Kings vs London met…

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
I have been accepted to study biomedical Science in Kings college

My initial plan was to then study a postgraduate in dietetics as kings no longer offer it as an undergraduate

Realistically my best plan would be to go straight in for a undergraduate in dietetics; money, time, stress…


The only London university that offers dietetics is London met. I’d prefer to stay within London for personal reasons, but I’ve been reading that London met aren’t isn’t the best (e.g. admin staff not replying and forcing students into another year of study)

I have been considering surrey; but it wouldn’t be ideal.

is London met truly that bad?
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Anonymous #2
#2
Report 10 months ago
#2
Do kings as it's a Russel group uni and London met isn't good..
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ajj2000
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
Realistically my best plan would be to go straight in for a undergraduate in dietetics; money, time, stress…
how old are you? this makes a big difference. Also - is funding available for the postgrad dietetics course?
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Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
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(Original post by ajj2000)
how old are you? this makes a big difference. Also - is funding available for the postgrad dietetics course?
22 but going in for an undergraduate; the money regards the 5000 grant as an NHS course, which doesn’t apply to biomed
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Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
22 but going in for an undergraduate; the money regards the 5000 grant as an NHS course, which doesn’t apply to biomed
And of course with biomed, to subsequently peruse dietetics a total of 5 years would be required
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Anonymous #1
#6
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do kings as it's a Russel group uni and London met isn't good..
For what reasons though? Having difficulty finding real reasons for why London met is still considered poor
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ajj2000
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
22 but going in for an undergraduate; the money regards the 5000 grant as an NHS course, which doesn’t apply to biomed
Ah- that makes a big difference. Far more reason to go straight into the career based course. So your choice is a 4 year undergrad degree or to do a three year undergrad elsewhere in a suitable subject and then a one year specialist masters degree to become a dietician?

You need to be sceptical when people refer to general university rankings for healthcare type courses. These just don't work in the same way as more standard degrees. The important thing is to check whether the course you are looking at is good. This means checking with current students and people who work in the field.
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Anonymous #1
#8
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Actually a 3 year versus a 5 year;

Going to kings: biomed for 3 years (undergrad) and then a masters in dietetics for 2 years; there aren’t any postgraduate degrees that last 1 year to become a dietitian.
So by doing that; 2 years with the grant, 3 without

I know most courses don’t offer the grant but when it’s comparing 5 years (2 with grant) versus simply 3 years that are all funded to achieve the same outcome (RD) then it does make a difference for sure.

I still feel silly that I will likely reject kings, applied as a joke at the beginning of the access course, but it makes no logical sense to do 3 years just for the name sake

Thank you so much for the comment; will definitely try and contact someone now.

Just one question, does the place of study have an impact on the interviews’ decision in hiring a RD?
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ajj2000
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
Just one question, does the place of study have an impact on the interviews’ decision in hiring a RD?
Not my field I’m afraid. I’ve been told that recruiters do have a perception of courses in areas like dentistry and physio (these have absolutely no correlation to tsr university rankings - it really is about the type and quality of training). I suspect that some courses have a good name - I’m afraid I don’t know how you might find out other than reaching out for advice from current practitioners.
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Ldn17
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Anonymous)
I have been accepted to study biomedical Science in Kings college

My initial plan was to then study a postgraduate in dietetics as kings no longer offer it as an undergraduate

Realistically my best plan would be to go straight in for a undergraduate in dietetics; money, time, stress…


The only London university that offers dietetics is London met. I’d prefer to stay within London for personal reasons, but I’ve been reading that London met aren’t isn’t the best (e.g. admin staff not replying and forcing students into another year of study)

I have been considering surrey; but it wouldn’t be ideal.

is London met truly that bad?
Hi,
I’m a second year dietetics student at London Met. I can tell you first hand that this course at London met is to an incredibly high standard. Lecturers (dietitians themselves) are very supportive and I couldn’t be happier with studying at this uni.
Last edited by Ldn17; 10 months ago
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Anonymous #1
#11
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#11
(Original post by Ldn17)
Hi,
I’m a second year dietetics student at London Met. I can tell you first hand that this course at London met is to an incredibly high standard. Lecturers (dietitians themselves) are very supportive and I couldn’t be happier with studying at this uni.
Oh wow- thank you so much for this!!

I’ve been really worried about applying there based on the reviews, but similarly couldn’t find anyone to ask directly

This really helps- thank you so much!
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Ldn17
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#12
Report 10 months ago
#12
(Original post by Anonymous)
Oh wow- thank you so much for this!!

I’ve been really worried about applying there based on the reviews, but similarly couldn’t find anyone to ask directly

This really helps- thank you so much!
You’re welcome! Feel free to message me if you have any questions. Dietetics is very competitive , I can assure you the degree at London met is professional and what better learning then getting hands on experience at London hospitals for placement good luck!
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University of Surrey Student Rep
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#13
Report 10 months ago
#13
(Original post by Anonymous)
I have been accepted to study biomedical Science in Kings college

My initial plan was to then study a postgraduate in dietetics as kings no longer offer it as an undergraduate

Realistically my best plan would be to go straight in for a undergraduate in dietetics; money, time, stress…


The only London university that offers dietetics is London met. I’d prefer to stay within London for personal reasons, but I’ve been reading that London met aren’t isn’t the best (e.g. admin staff not replying and forcing students into another year of study)

I have been considering surrey; but it wouldn’t be ideal.

is London met truly that bad?
Hi there,

To introduce myself – I’m Joao, starting next semester I will be in my final year studying BSc Economics at Surrey University while working as a Campus Ambassador for JP Morgan. I recently finished my one-year industrial placement as an Economist for the British Government’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). I also had the opportunity to work as a Private Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Biosecurity.

If you are accepted in our Nutrition and Dietetics BSc (Hons), you will study on one of our longest-running courses, ranked 2nd in the UK by The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021 and 4th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2022. This will give you access to our £10 million Innovation for Health Learning Laboratory and use equipment found in NHS research facilities and will allow you to complete three integrated clinical placements in the NHS to acquire a wealth of practical experience, under the supervision of qualified dietitians. You will also get the academic requirements needed to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to work as a dietitian once you’ve graduated.

In this course, you’ll learn to help prevent and treat disease as a registered dietitian, responding to the diverse needs of patients, families and carers, within a variety of settings. You’ll understand how food intake and dietary requirements can be altered by illness and you’ll be able to translate nutritional science and information about food, into practical dietary advice. This advice can be aimed at the general public to promote health or in a clinical environment to treat a wide range of medical disorders. In your first two years of this course, you’ll study a variety of topics, ensuring you have a solid foundation upon which to build the rest of your degree. At the end of your first year, you’ll complete your first NHS clinical placement. In your third year, you’ll complete another two placements, each lasting up to 12 weeks. In your fourth year, you’ll have the choice to specialise further in an area of personal interest and you’ll also complete a research project, bringing together all the practical, analytical, and presentation skills you’ve developed.

Finally, the campus is lovely. Surrey is known to emphasize the social life of students and always care about how you spend your free time at university. The student union offers more than 140 societies based on any hobbies and interests students have and clubs for all kinds of sport that a student might want to take up. And even with covid restrictions, the union managed to organize one of the biggest covid-safe university events in the country!

If you have any questions about Surrey or uni life in general, please ask as I can help you out!

Joao
Economics
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caseybones
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#14
Report 10 months ago
#14
(Original post by Ldn17)
You’re welcome! Feel free to message me if you have any questions. Dietetics is very competitive , I can assure you the degree at London met is professional and what better learning then getting hands on experience at London hospitals for placement good luck!
Sent you a message by the way! Realised posted this anonymously for some reason
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LDY
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#15
Report 9 months ago
#15
(Original post by University of Surrey Student Rep)
Hi there,

To introduce myself – I’m Joao, starting next semester I will be in my final year studying BSc Economics at Surrey University while working as a Campus Ambassador for JP Morgan. I recently finished my one-year industrial placement as an Economist for the British Government’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). I also had the opportunity to work as a Private Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Biosecurity.

If you are accepted in our Nutrition and Dietetics BSc (Hons), you will study on one of our longest-running courses, ranked 2nd in the UK by The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021 and 4th in the UK by the Complete University Guide 2022. This will give you access to our £10 million Innovation for Health Learning Laboratory and use equipment found in NHS research facilities and will allow you to complete three integrated clinical placements in the NHS to acquire a wealth of practical experience, under the supervision of qualified dietitians. You will also get the academic requirements needed to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to work as a dietitian once you’ve graduated.

In this course, you’ll learn to help prevent and treat disease as a registered dietitian, responding to the diverse needs of patients, families and carers, within a variety of settings. You’ll understand how food intake and dietary requirements can be altered by illness and you’ll be able to translate nutritional science and information about food, into practical dietary advice. This advice can be aimed at the general public to promote health or in a clinical environment to treat a wide range of medical disorders. In your first two years of this course, you’ll study a variety of topics, ensuring you have a solid foundation upon which to build the rest of your degree. At the end of your first year, you’ll complete your first NHS clinical placement. In your third year, you’ll complete another two placements, each lasting up to 12 weeks. In your fourth year, you’ll have the choice to specialise further in an area of personal interest and you’ll also complete a research project, bringing together all the practical, analytical, and presentation skills you’ve developed.

Finally, the campus is lovely. Surrey is known to emphasize the social life of students and always care about how you spend your free time at university. The student union offers more than 140 societies based on any hobbies and interests students have and clubs for all kinds of sport that a student might want to take up. And even with covid restrictions, the union managed to organize one of the biggest covid-safe university events in the country!

If you have any questions about Surrey or uni life in general, please ask as I can help you out!

Joao
Economics
I'm hoping to do this course, having previously wanting to do the King's course. Surrey is the best (2nd best?) option!
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LDY
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#16
Report 9 months ago
#16
(Original post by Anonymous)
Actually a 3 year versus a 5 year;

Going to kings: biomed for 3 years (undergrad) and then a masters in dietetics for 2 years; there aren’t any postgraduate degrees that last 1 year to become a dietitian.
So by doing that; 2 years with the grant, 3 without

I know most courses don’t offer the grant but when it’s comparing 5 years (2 with grant) versus simply 3 years that are all funded to achieve the same outcome (RD) then it does make a difference for sure.

I still feel silly that I will likely reject kings, applied as a joke at the beginning of the access course, but it makes no logical sense to do 3 years just for the name sake

Thank you so much for the comment; will definitely try and contact someone now.

Just one question, does the place of study have an impact on the interviews’ decision in hiring a RD?
I wanted to do the King's course, and already have a degree. So I can't get funding for a second degree if it doesn't include Dietetics. Going to go to Surrey as it will be funded and much better than London Met (ranking wise).
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Anonymous #1
#17
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#17
(Original post by LDY)
I wanted to do the King's course, and already have a degree. So I can't get funding for a second degree if it doesn't include Dietetics. Going to go to Surrey as it will be funded and much better than London Met (ranking wise).
What do you mean?
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manuraheel
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#18
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#18
Hi Anonymous
Im wondering what did you go for finally?
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turbobaithead
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#19
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#19
This is one of those few cases where the overall institution really does top everything else regardless of the course. There is no conceivable reality where I can recommend London Met over King's College. I know UCL grads may beg to differ but this is a surreal post.
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ajj2000
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#20
Report 3 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by turbobaithead)
This is one of those few cases where the overall institution really does top everything else regardless of the course. There is no conceivable reality where I can recommend London Met over King's College. I know UCL grads may beg to differ but this is a surreal post.
Did you read the thread?
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