el474
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I’m currently trying to prepare a Law personal statement and I’m worried about things I can include related to law as a subject. Up until a few weeks ago I was planning on applying for something different.

I’m currently reading How British Law Is Failing Women by Helena Kennedy, I’ve seen a few posts on here about common law books that I will probably try to read at some point, however I wouldn’t want to include them in my PS because they are so common. Any other book recommendations?

I’ve also enrolled in a free virtual lawyer experience with Slaughter and May online as there’s no real work experience available this year, though I don’t know what it’s worth.

I was planning on framing my personal statement around feminism (hence my first book choice) but would that be a bad idea if I’m applying to top unis? It’s the most personal I can make a PS, however I could try making up something different if that wouldn’t be perceived well by unis. I’m hoping to get some time with a tutor in college to discuss this but as it’s summer I’m not expecting replies from teachers.

Thanks!
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leviticus.
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top law schools aren't going to care about work experience/lawyer stuff unless you can sorta build a chain on what you saw their interested you in x part of law theory and you explored that more by reading z. Have you tried HE+ resources?

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam....uggestions.pdf check this out and scroll down to page 26. Oxbridge love podcasts.
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el474
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(Original post by leviticus.)
top law schools aren't going to care about work experience/lawyer stuff unless you can sorta build a chain on what you saw their interested you in x part of law theory and you explored that more by reading z. Have you tried HE+ resources?

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam....uggestions.pdf check this out and scroll down to page 26. Oxbridge love podcasts.
I’m just looking for a little more practical information about the lawyer world, rather than just academic. It’s no matter if unis aren’t fussed.

Oxbridge isn’t my thing, I’m looking for unis that have a good practical aspect to their course as well as the rigorous academics, such as in a placement year. I’m currently considering LSE/KCL as top choices and most likely some with slightly lower entry requirements incase I miss out on an A*
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Reality Check
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(Original post by el474)
Oxbridge isn’t my thing, I’m looking for unis that have a good practical aspect to their course as well as the rigorous academics, such as in a placement year. I’m currently considering LSE/KCL as top choices and most likely some with slightly lower entry requirements incase I miss out on an A*
How refreshing to read this - someone who's actually thought about things and decided that Oxbridge isn't going to suit them or be what they want to get out of university.
(Original post by el474)
I’m currently trying to prepare a Law personal statement and I’m worried about things I can include related to law as a subject. Up until a few weeks ago I was planning on applying for something different.

I’m currently reading How British Law Is Failing Women by Helena Kennedy, I’ve seen a few posts on here about common law books that I will probably try to read at some point, however I wouldn’t want to include them in my PS because they are so common. Any other book recommendations?

I’ve also enrolled in a free virtual lawyer experience with Slaughter and May online as there’s no real work experience available this year, though I don’t know what it’s worth.

I was planning on framing my personal statement around feminism (hence my first book choice) but would that be a bad idea if I’m applying to top unis? It’s the most personal I can make a PS, however I could try making up something different if that wouldn’t be perceived well by unis. I’m hoping to get some time with a tutor in college to discuss this but as it’s summer I’m not expecting replies from teachers.

Thanks!
In the end, law is an academic endeavour at university, not vocational training. It's important to show a deep and wide interest in your subject, but I think you're in danger of being a bit too performative here, and 'collecting' things to put in a PS. It's much more important to be reflective and show that you've actually thought deeply about what you've read, and the areas of law which interest you - again, from an academic rather than vocational perspective.

Please don't 'make something up' for your PS based on some perceived notion of 'what they are looking for'. This will just come across as inauthentic and artificial. What good universities are looking for is that you're intelligent, literate, able to deal with uncertainty and fine, nice judgements, have an ability for hard work, able to digest large volumes of written material quickly - these sorts of things. Essentially, don't try to be too clever with it!
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leviticus.
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(Original post by el474)
I’m just looking for a little more practical information about the lawyer world, rather than just academic. It’s no matter if unis aren’t fussed.

Oxbridge isn’t my thing, I’m looking for unis that have a good practical aspect to their course as well as the rigorous academics, such as in a placement year. I’m currently considering LSE/KCL as top choices and most likely some with slightly lower entry requirements incase I miss out on an A*
Define practical, afaik law in the UK isn't vocational (you don't even need to study law to become a lawyer) so KCL and LSE will largely still be very theoretical and academic, not too dissimilar to oxbridge outside of the oxbridge specific features. If you wanna work in corp law you'll be applying to to first year insights and then vacation schemes to get a job at top firms, years in placement aren't directly going to benefit this more than the Oxbridge brand name would I imagine. Also, LSE/KCL don't do placement years iirc? Writing off Oxbridge is fine but its largely the uni brand that will get your foot in the door in regards to landing a VC rather than how "practical" the course is there. Grain of salt.
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el474
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(Original post by Reality Check)
In the end, law is an academic endeavour at university, not vocational training. It's important to show a deep and wide interest in your subject, but I think you're in danger of being a bit too performative here, and 'collecting' things to put in a PS. It's much more important to be reflective and show that you've actually thought deeply about what you've read, and the areas of law which interest you - again, from an academic rather than vocational perspective.

Please don't 'make something up' for your PS based on some perceived notion of 'what they are looking for'. This will just come across as inauthentic and artificial. What good universities are looking for is that you're intelligent, literate, able to deal with uncertainty and fine, nice judgements, have an ability for hard work, able to digest large volumes of written material quickly - these sorts of things. Essentially, don't try to be too clever with it!
Thank you for the advice. In terms of ‘making it up’ it’s not something I want to do, I am just worried that a personal statement surrounding applying for law to help people would not be seen as well by a top uni such as in comparison to a student who confidently wants to do x type of law
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Interrobang
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You will have to study different aspects of law for undergrad, but you don't need to talk about being a lawyer in your PS
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