I think if that translates into you quitting your degree then yes, that would be a problem. If it’s something you can overcome then it won’t be.

Feels with this post you’re looking for reassurance that you can do it. Put it this way: if you meet the entry criteria, you are academically capable. The courses themselves are generally designed so that you don’t get too comfortable before you’re moving onto something new. There’s a lot of support in place for students. But no one else can do the work for you, sit the exams, do the reading or anything else. And it’s only ever going to be as interesting as you find it. And once you’re there, you have to eventually commit to a life long career without hopping around between specialties. If that doesn’t interest you and you’re someone who wants to do a lot of different things in your life and have the freedom to do so, then you may find that medicine is too restricting for you. Medicine may be something you rotate back around to when you have more life experience.
Tbh I don't know what the point of this post was, a moment of panic I guess while writing my personal statement. I think I would be more commited to it than anything else so I'm going for it. Thanks for replying.
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will queens
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(Original post by SubhanF)
Use this as a period in your life to change , if you can motivate yourself to commit to medical school there won’t be anything you won’t be able to do after , good luck 👍
This was surprisingly inspiring thank you
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will queens
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(Original post by Democracy)
Once you start clinical medicine and go on placement >90% of the time it no longer feels like a traditional degree.

If you have problems with committing that is likely to be an issue whatever you do including when you finish university and start work. Medicine is perhaps not the main issue here.
Tbh I think this was posted in a moment of panic while writing my personal statement. Mainly cold feet. And the thing about clinical years is good to hear. Thanks
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Democracy
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(Original post by will queens)
Tbh I think this was posted in a moment of panic while writing my personal statement. Mainly cold feet. And the thing about clinical years is good to hear. Thanks
No worries. Good luck
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will queens
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Umm, you do know that examinations don't stop at the end of medical school, don't you? Junior doctors have exams for yeeeaaarss....

Maybe something to think about
Yes I am very aware. Not really the same thing. Besides most professional careers have exams well into their careers, so that's inevitable.

This was mostly posted in a bit of a panic/cold feet the other night anyway and I'm feeling much better about it, but thank you for replying
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Reality Check
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(Original post by will queens)
Yes I am very aware. Not really the same thing. Besides most professional careers have exams well into their careers, so that's inevitable.

This was mostly posted in a bit of a panic/cold feet the other night anyway and I'm feeling much better about it, but thank you for replying
Oh good, I'm glad to hear that
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