Ability to Work a Part-time Job Despite Uni Workload

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I'm aiming to study engineering as an international student soon and am aware that I'm limited to 20 hours of work in a part-time job, but was wondering if that is even feasible considering the work-load of engineering courses..
0
reply
Keele Postgraduate
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm aiming to study engineering as an international student soon and am aware that I'm limited to 20 hours of work in a part-time job, but was wondering if that is even feasible considering the work-load of engineering courses.
It's difficult to say exactly without knowing your exact course requirements.

I'm currently doing my PhD in English Literature and I work, on average, between 7-15 hours per week on top of the PhD. During my MA, I had a weekend job (7 hours per week) and worked a couple of flexible jobs (around 5 hours per week). And during my undergraduate programme, I had part-time roles of about 15-20 hours per week. Throughout all of those, I've prioritised my studies so work hasn't prevented me from attending classes, submitting assignments etc. So it's certainly possible to work alongside your studies.

That said, I know some of my friends who were on science courses didn't feel they could hold down a part-time job and keep up with their classes, labs, assessments etc - so they tended to work during holidays from university and then not have a job during term time. It really depends on both your timetable/workload and you as a person - we all learn at our own pace and can comfortably handle different levels of workload and commitments.

The key thing for me is that the roles I've worked are flexible and I've worked for understanding employers who are used to relying on student staff and understand what sort of study commitments they have. During my undergraduate degree, for example, I worked in a restaurant in an evening - so I knew I would be able to attend classes in the day - and had a zero hours contract. So whilst I had no guarantee of being offered work, I also wasn't under an obligation to take a shift if I had university commitments/exams etc. Nowadays, I work a couple of 2.5 hour contracts online as a Student Ambassador for my university, plus I'm a sessional lecturer during term time. As I'm working for a university, they understand the need for balance between my studies and paid work.

I'd definitely recommend looking for work within your university if you can get it - either as a Student Ambassador, or in the campus bars/restaurants/shops. Most universities also have a dedicated jobshop for students where employers are specifically advertising for student staff. Paid internships (usually advertised by the careers service) are another option for shorter periods of paid employment. You can also keep an eye out on campus for paid opportunities to be involved in research studies - the pay is usually only a few pounds or a gift voucher but every little helps and you're usually only required to work for an hour or two!

Hope that helps!

Amy Louise
3
reply
Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Keele Postgraduate)
It's difficult to say exactly without knowing your exact course requirements.

I'm currently doing my PhD in English Literature and I work, on average, between 7-15 hours per week on top of the PhD. During my MA, I had a weekend job (7 hours per week) and worked a couple of flexible jobs (around 5 hours per week). And during my undergraduate programme, I had part-time roles of about 15-20 hours per week. Throughout all of those, I've prioritised my studies so work hasn't prevented me from attending classes, submitting assignments etc. So it's certainly possible to work alongside your studies.

That said, I know some of my friends who were on science courses didn't feel they could hold down a part-time job and keep up with their classes, labs, assessments etc - so they tended to work during holidays from university and then not have a job during term time. It really depends on both your timetable/workload and you as a person - we all learn at our own pace and can comfortably handle different levels of workload and commitments.

The key thing for me is that the roles I've worked are flexible and I've worked for understanding employers who are used to relying on student staff and understand what sort of study commitments they have. During my undergraduate degree, for example, I worked in a restaurant in an evening - so I knew I would be able to attend classes in the day - and had a zero hours contract. So whilst I had no guarantee of being offered work, I also wasn't under an obligation to take a shift if I had university commitments/exams etc. Nowadays, I work a couple of 2.5 hour contracts online as a Student Ambassador for my university, plus I'm a sessional lecturer during term time. As I'm working for a university, they understand the need for balance between my studies and paid work.

I'd definitely recommend looking for work within your university if you can get it - either as a Student Ambassador, or in the campus bars/restaurants/shops. Most universities also have a dedicated jobshop for students where employers are specifically advertising for student staff. Paid internships (usually advertised by the careers service) are another option for shorter periods of paid employment. You can also keep an eye out on campus for paid opportunities to be involved in research studies - the pay is usually only a few pounds or a gift voucher but every little helps and you're usually only required to work for an hour or two!

Hope that helps!

Amy Louise
It definitely does, much appreciated!
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
I was studying engineering and did work part-time, although the uni I was at (Exeter) was a bit of a lightweight when it came to engineering so the course was a bit less intense than others (to the disappointment of some of the academic staff!). However in principle I think it's feasible, the main thing is the hours you are working and fitting them around your timetable - if you are going to be working shifts in the week it gets more and more difficult to keep on top of things as you balance your contact hours with your work hours. Also if you are working late night finishes it does tend to become worse over time and make more of a difference than just working e.g. day shifts on weekends, because it affects your sleep and that in turn affects everything else. So be careful about what you do decide to pursue!
2
reply
Uni of Hull Students
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm aiming to study engineering as an international student soon and am aware that I'm limited to 20 hours of work in a part-time job, but was wondering if that is even feasible considering the work-load of engineering courses..
Hi Anonymous

I don't see that it would be an issue, here at Hull I have had plenty of colleagues in the Student Ambassadors team who have been studying Engineering in various forms. Take a look at your universities website and see if they have an ask a student scheme, you may find current engineering students who can advise you.

Best of luck

Chris
University of Hull Student Rep
1
reply
2ndThisIs
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Thank you artful_lounger and Uni of Hull Students! This is quite reassuring but insightful as well, will look further.
0
reply
LittleBear04
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
It depends on the complexity of the course you are studying and ultimately 'how well' you could manage the workload. In 1st year I worked 20 hours a week, from 2nd onwards I did around 10-15 hours and managed, I studied a Tourism Degree, so entirely different to OP.

However, keep in mind you wish to provide time to socialise and meet friends, so perhaps consider this when picking shifts.
1
reply
2ndThisIs
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by LittleBear04)
It depends on the complexity of the course you are studying and ultimately 'how well' you could manage the workload. In 1st year I worked 20 hours a week, from 2nd onwards I did around 10-15 hours and managed, I studied a Tourism Degree, so entirely different to OP.

However, keep in mind you wish to provide time to socialise and meet friends, so perhaps consider this when picking shifts.
I'll keep that in mind if I am to study there, thank you
0
reply
University of Portsmouth Student Rep
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm aiming to study engineering as an international student soon and am aware that I'm limited to 20 hours of work in a part-time job, but was wondering if that is even feasible considering the work-load of engineering courses..
Hi there,

I completed a Biology degree and now conducting a full time Masters in Research and have been able to work part-time. The only thing you have to be careful of your time management to ensure you don't overwhelm yourself but you can always start working and see how you cope with it.

I hope this helps
Loren Snowden
UoP Student Ambassador
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (14)
6.64%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (34)
16.11%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (34)
16.11%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (31)
14.69%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (57)
27.01%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (41)
19.43%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise