CharlotteGraham>
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I’m currently looking at doing a biomedical science course, although there’s only a handful of universities in the UK that are accredited by the IBMS.

I was just wondering if anyone new which unis out of these would be the best choice to go for, in terms of quality of teaching, resources, support etc?
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UCLan Ambassador
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(Original post by CharlotteGraham>)
I’m currently looking at doing a biomedical science course, although there’s only a handful of universities in the UK that are accredited by the IBMS.

I was just wondering if anyone new which unis out of these would be the best choice to go for, in terms of quality of teaching, resources, support etc?
Hi Charlotte,

I studied at UCLan in a different subject area and can say that it's a great campus that is diverse and welcomin, based close to Preston city centre and with great transport links. The campus and facilities are constantly evolving and the lecturers are supportive and experienced. Our Biomedical Sciences BSc (Hons) has been accredited by the IBMS for twenty year and places are currently available in clearing. https://bit.ly/37ZfIF4

I hope this is useful
Best regards

Andy
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UniversityOfSunderland
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(Original post by CharlotteGraham>)
I’m currently looking at doing a biomedical science course, although there’s only a handful of universities in the UK that are accredited by the IBMS.

I was just wondering if anyone new which unis out of these would be the best choice to go for, in terms of quality of teaching, resources, support etc?
Shameless Sunderland plug here

Our unique course allows you to work towards one of four possible degree titles and is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), the professional body for those who work within the field of biomedical science


Our Biosciences courses are ranked 12th in the UK (The Guardian University league tables, 2021) and the course has 100% Overall Satisfaction according to the National Student Survey 2021


BSc (Hons) Applied Biomedical Science and BSc (Hons) Healthcare Science (Life Sciences) courses are both approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and lead to eligibility to join the HCPC register as a Biomedical Scientist, in terms of the course itself, we have a very
'hands on' approach to learning in our new state-of-the-art interactive learning facility 'The Living Lab' and modern bioscience laboratories
We also have a unique relationship with our Patient, Carer and Public Involvement Group who take part in a variety of activities to support learning
Opportunities to collaborate in an interprofessional learning capacity with other healthcare courses which could include pharmacy and medicine.


You can check out our student case studies here for an insight into the course as well as chat with current students here about their experiences too.

We also have places available in clearing should you wish to join us this year. You can apply online or call our team now on 0191 515 3000 for advice.

Hope this helps
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StarLinyx
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(Original post by CharlotteGraham>)
I’m currently looking at doing a biomedical science course, although there’s only a handful of universities in the UK that are accredited by the IBMS.

I was just wondering if anyone new which unis out of these would be the best choice to go for, in terms of quality of teaching, resources, support etc?
Why do you want to study Biomedical Sciences? The degree is oversubscribed with students who want to apply to graduate entry medicine (even though the Biomed degree subject itself isn't that highly regarded within academia compared to subjects like Pharmacology and Biology), the Biomedical profession itself will have few vacancies each year as lab automation takes over, and there is an oversupply of graduates in this area as a whole anyway.
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mxx454
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I think the best university that’s accredited by IBMS is probably lancaster, most biomed courses aren’t accredited though.
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Uni of Hull Students
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(Original post by CharlotteGraham>)
I’m currently looking at doing a biomedical science course, although there’s only a handful of universities in the UK that are accredited by the IBMS.

I was just wondering if anyone new which unis out of these would be the best choice to go for, in terms of quality of teaching, resources, support etc?
Hi CharlotteGraham>

Here at the University of Hull we offer BSc Biomedical Science which is accredited by IBMS.
We are currently accepting applications through clearing for this course.

We designed our Biomedical Science degree with input from the Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.
You'll gather the knowledge and skills for employment in a variety of settings – including potentially life-saving work at the cutting edge of health research.
This course is accredited by The Institute of Biomedical Science - so you can be confident that it's been approved by expert academics and professionals as meeting industry standards.

Six reasons to study Biomedical Science at Hull:
Drive innovation that saves lives
Top 10 in the UK for assessment and feedback and organisation and management in Biomedical Sciences (2021)
Accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science
95% graduate employability rating
Benefit from access to our PET Research Centre
Excellent links with local industry and hospitals


If you have any questions abut what it is like to be a student on our Biomedical Science course, you can visit our Ask a Student Page and chat with one of our current students - https://www.hull.ac.uk/study/ask-a-student

Please do not hesitate to get in contact with us

Emily
University of Hull Student Representative
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jkng
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(Original post by StarLinyx)
Why do you want to study Biomedical Sciences? The degree is oversubscribed with students who want to apply to graduate entry medicine (even though the Biomed degree subject itself isn't that highly regarded within academia compared to subjects like Pharmacology and Biology), the Biomedical profession itself will have few vacancies each year as lab automation takes over, and there is an oversupply of graduates in this area as a whole anyway.
Well, thats why most well known unis are not accredited by IBMS. They are accredited my RSB, which is more of a research based(Some unis are both RSB and IBMS accredited). For real, Biomedical science is really not a good degree for students who aren't planning to go for master or phd. Biomed is very broad, so you have more choice for your master, it can be a very useful tool if you use it wisely. Depending on the situation and analyzing the potential industrial growth, then only pick the field for ur phd or master. If you are planning to get a bachelor only, I dont recommend it as well, unless you are very passionate.

However, this is just my opinion. I myself is also going to study biomed in september. I'm planning to work for a while then study master or phd, depending on the situation. But I'm not going to stop at bachelor. Maybe because I'm going to study that course, thats why im having such good thoughts about it. But it is true that you shouldn't only study undergraduate biomed and I heard that there were better routes to become biomedical scientist than studying the biomed course.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by StarLinyx)
Why do you want to study Biomedical Sciences? The degree is oversubscribed with students who want to apply to graduate entry medicine (even though the Biomed degree subject itself isn't that highly regarded within academia compared to subjects like Pharmacology and Biology), the Biomedical profession itself will have few vacancies each year as lab automation takes over, and there is an oversupply of graduates in this area as a whole anyway.
The latter is untrue.

Automation is not affecting the amount of Biomedical Scientist's. It will eventually, one day, begin, reducing the amount of MLA's, which is a non-graduate role, whilst also increasing the amount of Associate Practitioner's. The field, like many in the NHS, is actually struggling to recruit. There's many unfilled roles due to a plethora of unqualified graduates.
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
The latter is untrue.

Automation is not affecting the amount of Biomedical Scientist's. It will eventually, one day, begin, reducing the amount of MLA's, which is a non-graduate role, whilst also increasing the amount of Associate Practitioner's. The field, like many in the NHS, is actually struggling to recruit. There's many unfilled roles due to a plethora of unqualified graduates.
Not that many entry level BMS roles for graduates last time I looked on the NHS jobs website - currently just 32 band 5 vacancies. The graduate prospects website says:-

Competition for trainee positions is fierce as there are limited opportunities, so check job adverts regularly and contact hospitals directly.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by StarLinyx)
Not that many entry level BMS roles for graduates last time I looked on the NHS jobs website - currently just 32 band 5 vacancies. The graduate prospects website says:-

Competition for trainee positions is fierce as there are limited opportunities, so check job adverts regularly and contact hospitals directly.
Something that bares no relevance to your original point. If you can provide data on the volume of BMS job posts over a substantial time period decreasing, fair enough, but your claim would also result in a reduction of Band 6 posts. I can tell you, as a Specialist Biomedical Scientist myself, we are struggling to recruit qualified staff.

This is because of the fact many students are graduating from Biomedical Science courses thinking that this leaves them suitable qualified to be a Biomedical Scientist. It's a fair assumption, and one that is often amplified by the Universities themselves, not because they claim it is sufficient, they would get into a lot of trouble if they did that, but in my opinion they don't do enough to make it clear that it isn't sufficient.

Our most recent BMS advert went out accepting 5's and 6's. There were 3 posts, we only managed to fill 2, one being a Band 6, so is not a recent graduate. On the other hand, we have many applying for Band 2 roles who have degrees, hoping that they will find their way into a Trainee post, because they've realised upon graduating that not only are they not qualified for a BMS role, they're not even qualified upon graduation for a Trainee BMS role, since they lack NHS experience.

Additionally, the reason Trainee roles are so competitive is probably 80% down to the fact we have a bottleneck of graduates who are now realising they need a Trainee BMS role to get into the career they want to do, whereas when some of my older colleagues graduate, there were different routes in place which meant they could get into a BMS role pretty much after graduation. 20% of it is down to the fact that we're understaffed. You might think, well heck, hire some Trainee's if you can't find qualified staff. The issue is we don't have enough qualified staff to train the trainee's, whilst maintaining our routine service. It's catch 22.

I'll also add, the kind of automation that people claim will reduce the amount of BMS's, such as Kiestra or WASP, is only in very few laboratories, 2 that I have had direct experience with and neither felt the ability to reduce BMS staff. This is because the kind of results we're dealing with require interpretation, these can't interpret for us. Of course, this post is Microbiology-centric. If you want to discuss Blood Sciences, I've actually worked in a Biochemistry department also, and automation has been at a high level in them departments for 10+ years and they've not seen a reduction if BMS staff.
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CharlotteGraham>
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Something that bares no relevance to your original point. If you can provide data on the volume of BMS job posts over a substantial time period decreasing, fair enough, but your claim would also result in a reduction of Band 6 posts. I can tell you, as a Specialist Biomedical Scientist myself, we are struggling to recruit qualified staff.

This is because of the fact many students are graduating from Biomedical Science courses thinking that this leaves them suitable qualified to be a Biomedical Scientist. It's a fair assumption, and one that is often amplified by the Universities themselves, not because they claim it is sufficient, they would get into a lot of trouble if they did that, but in my opinion they don't do enough to make it clear that it isn't sufficient.

Our most recent BMS advert went out accepting 5's and 6's. There were 3 posts, we only managed to fill 2, one being a Band 6, so is not a recent graduate. On the other hand, we have many applying for Band 2 roles who have degrees, hoping that they will find their way into a Trainee post, because they've realised upon graduating that not only are they not qualified for a BMS role, they're not even qualified upon graduation for a Trainee BMS role, since they lack NHS experience.

Additionally, the reason Trainee roles are so competitive is probably 80% down to the fact we have a bottleneck of graduates who are now realising they need a Trainee BMS role to get into the career they want to do, whereas when some of my older colleagues graduate, there were different routes in place which meant they could get into a BMS role pretty much after graduation. 20% of it is down to the fact that we're understaffed. You might think, well heck, hire some Trainee's if you can't find qualified staff. The issue is we don't have enough qualified staff to train the trainee's, whilst maintaining our routine service. It's catch 22.

I'll also add, the kind of automation that people claim will reduce the amount of BMS's, such as Kiestra or WASP, is only in very few laboratories, 2 that I have had direct experience with and neither felt the ability to reduce BMS staff. This is because the kind of results we're dealing with require interpretation, these can't interpret for us. Of course, this post is Microbiology-centric. If you want to discuss Blood Sciences, I've actually worked in a Biochemistry department also, and automation has been at a high level in them departments for 10+ years and they've not seen a reduction if BMS staff.
Would you then recommend doing a course that has a professional placement year? Would that make me qualified, or how exactly does one become qualified? I want to become either a microbiologist, clinical scientist in microbiology or either use it to then go onto medicine however that just depends on how I’m feeling at the end of my course. My father works as a biochemist and was able to give me some advice but he was unclear about certain things so I’m not 100% sure on what the correct steps to take are.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by CharlotteGraham>)
Would you then recommend doing a course that has a professional placement year? Would that make me qualified, or how exactly does one become qualified? I want to become either a microbiologist, clinical scientist in microbiology or either use it to then go onto medicine however that just depends on how I’m feeling at the end of my course. My father works as a biochemist and was able to give me some advice but he was unclear about certain things so I’m not 100% sure on what the correct steps to take are.
There's a few vague terms in there. You want to be a Microbiologist? That term could be used to describe anybody within the Microbiology department including the Consultant in Microbiology and the Biomedical Scientists. Clinical Scientist's in Microbiology are pretty rare, usually 1-2 in each major region (i.e Yorkshire, North West etc.) They tend to do more R&D than anything, there's not really a place for them in how Microbiology departments work.

If you want to be a Biomedical Scientist in Microbiology, then the best route is with an integrated placement, BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science).
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Cloudiii
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Something that bares no relevance to your original point. If you can provide data on the volume of BMS job posts over a substantial time period decreasing, fair enough, but your claim would also result in a reduction of Band 6 posts. I can tell you, as a Specialist Biomedical Scientist myself, we are struggling to recruit qualified staff.

This is because of the fact many students are graduating from Biomedical Science courses thinking that this leaves them suitable qualified to be a Biomedical Scientist. It's a fair assumption, and one that is often amplified by the Universities themselves, not because they claim it is sufficient, they would get into a lot of trouble if they did that, but in my opinion they don't do enough to make it clear that it isn't sufficient.

Our most recent BMS advert went out accepting 5's and 6's. There were 3 posts, we only managed to fill 2, one being a Band 6, so is not a recent graduate. On the other hand, we have many applying for Band 2 roles who have degrees, hoping that they will find their way into a Trainee post, because they've realised upon graduating that not only are they not qualified for a BMS role, they're not even qualified upon graduation for a Trainee BMS role, since they lack NHS experience.

Additionally, the reason Trainee roles are so competitive is probably 80% down to the fact we have a bottleneck of graduates who are now realising they need a Trainee BMS role to get into the career they want to do, whereas when some of my older colleagues graduate, there were different routes in place which meant they could get into a BMS role pretty much after graduation. 20% of it is down to the fact that we're understaffed. You might think, well heck, hire some Trainee's if you can't find qualified staff. The issue is we don't have enough qualified staff to train the trainee's, whilst maintaining our routine service. It's catch 22.

I'll also add, the kind of automation that people claim will reduce the amount of BMS's, such as Kiestra or WASP, is only in very few laboratories, 2 that I have had direct experience with and neither felt the ability to reduce BMS staff. This is because the kind of results we're dealing with require interpretation, these can't interpret for us. Of course, this post is Microbiology-centric. If you want to discuss Blood Sciences, I've actually worked in a Biochemistry department also, and automation has been at a high level in them departments for 10+ years and they've not seen a reduction if BMS staff.
Hello! I am going to study biomedical science this year because I am not too sure which career path to go into exactly but this is around the area I think I want to be in. So how would you become a fully qualified BMS? I am going to do a placement year and my course is accredited with the IBMS, so is that enough? Also I may end up wanting to do a masters degree if I decide I want to go into medical research for cancer and diseases and stuff, so do you think I have made the right choice of going to study biomedical science? I looked around and seen some unis that accept you on masters degrees with BMS. I wanted to keep some career paths open to me and I'm really interested in the course which is why I've chosen it. I just want to make sure I made the right choice and with people such as the above making all these statements, I just want some input from someone who actually knows what they are talking about. Thank you!
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jkng
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(Original post by Cloudiii)
Hello! I am going to study biomedical science this year because I am not too sure which career path to go into exactly but this is around the area I think I want to be in. So how would you become a fully qualified BMS? I am going to do a placement year and my course is accredited with the IBMS, so is that enough? Also I may end up wanting to do a masters degree if I decide I want to go into medical research for cancer and diseases and stuff, so do you think I have made the right choice of going to study biomedical science? I looked around and seen some unis that accept you on masters degrees with BMS. I wanted to keep some career paths open to me and I'm really interested in the course which is why I've chosen it. I just want to make sure I made the right choice and with people such as the above making all these statements, I just want some input from someone who actually knows what they are talking about. Thank you!
my case is somewhat similar to urs, I myself also do not know what I want to specialize in. I'll be studying bachelor of biomed this sept but not IBMS accredited, i think it was RSB. I'm also planning to continue unitl maybe master or phd. So I think ur decision is okayyy as long as u dont stop at bachelor. Our course is really broad so we can have more choice for our master, and we should take this undergrad biomed as a stepping stone for our master. I think for our master or phd, we can observe the future potential industry growth and pick a master course that helps in our career.
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(Original post by Cloudiii)
Hello! I am going to study biomedical science this year because I am not too sure which career path to go into exactly but this is around the area I think I want to be in. So how would you become a fully qualified BMS? I am going to do a placement year and my course is accredited with the IBMS, so is that enough? Also I may end up wanting to do a masters degree if I decide I want to go into medical research for cancer and diseases and stuff, so do you think I have made the right choice of going to study biomedical science? I looked around and seen some unis that accept you on masters degrees with BMS. I wanted to keep some career paths open to me and I'm really interested in the course which is why I've chosen it. I just want to make sure I made the right choice and with people such as the above making all these statements, I just want some input from someone who actually knows what they are talking about. Thank you!
Ignore the reply after yours about postgraduate study, it's not required to become a qualified BMS and people shouldn't really be giving advice based on what they suspect.

If you get a placement within the NHS, then they will allow you to do your registration portfolio. However, these are usually very competitive. IBMS accreditation is just a criteria within the IBMS Registration Portfolio, you have to complete that to then become registered with the HCPC as a Biomedical Scientist. What University is your degree at?
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leviticus.
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I mean you could do biomedical science at Oxford or Imperial and have pretty much all doors open to you, especially consulting
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(Original post by leviticus.)
I mean you could do biomedical science at Oxford or Imperial and have pretty much all doors open to you, especially consulting
All options except the one the poster is enquiring about. Thanks for your input.
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
All options except the one the poster is enquiring about. Thanks for your input.
what?
EDIT: its oxford brookes that is IBMS accredited, my b
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Cloudiii
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Ignore the reply after yours about postgraduate study, it's not required to become a qualified BMS and people shouldn't really be giving advice based on what they suspect.

If you get a placement within the NHS, then they will allow you to do your registration portfolio. However, these are usually very competitive. IBMS accreditation is just a criteria within the IBMS Registration Portfolio, you have to complete that to then become registered with the HCPC as a Biomedical Scientist. What University is your degree at?
It's at university of Essex
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(Original post by Cloudiii)
It's at university of Essex
Ideally you'd have been at a University that offers the NHS Practitioner's Training program, then you would have been able to graduate after 3 years with HCPC registration, but you're not, so your best option now is to hope you get a placement in the NHS. As I've mentioned, they're very competitive.

If you don't, which statistically is likely, you'll then need to gain a Trainee BMS role in the NHS. The caveat to this is that in the job spec it asks for NHS laboratory experience, so actually you're going to have to get a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant role first. You literally need a second of experience so that you can tick the box. I've worked with people who have been an MLA for 2-3 months and then left for a Trainee BMS role.
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