Mature student and already have my first degree that is outside of the UK

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CuriouslyThe0ne
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Hi there, I am writing this post is because I am applying for law next fall of 2022 and I am slowly getting in the habit of studying the LNAT this year. A little bit about myself, I am a 27-year-old from Canada who has their first degree at a university and is now embarking on my journey in applying to law school. My grade point average is average but I have been working for 3 years at my part-time job during the weekends while the weekdays I am studying for the LNAT. I recently bought Arbitio and did their free test a while ago and scored 13/42. I want to ask what are my chances in getting into a top school like Oxford, Leeds, Glasgow, and Durham just to name a few? Thanks
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anton31
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(Original post by CuriouslyThe0ne)
Hi there, I am writing this post is because I am applying for law next fall of 2022 and I am slowly getting in the habit of studying the LNAT this year. A little bit about myself, I am a 27-year-old from Canada who has their first degree at a university and is now embarking on my journey in applying to law school. My grade point average is average but I have been working for 3 years at my part-time job during the weekends while the weekdays I am studying for the LNAT. I recently bought Arbitio and did their free test a while ago and scored 13/42. I want to ask what are my chances in getting into a top school like Oxford, Leeds, Glasgow, and Durham just to name a few? Thanks

Getting into one of the top universities in the UK is impossible, but the competition is fearless. This is because many law firms favour graduates from good universities when offering training contracts etc.
The places you mentioned require a minimum of ABB on your A-levels (or equivalent) to consider an application. If you have good A-levels grades, your first degree is a bonus. The fact that you finished it already shows you get things done.
I was in a similar place last year.
If you really want something, go and get it!

Best of luck.
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CuriouslyThe0ne
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That's what I fear since I don't have many A-level, like maybe 2 A-level and the rest are decent levels. But I have done my degree which is something that I am hoping they would look at. I did read somewhere that even if I don't have A-level that I can explain myself or something through my personal statement or something like that. I could be wrong. I am also studying the LNAT and trying to grasp as much info as I can while doing the practice tests. It's been difficult for me to navigate the application process and signing up for the LNAT test date since I am new at everything. I applying to some that provide the LNAT and some that don't provide the LNAT and go from there.
How did you do since you were in a similar place last year?

Thanks
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anton31
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(Original post by CuriouslyThe0ne)
That's what I fear since I don't have many A-level, like maybe 2 A-level and the rest are decent levels. But I have done my degree which is something that I am hoping they would look at. I did read somewhere that even if I don't have A-level that I can explain myself or something through my personal statement or something like that. I could be wrong. I am also studying the LNAT and trying to grasp as much info as I can while doing the practice tests. It's been difficult for me to navigate the application process and signing up for the LNAT test date since I am new at everything. I applying to some that provide the LNAT and some that don't provide the LNAT and go from there.
How did you do since you were in a similar place last year?

Thanks
I’m a little older than you, but I was lucky to have the ABB I needed to get invited for the interview and test.
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etwelve
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Would you be doing a second undergrad in law? If you want to practice law, why not go straight to the law conversion and qualify? Law school doesn't work the same way in the UK that it does in the US/Canada.
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CuriouslyThe0ne
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(Original post by etwelve)
Would you be doing a second undergrad in law? If you want to practice law, why not go straight to the law conversion and qualify? Law school doesn't work the same way in the UK that it does in the US/Canada.
To expand my horizon a bit more since my major doesn't offer many jobs sadly and I do not want to go for my master's either to which I like law a lot more and would love to expand my knowledge a bit further. What is the law conversion? US/Canada uses their testing called LSAT and I can't do their test for some reason so the UK is more of a safer bet for me to do. Plus, I was planning on moving and working there.
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CuriouslyThe0ne
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(Original post by anton31)
I’m a little older than you, but I was lucky to have the ABB I needed to get invited for the interview and test.
Did you have to take the LNAT?
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etwelve
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(Original post by CuriouslyThe0ne)
To expand my horizon a bit more since my major doesn't offer many jobs sadly and I do not want to go for my master's either to which I like law a lot more and would love to expand my knowledge a bit further. What is the law conversion? US/Canada uses their testing called LSAT and I can't do their test for some reason so the UK is more of a safer bet for me to do. Plus, I was planning on moving and working there.
If you want to practice law in the UK, you need to complete the SQE, an exam to become a solicitor. You can choose to do the GDL (one year conversion course for non-law graduates to catch them up) in order to be ready for it. If you believe you have sufficient knowledge, you could take it without.

The universities you mentioned (Oxford, Durham etc) don't offer "law school" in the way you're imagining. They offer Masters and Postgraduate courses to continue studying and researching Law in an academic way only. Completing a postgraduate Law degree at Oxford will not qualify you to practice Law in the UK. An undergraduate degree in law from one of these places also would not qualify you, and you may as well take the one year GDL rather than a three year undergraduate. The only reason to attend one of these universities with the intention to practice Law would be at an undergraduate level if, for some reason, your degree didn't meet the entry requirements for British firms/courses. But this would be very expensive and probably unnecessary.

Your best bet is completing the GDL (which is not offered at top universities, mostly at specialist ones), and then take the SQE. If you get a Training Contract with a firm, they can potentially help fund everything you need to do, including the GDL and any course they put their trainees on for the SQE. They recruit two years in advance, so I would start looking ASAP.

Hope that helps!

Edit: when the other poster mentions A-Levels, they're talking about a qualification people take aged 18 in their last year of school. These are the grades that get them into university at Undergraduate level.
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camapplicant530
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What did you end up with in your degree? I have a very similar background to you (already have a degree) and am about to start at uni in September for law.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by camapplicant530)
What did you end up with in your degree? I have a very similar background to you (already have a degree) and am about to start at uni in September for law.
And did you receive an offer from Cambridge - your username would suggest you applied
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camapplicant530
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(Original post by Reality Check)
And did you receive an offer from Cambridge - your username would suggest you applied
I did in the end. Whether I'll actually be going is another matter, though - not massively confident about next Tuesday haha.

I took additional A-Levels as my degree was out of date for Cambridge.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by camapplicant530)
I did in the end. Whether I'll actually be going is another matter, though - not massively confident about next Tuesday haha.

I took additional A-Levels as my degree was out of date for Cambridge.
That's great news I did law at Cambridge, but this was pre-CLT days. When you say 'out of date', how old was your first degree? And how many A levels did they ask you to take?

Sorry to slightly derail, but I've seen you posting round about the law forums and was interested in your progress so far
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camapplicant530
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(Original post by Reality Check)
That's great news I did law at Cambridge, but this was pre-CLT days. When you say 'out of date', how old was your first degree? And how many A levels did they ask you to take?

Sorry to slightly derail, but I've seen you posting round about the law forums and was interested in your progress so far
No worries

So it's older than 4 years, I'd rather not be more specific as I'm pretty sure I'd be identifiable given the fact I'm going to one of the mature colleges. I took 3 through NEC (was asked to take three, this wasn't necessary for UCL; LSE for some weird reason said one was enough) and it honestly turned out to be a really good decision. I had a tough time at school the first time around so I really enjoyed having the opportunity to study subjects I was actually interested in; it also helped with my imposter syndrome.

The CLT this year was a bit weird as it was typed/done remotely. I think a lot of people had issues with the lack of invigilation but ho hum

To the OP: if you've got the money/time I wouldn't suggest doing the GDL. It's a super intense course and a law degree gives you the opportunity to have several bites of the cherry with regard to vac schemes. You'll also benefit from all the extra-curricular stuff. Also, if you find anything hard, you'll have the time to get it right - ditto for units you find interesting/want to pursue further.
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