Should I do a pure philosophy degree?

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Down_worlder
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#1
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#1
If anyone has thoughts, it would be great to hear them; I just want to ensure I'm fully informed. I know philosophy has no practical application and it leaves my future career prospects murky at best, but it seems to be the only thing I'm truly interested in and I feel it will better me as a person.

Do you know anyone who has chosen philosophy, and if so, are they dying in poverty on the streets?

Does choosing it seem like a plausible, sensible decision?

I'm also considering a joint honors degree in psychology and philosophy, but my concern is that it will not cover everything I'm interested in, whereas a pure philosophy degree seems varied and interesting. What would you do in my place?

Thanks.
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Becky2305
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Down_worlder)
If anyone has thoughts, it would be great to hear them; I just want to ensure I'm fully informed. I know philosophy has no practical application and it leaves my future career prospects murky at best, but it seems to be the only thing I'm truly interested in and I feel it will better me as a person.

Do you know anyone who has chosen philosophy, and if so, are they dying in poverty on the streets?

Does choosing it seem like a plausible, sensible decision?

I'm also considering a joint honors degree in psychology and philosophy, but my concern is that it will not cover everything I'm interested in, whereas a pure philosophy degree seems varied and interesting. What would you do in my place?

Thanks.
A previous colleague of mine did both a pure philosophy undergrad and masters and he works as a team leader in a bar, so not dying of poverty but also only on just above minimum wage. I think this is out of choice though, not from lack of trying for other careers.
I have a joint literature and philosophy masters and I work in marketing.

In your position, I would personally choose to do the joint honours course as it opens more doors for you. It all depends what you want to do career wise though!
Last edited by Becky2305; 9 months ago
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ageshallnot
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#3
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#3
The only person I know who did Philosophy now works in insurance and is climbing the ladder rapidly at a reputable company.
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gjd800
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#4
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#4
It does not leave your options 'murky'; stats every year show how employable proactive phil grads are. It is only as 'murky' as any other non-vocational degree

Where does this notion come from? It is nonsense, honestly.

Joint hons courses are not guaranteed to open any more doors than a single hons simply in virtue of there being two subjects - again, I don't know where this notion comes from

What will make the biggest difference is internships, volunteering opportunities and stuff like this. Do not neglect that during a phil degree, and you will be fine

I have 3x philosophy degrees and have taught it for the past 7 years. I see students go into every role imaginable every year, because most jobs are not bothered about what your degree is

If you fancy a phil degree, do it.
Last edited by gjd800; 9 months ago
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Socratic
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#5
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(Original post by Down_worlder)
I know philosophy has no practical application and it leaves my future career prospects murky at best
Philosophy develops problem-solving and analytical skills better than any other subject.

Graduate jobs rarely require subject-specific knowledge, hence the majority of them don't ask for a particular degree. I worked at the Big Four after single-honours philosophy; I actually quoted Nietzsche in an application and the first-round interviewer loved it. At the assessment centres I met people from every background -- there was even someone with a PhD in biology.

Having said that, I'm in favour of joint-honours, only because UK higher education is prematurely specialised. The US system is better where you choose a wide variety of modules in the first year, then a major and minor over the next three.
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Down_worlder
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#6
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(Original post by Socratic)
Philosophy develops problem-solving and analytical skills better than any other subject.

Graduate jobs rarely require subject-specific knowledge, hence the majority of them don't ask for a particular degree. I worked at the Big Four after single-honours philosophy; I actually quoted Nietzsche in an application and the first-round interviewer loved it. At the assessment centres I met people from every background -- there was even someone with a PhD in biology.

Having said that, I'm in favour of joint-honours, only because UK higher education is prematurely specialised. The US system is better where you choose a wide variety of modules in the first year, then a major and minor over the next three.
Hahaha that sounds really cool. If I studied philosophy I'd probably go around quoting Nietzsche at everyone all the time.

And I wholly agree - sixteen is WAY to early to have to make all your big life decisions, the American system would be much more facilitating towards my indecision.
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ajj2000
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#7
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#7
What else are you considering? I seriously doubt psychology and philosophy has been career outcomes than single option philosophy.
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MatthewAteYou
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#8
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#8
I can only echo what’s been said above, many philosophy grads have good career outcomes.

One thing I found from doing a joint honours with philosophy was that I couldn’t study it as much as I wanted to, so if your heart is in philosophy do it!
Last edited by MatthewAteYou; 8 months ago
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twinklelittlstar
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#9
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#9
Hey. Philosophy student here. I was also debating whether or not studying this was worth it considering its future job prospect, but I believe it is. There was this lady somewhere (lmao this sounds terrible but hmo) that said that if u really enjoy your subject, u will thrive in it, and open a career path for yourself because you are passionate about it and won’t mind putting in the hours of work. If it’s what you love, I’d go for it. The joint degree seems to cut down information for each subject a lot, leaves stuff out, and from what people say up the thread, choosing joint over single doesn’t really make a difference. Good luck!
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