Return on Investment for international students

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crazy_twist
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As an international student it will cost about 120,000 for my undergraduate. Is it worth the investment?
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markmm4226
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That depends on what course you apply for, what uni you want to go to, and what you want to get out of studying here. As they say, you only get back whatever you put in. If you come to study here with the assumption it may not be worth your money, then it probably isn’t the decision you should take.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Raisul_Bhuiya)
As an international student it will cost about 120,000 for my undergraduate. Is it worth the investment?
I agree with markmm4226

120k is a large amount of money that can be used to buy a house. I think the value and return on investment will depend on your plans afterwards. If you are going to be a doctor or an investment banker then you could earn the money and recoup your “losses”. However, if you end up in a standard job without a decent income then the money would have gone down the drain.

I’d suggest that you compare your potential trajectory after a uni education in your home country versus your planned uni. If it is worth it then go for it. Good luck.
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I agree with markmm4226

120k is a large amount of money that can be used to buy a house. I think the value and return on investment will depend on your plans afterwards. If you are going to be a doctor or an investment banker then you could earn the money and recoup your “losses”. However, if you end up in a standard job without a decent income then the money would have gone down the drain.

I’d suggest that you compare your potential trajectory after a uni education in your home country versus your planned uni. If it is worth it then go for it. Good luck.
What do you mean by a standard job and what income category are you putting it in?
I'm thinking about the long run and although my goal is to become an investment banker, I need to have backup options as it's not the easiest to get into.
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by markmm4226)
That depends on what course you apply for, what uni you want to go to, and what you want to get out of studying here. As they say, you only get back whatever you put in. If you come to study here with the assumption it may not be worth your money, then it probably isn’t the decision you should take.
UOM and I want to earn the money back in about 5-7 years in savings.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Raisul_Bhuiya)
What do you mean by a standard job and what income category are you putting it in?
I'm thinking about the long run and although my goal is to become an investment banker, I need to have backup options as it's not the easiest to get into.
I don't know your course but I mean that some courses might not have high earning potential after graduation.

If you plan to stay in the UK after your course, the average starting salary is about £26,000. You may be able to get into IB but it would be very competitive
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
I don't know your course but I mean that some courses might not have high earning potential after graduation.

If you plan to stay in the UK after your course, the average starting salary is about £26,000. You may be able to get into IB but it would be very competitive
My course is Accounting and Finance, do you think in the long run even if I get 26000 as a graduate, I will be able to recoup the money and have it in savings in 5-7 years?
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markmm4226
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Honestly, if you are thinking of this purely in terms of whether or not you can make a ‘return’ in a certain period of time, this decision probably isn’t for you.

When it comes to applying for university, the main reason you do so is to acquire a certain skillset or qualification which allows you to be eligible to work in a certain sector that you really want to be a part of.

Of course we would all like to also make a decent wage after university, but that is never ever guaranteed no matter what course you do. There are too many factors - such as how well you did at your degree (I.e what classification you achieve - 1st, 2nd, 3rd etc), where you choose to work in terms of the company and geographical location, and what your life style is like in terms of living expenses when out against your income. There is just no guarantee.

As someone interested in study abroad such as yourself, your main priorities would surely be the quality of education you receive and the experiences you have living in another country? If you are only doing this in order to ensure you ‘recoup’ your spendings, this isn’t the choice to make.

It is simply too vague and open ended a question to base your decision to move abroad on. If you are that worried about making a ‘return’ on your money, might we suggest you study somewhere closer to home, or somewhere you are eligible for grants and benefits?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Raisul_Bhuiya)
My course is Accounting and Finance, do you think in the long run even if I get 26000 as a graduate, I will be able to recoup the money and have it in savings in 5-7 years?
You will not make £120,000 in savings after 7 years on a 26k salary.

26k after tax is about 21k per year. That is about 1800 per month. If you take our rent, bills and other expenses, you could have £1000 at best. That is about 12k per year. That would be about 10 years to get 120k. That is if you are strict and saving £1000.

For your course, i think you would need to work at the Big 4 (pwc, deloitte, kpmg or EY) to earn decent wages.
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
You will not make £120,000 in savings after 7 years on a 26k salary.

26k after tax is about 21k per year. That is about 1800 per month. If you take our rent, bills and other expenses, you could have £1000 at best. That is about 12k per year. That would be about 10 years to get 120k. That is if you are strict and saving £1000.

For your course, i think you would need to work at the Big 4 (pwc, deloitte, kpmg or EY) to earn decent wages.
I'm talking about a starting salary of 26k, I'm pretty sure that once a career is started I will be promoted and make higher wages with raises, looking at stats it shows that 85% of graduates make 25k as a graduate and after 3 years make 35k, with a range of 25-40k.

I would prefer to work in the finance sector instead of accounting.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Raisul_Bhuiya)
I'm talking about a starting salary of 26k, I'm pretty sure that once a career is started I will be promoted and make higher wages with raises, looking at stats it shows that 85% of graduates make 25k as a graduate and after 3 years make 35k, with a range of 25-40k.

I would prefer to work in the finance sector instead of accounting.
You could save the 120k in Finance but it will be more competitive. Many people want to get into finance esp from other top unis like Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, Imperial etc.
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ajj2000
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I doubt you can pay back £120k - certainly if you apply interest - the route you are looking at. firstly you are assuming that you would get a job and work visa for the UK. What would the salary level be like in India? How many people studying A+F at Manchester get jobs in the city? Dunno - a handful a year? I suspect physics/ engineering grads from Manchester fare better.
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I doubt you can pay back £120k - certainly if you apply interest - the route you are looking at. firstly you are assuming that you would get a job and work visa for the UK. What would the salary level be like in India? How many people studying A+F at Manchester get jobs in the city? Dunno - a handful a year? I suspect physics/ engineering grads from Manchester fare better.
Will I really struggle for a job?
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crazy_twist
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
You could save the 120k in Finance but it will be more competitive. Many people want to get into finance esp from other top unis like Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, Imperial etc.
Roughly what percent get ajob in finance in comparison to those that have applied? And what would I need to do to get a job there?
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Raisul_Bhuiya)
Will I really struggle for a job?
It depends on your visa status. Do you have a british passport?

The big thing is this - can you afford the £120k? What if you cannot repay? What would your career prospects be like in India?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by crazy_twist)
Roughly what percent get ajob in finance in comparison to those that have applied? And what would I need to do to get a job there?
I dont know that answer because the finance industry is diverse and includes asset management, investment banking, hedge funds, accounting and finance, mergers and acquisitions, investment management, corporate finance etc.

The big error that many young people make is assume that “finance” is one thing. It is not. You have to find a component of finance that interests you and you are qualified for then go for it.

To your question about how to get in, i think you need to start early. Look for opportunities from first year for internships, shadowing programme, placements, spring weeks etc at banks, hedge funds, asset managers and other financial houses. By your final year, many places would have been taken by the interns or placement hires.
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markmm4226
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(Original post by crazy_twist)
I'm talking about a starting salary of 26k, I'm pretty sure that once a career is started I will be promoted and make higher wages with raises, looking at stats it shows that 85% of graduates make 25k as a graduate and after 3 years make 35k, with a range of 25-40k.

I would prefer to work in the finance sector instead of accounting.
Unfortunately none of that is at all certain of secure. Every job market is volatile and subject to change. Nobody thought we would be in a worldwide lockdown with the worst economical downturn in human history, yet here we are.

It is much too vague to make assumptions you will make a certain wage, be promoted within a certain time, and manage your finances the way you think you would.

You just cannot be sure.

Statistics for graduate salaries are not something you should base your choice in course on, nor is it something you can rely on in terms of personal finances. Just because a statistic says you will make £25K and be promoted within a certain time, what makes you think that will be true for you? It sounds harsh, but you simply cannot assume what will happen based on statistics like these - a whole motivation for these statistics is to lure people into their courses.

As previously said, if the main thing you are concerned about is paying the money back in a certain way by a certain time, this is not for you.
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artful_lounger
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Depends on which uni you go to. To be perfectly blunt, for an international student paying that much for many unis in the UK, even very good ones, you might be better off looking at options in your home country or somewhere else that is cheaper (e.g. Europe).

Although university rankings tend to be somewhat questionable tools, for this specific purpose due to the huge sums of money involved I think that they are somewhat useful because they are quite blunt instruments, and that really only the top few unis are going to be worth that investment (i.e. Oxbridge, Imperial, or LSE, depending on your subject area).

For subject areas generally not taught by those unis (e.g. most creative/performing arts subjects, allied health professions, etc) you are probably better off studying outside of the UK for a lot less then moving here as an established professional in your field.
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