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A level history coursework

For my A level history coursework the generic basis of the causes of the First World War - we must use a variety of resources but have a main title and I am currently stuck as to which area I should focus on?
If anyone has any ideas I would be thrilled to know!
Thank you :smile:
Original post by amyjane181
For my A level history coursework the generic basis of the causes of the First World War - we must use a variety of resources but have a main title and I am currently stuck as to which area I should focus on?
If anyone has any ideas I would be thrilled to know!
Thank you :smile:

How about

To what extent X was responsible for the outbreak of WWI?

where X is...

A country.
A "system" eg alliances, militarism, imperialism, capitalism etc.
A "failure" of something eg diplomacy, military planning.
Original post by amyjane181
For my A level history coursework the generic basis of the causes of the First World War - we must use a variety of resources but have a main title and I am currently stuck as to which area I should focus on?
If anyone has any ideas I would be thrilled to know!
Thank you :smile:

Have you decided on a question by now?
Reply 3
I wanted to create the idea of it way before I began to write it; after the lessons that followed and some analysis of resources I decided on“The greatest single cause of the war was the secret system of alliances which developed.” How far do you agree with the Sydney Bradshaw interpretation that the alliance system was the main cause for the outbreak of the war in 1914?
Original post by amyjane181
I wanted to create the idea of it way before I began to write it; after the lessons that followed and some analysis of resources I decided on“The greatest single cause of the war was the secret system of alliances which developed.” How far do you agree with the Sydney Bradshaw interpretation that the alliance system was the main cause for the outbreak of the war in 1914?

While specific details were kept secret I believe that the main terms of the key alliances were pretty well known by every country. Germany knew that Russia and France had an alliance and that attacking the latter would bring in the former. Similarly, the Entente powers knew that Germany and Austro-Hungary were bound together. The statesmen of the time certainly weren't in the complete dark about the consequences of their decisions. Therefore I wouldn't include the word "secret" in my question unless it's only there to be knocked down.

I've got Sydney B Fay's book on my shelves (Bradshaw was his middle name) though it's a long time since I read it. I've just flicked through his conclusion and it's interesting that in his penultimate paragraph he talks about the alliances yet even then says that they wouldn't have led to war without the assassination of FF.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 5
Original post by ageshallnot
While specific details were kept secret I believe that the main terms of the key alliances were pretty well known by every country. Germany knew that Russia and France had an alliance and that attacking the latter would bring in the former. Similarly, the Entente powers knew that Germany and Austro-Hungary were bound together. The statesmen of the time certainly weren't in the complete dark about the consequences of their decisions. Therefore I wouldn't include the word "secret" in my question unless it's only there to be knocked down.

I've got Sydney B Fay's book on my shelves (Bradshaw was his middle name) though it's a long time since I read it. I've just flicked through his conclusion and it's interesting that in his penultimate paragraph he talks about the alliances yet even then says that they wouldn't have led to war without the assassination of FF.


I completely agree in the sense that each statesmen knew the severity of developing an alliance - essentially the question is there to be argued for and against; as you rightly said there are multiple causations to the War, so it is easy to argue against.
The quotation itself is from the book, hence the wording. The assassination was the straw that that broke the camels back; whereas, the triple alliance was created in 1882 and was a contributing factor to the crisis of masculinity that penultimately caused the war.
As mentioned there are multiple reasonings for the war; all of which will be accounted for.
I do not own the book, the quotation was mentioned by my teacher when discussing the role of the alliances. Therefore, I would be grateful to develop a better understanding of the book - therefore if possible could respond you with some quotations that argue the assassination and alliances, the page number and the full title of the book so i can reference it properly.
Thank you for all your help!!
Reply 6
Hello, I am thinking about doing this question for my coursework next year, please can you send me your answer for your coursework on this topic just so I can get a base? Thank you so much
Original post by 17kingw
Hello, I am thinking about doing this question for my coursework next year, please can you send me your answer for your coursework on this topic just so I can get a base? Thank you so much

That would come perilously close to plagiarism.

In any case, the OP hasn't been on TSR for more than a year.
(edited 8 months ago)

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