sarsar_
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i have to write my personal statement soon as im going into year 13, but i have NO idea about what i wanna do in the future, i have no ambitions, no interest, no nothing. i tried doing those quizzes online but they dont give me any careers that interest me. anyone know what else i can do?
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PQ
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How do you feel about your current subjects?
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sarsar_
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(Original post by PQ)
How do you feel about your current subjects?
biology is definitely one of my interests and i like it but its the subject that im doing worst in so im not sure as im starting to lose interest as i get worse...
psychology is my best subject for sure but i dont think i want that to be my career you know??
maths is alright and i dont think im doing too bad in it and i dont hate it
i used to really like bio but my mock grades made me lose motivation to even look at a single topic
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PQ
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(Original post by sarsar_)
biology is definitely one of my interests and i like it but its the subject that im doing worst in so im not sure as im starting to lose interest as i get worse...
psychology is my best subject for sure but i dont think i want that to be my career you know??
maths is alright and i dont think im doing too bad in it and i dont hate it
i used to really like bio but my mock grades made me lose motivation to even look at a single topic
You have lots of options that aren’t available at A level.

Is there any specific areas in bio that you have enjoyed (and which bits are you struggling with?)

Most psychology grads don’t work in psychology. The main employment they go into is human resources and market research - there’s some excellent skills and knowledge crossover into both careers.

How do you feel about things like marine biology, environmental science, geology, demographics, criminology?
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artful_lounger
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It may be worth noting that at degree level many psychology courses are quite scientific and may have a fair bit of biological content. So that might fit your strengths and your interests quite well! Also a related course that integrates these two areas is neuroscience - although most neuroscience courses require A-level Chemistry as a prerequisite, some do not (particularly joint honours courses with psychology) so that may also be something to explore.

Another subject area that may be of interest which isn't available at A-level is anthropology - while most UK anthropology courses focus on social/cultural anthropology some also include biological/physical anthropology (and some focus very much on that, being specifically courses in biological/evolutionary anthropology). That might be a subject area you could explore a bit to see if you think the topics anthropologists study (both social/cultural and biological anthropologists) are of interest.

As above doing a psychology (or any) degree does not necessarily lock you into a particular career route or even job sector; most graduates work in areas unrelated to their degrees, and most grad schemes do not require or prefer any particular degree subject(s). So it might be more helpful to focus more on the subjects you enjoy currently, the ways of working and learning in those subjects you enjoy, and identifying some areas of intellectual interest to you which match up with those ways of working you prefer. The career stuff will come out later - you don't need to have that all figured out now.
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sarsar_
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(Original post by PQ)
You have lots of options that aren’t available at A level.

Is there any specific areas in bio that you have enjoyed (and which bits are you struggling with?)

Most psychology grads don’t work in psychology. The main employment they go into is human resources and market research - there’s some excellent skills and knowledge crossover into both careers.

How do you feel about things like marine biology, environmental science, geology, demographics, criminology?
i enjoy learning about exchange surfaces and animal transport systems, biodiversity, cell division and evolution, the rest im struggling (plants, disease, membranes, enzymes and microscopy). ive also always liked learning about the brain, havent learnt about it in sixth form bio yet but i have in gcse and psychology a level and i enjoyed it

criminology is definitely an interest for me ive always been into that kinds of stuff, correct me if im wrong but that relates to forensics and stuff??? ive also been interested in that. ive also looked into architecture since maths is a close second when it comes to my fav subjects
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sarsar_
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It may be worth noting that at degree level many psychology courses are quite scientific and may have a fair bit of biological content. So that might fit your strengths and your interests quite well! Also a related course that integrates these two areas is neuroscience - although most neuroscience courses require A-level Chemistry as a prerequisite, some do not (particularly joint honours courses with psychology) so that may also be something to explore.

Another subject area that may be of interest which isn't available at A-level is anthropology - while most UK anthropology courses focus on social/cultural anthropology some also include biological/physical anthropology (and some focus very much on that, being specifically courses in biological/evolutionary anthropology). That might be a subject area you could explore a bit to see if you think the topics anthropologists study (both social/cultural and biological anthropologists) are of interest.

As above doing a psychology (or any) degree does not necessarily lock you into a particular career route or even job sector; most graduates work in areas unrelated to their degrees, and most grad schemes do not require or prefer any particular degree subject(s). So it might be more helpful to focus more on the subjects you enjoy currently, the ways of working and learning in those subjects you enjoy, and identifying some areas of intellectual interest to you which match up with those ways of working you prefer. The career stuff will come out later - you don't need to have that all figured out now.
yeah actually ive looked into clinical psychology, psychiatry and forensic psychology which i think all involve bio? the problem is (correct me if im wrong) they take more than 4 years in uni and like a phD?? and i dont know if i want to do that </3 plus they need chemistry i think?? i hate chemistry

anthropology sounds interesting but ive read that its a useless degree? if i choose to study it do i have to strictly become an anthropologist and nothing else with the degree? thats good to know, thank you, its just that all my teachers are telling me that i shouldve figured everything out by now so im stressing haha
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by sarsar_)
yeah actually ive looked into clinical psychology, psychiatry and forensic psychology which i think all involve bio? the problem is (correct me if im wrong) they take more than 4 years in uni and like a phD?? and i dont know if i want to do that </3 plus they need chemistry i think?? i hate chemistry

anthropology sounds interesting but ive read that its a useless degree? if i choose to study it do i have to strictly become an anthropologist and nothing else with the degree? thats good to know, thank you, its just that all my teachers are telling me that i shouldve figured everything out by now so im stressing haha
Psychiatry is a medical specialty and requires you get a medical degree. Clinical psychology requires a DClinPsy, I think there is a similar equivalent qualification for forensic psychology. Both require a BPS accredited psychology degree, although are very competitive otherwise. Neither of the latter two require chemistry, medical degrees usually do although some do not.

You seem to have missed my point which is that most graduates do not do anything related to their first degree, and most graduate roles require no specific degree. You can just as well go into investment banking as an academic career in anthropology, as going into the media or civil service or many other roles, with an anthropology degree. Or a psychology degree, or any other degree. You need to move out of the mindset that degree = career. This isn't true for any degree except allied healthcare professions, medicine, dentistry, and vet med. No other degree necessarily links to any other career, even ostensibly professional courses like law, architecture, engineering etc - many graduates of those subjects don't go into the associated professions (sometimes even if they want to).
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sarsar_
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Psychiatry is a medical specialty and requires you get a medical degree. Clinical psychology requires a DClinPsy, I think there is a similar equivalent qualification for forensic psychology. Both require a BPS accredited psychology degree, although are very competitive otherwise. Neither of the latter two require chemistry, medical degrees usually do although some do not.

You seem to have missed my point which is that most graduates do not do anything related to their first degree, and most graduate roles require no specific degree. You can just as well go into investment banking as an academic career in anthropology, as going into the media or civil service or many other roles, with an anthropology degree. Or a psychology degree, or any other degree. You need to move out of the mindset that degree = career. This isn't true for any degree except allied healthcare professions, medicine, dentistry, and vet med. No other degree necessarily links to any other career, even ostensibly professional courses like law, architecture, engineering etc - many graduates of those subjects don't go into the associated professions (sometimes even if they want to).
hmm alright ill definitely keep that in mind, thank you!
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