How frequent change of employment looks good on a resume for a person in their 20s?

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username1240252
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Let's say a 26 year old graduate changes companies every:
- Less than 6 months
- 6 months
- 1 year
- 18 months
- 2 years

Does it make a difference when applying for another job and to what extent?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Robert Walpole)
Let's say a 26 year old graduate changes companies every:
- Less than 6 months
- 6 months
- 1 year
- 18 months
- 2 years

Does it make a difference when applying for another job and to what extent?
Just to note that unless you are American, we use the phrase 'CV', not 'resumé'.
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username1240252
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Just to note that unless you are American, we use the phrase 'CV', not 'resumé'.
Fair point
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gjd800
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I stayed at a couple of jobs fewer than a month back in 08-09 :lol:
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username1240252
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(Original post by gjd800)
I stayed at a couple of jobs fewer than a month back in 08-09 :lol:
Wow thank you for sharing this experience and actually I wanted to ask this exact question - what do you then do with that experience? How do you outline it on your applications etc? Do you list those less than 1 month jobs individually and explain the context on your applications?
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Final Fantasy
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Depends if it's a contract or permanent role. If perm, then it can be seen as job hopping and a red flag. If contract, that's quite normal since contracts have a start and end date (with extensions).
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 1 month ago
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gjd800
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(Original post by Robert Walpole)
Wow thank you for sharing this experience and actually I wanted to ask this exact question - what do you then do with that experience? How do you outline it on your applications etc? Do you list those less than 1 month jobs individually and explain the context on your applications?
I lumped em under one head, something like 'short term contract work' and nobody ever really cared

I don't put them on since I've started using an 'academuc cv', so no problem!
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username1240252
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Depends if it's a contract or permanent role. If perm, then it can be seen as job hopping and a red flag. If contract, that's quite normal since contracts have a start and end date (with extensions).
And would you say after approximately what period of time would it not be a 'red flag' as such to move from a permanent contract from let's say a "junior" role at bank A to a mid-level analyst role at bank B? For bank B or any future employer not to see it as a red flag as such? Is a year sufficient or more like 18 months - 2 years+?
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by Robert Walpole)
And would you say after approximately what period of time would it not be a 'red flag' as such to move from a permanent contract from let's say a "junior" role at bank A to a mid-level analyst role at bank B? For bank B or any future employer not to see it as a red flag as such? Is a year sufficient or more like 18 months - 2 years+?
They won't care as long as you do not have significant employment gaps. Employment gaps are a lot more scrutinised than multiple employments. Definitely be prepared to explain exactly why you left your previous workplace during the interviews. Depending on the reason, they'll be fine with it or won't. Almost all employers will ask for reasons leaving your previous workplace.

Checking my LinkedIn right now it looks like I've worked in 10 different companies, and a few others I haven't even listed. Never had any problems with that. I am always in continuous employment or otherwise on holiday, I have zero employment gaps and never had to explain any gaps in my employment history to anyone because it didn't exist.
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 1 month ago
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username1240252
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
They won't care as long as you do not have significant employment gaps. Employment gaps are a lot more scrutinised than multiple employments. Definitely be prepared to explain exactly why you left your previous workplace during the interviews. Depending on the reason, they'll be fine with it or won't.

Checking my LinkedIn right now it looks like I've worked in 10 different companies, and a few others I haven't even listed. Never had any problems with that. I am always in continuous employment or otherwise on holiday, I have zero employment gaps and never had to explain any gaps in my employment history to anyone because it didn't exist.
That is amazingly impressive - 10 different companies and no gaps

Approximately how often did you change companies and was it because you wanted a higher position at the next company as compared to the one from which you would have departed? How long was your shortest employment that you still list and how long was the longest if you don't mind me asking - this is really just out of curiousity because although I am currently very much employed I am also applying for other positions
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by Robert Walpole)
That is amazingly impressive - 10 different companies and no gaps

Approximately how often did you change companies and was it because you wanted a higher position at the next company as compared to the one from which you would have departed? How long was your shortest employment that you still list and how long was the longest if you don't mind me asking - this is really just out of curiousity because although I am currently very much employed I am also applying for other positions
I change companies all the time, usually for one or more of the following reasons:

- I felt that I wasn't earning enough
- I want a more senior position
- It becomes repetitive
- Business doesn't address the concerns my team and I have
- Business coming under severe financial difficulty and it impacts my team and I

I think it's probably been about 12 - 15 companies overall. I always make sure I got a couple of confirmed offers, a contract of employment in place, and only then do I give in my notice. I never hand in my notice unless I have secured employment elsewhere and it's a done deal.

Whenever I am in employment, I keep engaged with recruiters on LinkedIn in case I wanna find a new role because the business gave me a false impression during interview and are actually under financial difficulty or other serious problems (this has happened a few times so I gotta protect myself).

You should not be scared of these companies. Do everything on your own terms, always. The business will never be on your side, it is purely operating on profit and revenue.

My shortest employment was 1 month, because they misled me at interview stage. I did not have a budget to hire other developers and engineers. I could not grow my team and half the IT department was resigning the same week I started. I immediately got back on LinkedIn and got some offers elsewhere. The longest was almost 2 years. Loyalty is a lie. Don't fall into that trap, no one cares about loyalty.

As long as you can justify why you left your previous workplace you will be fine (they never bother to check, it's all done via recruitment agencies anyway these days, even references are meaningless unless you're working in finance and compliance checks).

If you have employment gaps that you can't explain, that's the main concern. In fact, when I interview candidates to hire them, I ask the same questions myself because it's a red flag.
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 1 month ago
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DrSocSciences
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The adage used to be that you needed to work for 2yrs before jumping ship. I suspect that duration has reduced significantly in the last 10 years.
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Zarek
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Leaving too many jobs before you could reasonably be expected to have achieved much or on a timescale where there could be suspicion that you were booted out is not good
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