RetroSPECT3.0
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History, Maths, Economics.
I really like maths, so would Further Maths look good as an AS (Cos on the one hand, I like it, but on the other it would be really time consuming and not really relevant to law)? Or any other AS (Chemistry, Psychology, Biology, etc), or shall I stick to nailing these 3 subjects?
Also, I want to apply to top unis like Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, etc- do they care about EPQs? Our school promotes them but I've been told by many that those Unis don't care at all?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
History, Maths, Economics.
I really like maths, so would Further Maths look good as an AS (Cos on the one hand, I like it, but on the other it would be really time consuming and not really relevant to law)? Or any other AS (Chemistry, Psychology, Biology, etc), or shall I stick to nailing these 3 subjects?
Also, I want to apply to top unis like Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, etc- do they care about EPQs? Our school promotes them but I've been told by many that those Unis don't care at all?
History, maths and economics are fine for law, but for god's sake don't write them with a capital letter on your PS.

EPQs - meh. Getting A*A*A or higher is the main thing - I think EPQs are a bit frivolous really, and seem to end up being mandated by schools and colleges for no particular reason. If you've really got a topic you want to 'research', then maybe think about an EPQ. Otherwise, I'd stick to the three subjects you've indicated.
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by Reality Check)
History, maths and economics are fine for law, but for god's sake don't write them with a capital letter on your PS.

EPQs - meh. Getting A*A*A or higher is the main thing - I think EPQs are a bit frivolous really, and seem to end up being mandated by schools and colleges for no particular reason. If you've really got a topic you want to 'research', then maybe think about an EPQ. Otherwise, I'd stick to the three subjects you've indicated.
Nice thank you! And I wont, so long as you capitalise 'God' aswell🤣. But yeah, I'm not particularly passionate about some random EPQ, and I'd rather write something about a law book or a legal case in my PS, but I was asking, purely in case it increases my chance of getting an offer!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
Nice thank you! And I wont, so long as you capitalise 'God' aswell🤣.
:laugh: I like that.

But yeah, I'm not particularly passionate about some random EPQ, and I'd rather write something about a law book or a legal case in my PS, but I was asking, purely in case it increases my chance of getting an offer!
100% agree that it would be much better to skip the EPQ if there's nothing that you particularly want to do. I really don't think an EPQ would be the difference between receiving and offer and not receiving one. Stellar A level grades and a good PS showing thoughtfulness, reflection on what you're read and an appreciation of law as an academic endeavour (cf. the 'vocational training approach) will stand you in much better stead.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
History, Maths, Economics.
I really like maths, so would Further Maths look good as an AS (Cos on the one hand, I like it, but on the other it would be really time consuming and not really relevant to law)? Or any other AS (Chemistry, Psychology, Biology, etc), or shall I stick to nailing these 3 subjects?
Also, I want to apply to top unis like Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, etc- do they care about EPQs? Our school promotes them but I've been told by many that those Unis don't care at all?
History, maths and economics are good choices. I'd stick with those.
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cleveranimal56
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If it helps, I want to do law as well and chose: English lit, maths, further maths and economics for A level. So the only difference if the history thing and my teachers told me that it was a really good combination
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harrysbar
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
History, Maths, Economics.
I really like maths, so would Further Maths look good as an AS (Cos on the one hand, I like it, but on the other it would be really time consuming and not really relevant to law)? Or any other AS (Chemistry, Psychology, Biology, etc), or shall I stick to nailing these 3 subjects?
Also, I want to apply to top unis like Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, etc- do they care about EPQs? Our school promotes them but I've been told by many that those Unis don't care at all?
EPQs are useful for some unis to get a slightly reduced offer (ABB instead of AAB say) but at the A*AA level they aren't really used. I would stick with 3 subjects (forget the FM which won't help) - yours are good subjects - and get the best grades you can because they will be looking for A*AA predictions, and a good LNAT score too.
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by cleveranimal56)
If it helps, I want to do law as well and chose: English lit, maths, further maths and economics for A level. So the only difference if the history thing and my teachers told me that it was a really good combination
I supposed what I've deduced from this thread (and some friends) is that its best to cut out further maths altogether then? Like I understand if you dont want to (cos I really like maths aswell) but apparently, maths and further maths swallow up about 70-80%of your revision.
From what I've read, english literature is more critical than history but the content is definitely less, so maybe you can pull off further maths, though I'd definitely think you'd be happier and in a better chance dropping it.
I dont know though, maybe some other 'TSR-ers' can help out?😅
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by harrysbar)
EPQs are useful for some unis to get a slightly reduced offer (ABB instead of AAB say) but at the A*AA level they aren't really used. I would stick with 3 subjects (forget the FM which won't help) - yours are good subjects - and get the best grades you can because they will be looking for A*AA predictions, and a good LNAT score too.
What is a good LNAT score? Is it a set score, or do they look at it holistically with your A-Levels/PS? Like I keep getting in the 20-24 range, so idk if that's good or bad...
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harrysbar
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
What is a good LNAT score? Is it a set score, or do they look at it holistically with your A-Levels/PS? Like I keep getting in the 20-24 range, so idk if that's good or bad...
These will give you some idea what is required by different unis

https://www.thelawyerportal.com/free...e/lnat-scores/

https://www.arbitio.co.uk/guides/lnat_university_scores

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6670292
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McGinger
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For LNAT, mid-20s in MCQ is a 'good score', few people get over 30 in this component.
The majority of LNAT Unis also look at the essay component and this will be marked in-house using that Uni's criteria.
These scores will be combined to give your overal score for that Uni.

This is the scoring % for Bristol - GCSE 20% | A-Level 40% | LNAT 40%
and Bristol uses these weightings for LNAT - 60% multiple choice questions and 40% essay.
Other Unis will be different.
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RetroSPECT3.0
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(Original post by McGinger)
For LNAT, mid-20s in MCQ is a 'good score', few people get over 30 in this component.
The majority of LNAT Unis also look at the essay component and this will be marked in-house using that Uni's criteria.
These scores will be combined to give your overal score for that Uni.

This is the scoring % for Bristol - GCSE 20% | A-Level 40% | LNAT 40%
and Bristol uses these weightings for LNAT - 60% multiple choice questions and 40% essay.
Other Unis will be different.
How much weighting does Oxford or UCL give to each of these?
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EOData
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
How much weighting does Oxford or UCL give to each of these?
A quick Google reveals UCL says this: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/study/und...y-requirements
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McGinger
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
How much weighting does Oxford or UCL give to each of these?
If its not on the website or there is no link to this sort of info, then email the Admissions office and ask.
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heccyeah
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(Original post by RetroSPECT3.0)
History, Maths, Economics.
I really like maths, so would Further Maths look good as an AS (Cos on the one hand, I like it, but on the other it would be really time consuming and not really relevant to law)? Or any other AS (Chemistry, Psychology, Biology, etc), or shall I stick to nailing these 3 subjects?
Also, I want to apply to top unis like Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, etc- do they care about EPQs? Our school promotes them but I've been told by many that those Unis don't care at all?
Though one thing I might consider if I were you is how set are you on law? If you are completely set on it, then FM isn’t necessary, however you said that you really like maths, so if you think there’s a chance you might change your mind and do maths or some other similar subject at uni then keeping FM to AS might be something to think about.
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