Vaccine

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
I have had covid in 2020 and I wasn’t that ill I just felt like I had a cold and I lost my taste but I felt okay for majority of it .

Personally I don’t think there is any point in getting the vaccine just as a personal choice as I was okay the first time so why would I be really ill if I got it again but if I choose not too will this affect me a lot and will people be against me if I don’t have it . Should I just get it anyway even if I don’t want it ?
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Anonymous #2
#2
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#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I have had covid in 2020 and I wasn’t that ill I just felt like I had a cold and I lost my taste but I felt okay for majority of it .

Personally I don’t think there is any point in getting the vaccine just as a personal choice as I was okay the first time so why would I be really ill if I got it again but if I choose not too will this affect me a lot and will people be against me if I don’t have it . Should I just get it anyway even if I don’t want it ?
There's more to the covid vaccine than protecting yourself. By taking the vaccine you will be pushing towards herd immunity and protecting the general public as well as yourself
And yes. Some of your friends might disagree with your choice. It's generally a good idea to get the vaccine if you've been offered it, even if you don't want it. If you had a genuine excuse like your parents were forcing you against getting the vaccine then it would be a different problem but you have a choice and your reasoning isn't good enough quite honestly
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RogerOxon
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
I have had covid in 2020 and I wasn’t that ill I just felt like I had a cold and I lost my taste but I felt okay for majority of it .

Personally I don’t think there is any point in getting the vaccine just as a personal choice as I was okay the first time so why would I be really ill if I got it again but if I choose not too will this affect me a lot and will people be against me if I don’t have it . Should I just get it anyway even if I don’t want it ?
You can catch it again, with different symptoms, and more severe effects. Get vaccinated - it dramatically reduces your chances of being severely ill / dying / long COVID. In addition, it makes you less likely to pass it on to others, who may die from it.

You want the vaccination. You don't want to be severely ill / die / have long COVID / pass it on to others. It's the only realistic way to beat COVID. The more people that refuse to be vaccinated, the more risk there is of nasty strains, and the longer COVID will be a threat.
Last edited by RogerOxon; 8 months ago
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black tea
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#4
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#4
(Original post by RogerOxon)
You can catch it again, with different symptoms, and more severe effects. Get vaccinated - it dramatically reduces your chances of being severely ill / dying / long COVID. In addition, it makes you less likely to pass it on to others, who may die from it.

You want the vaccination. You don't want to be severely ill / die / have long COVID / pass it on to others. It's the only realistic way to beat COVID. The more people that refuse to be vaccinated, the more risk there is of nasty strains, and the longer COVID will be a threat.
You can catch it again even if you've had the vaccine though.

I probably wouldn't have bothered getting the vaccine if I'd already had covid, but I believe the official advice is to still get vaccinated and it's probably more sensible to follow the official NHS advice than listen to the opinions of random people on the internet.
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username5310160
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
I have had covid in 2020 and I wasn’t that ill I just felt like I had a cold and I lost my taste but I felt okay for majority of it .

Personally I don’t think there is any point in getting the vaccine just as a personal choice as I was okay the first time so why would I be really ill if I got it again but if I choose not too will this affect me a lot and will people be against me if I don’t have it . Should I just get it anyway even if I don’t want it ?
i mean... its ur choice. its not compulsory. the reason i'm not having it is because its impossible to see long term effects yet, once its reached like 2 years, i'm most likely having it, the only reason i'm not having it is because of the long term effects. i know the nhs is most likely reliable but just in case, its impossible for them to measure long term effects when the vaccine came out so fast.
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SyedN
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#6
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#6
(Original post by migos)
i mean... its ur choice. its not compulsory. the reason i'm not having it is because its impossible to see long term effects yet, once its reached like 2 years, i'm most likely having it, the only reason i'm not having it is because of the long term effects. i know the nhs is most likely reliable but just in case, its impossible for them to measure long term effects when the vaccine came out so fast.
Let me start by saying that this is not directed at migos nor is it an attack on your post, I have recently seen a lot of misinformation about the vaccine so I thought I'd post a bit regarding that to combat it.

The vaccine came out super because research into the coronavirus family didn't start in 2019 or 2020, as most people think, but was actually the main focus way back in 2002 when SARS epidemic occurred.

Research into the coronavirus family actually started well over 50 years ago so we already knew the genome, structure of the viruses (excluding Covid-19 because it didn't exist yet) and the life cycle of the virus. This meant that, while we hadn't studied Covid-19 in much detail before it came, we already knew the basics of it's family which of course helped speed up the process of creating a vaccine.

Another reason why it came out super quick was because of advancements made in the field of medical technology such as genome sequencing which meant within 10 days of the first case of Covid-19 we had already discovered its viral sequence. Once it became a pandemic and with a massive global effort, clinical trails could be done much quicker as well compared to 1 company having to test out a drug or vaccine which would of course take them much longer compared to if the entire world was willing to help.

Even mRNA technology isn't something that is completely new that came out last year, but rather something that has been worked on for some time already. It also isn't anywhere near as dangerous as a small minority of people make it out to be, because it cannot alter DNA or anything like that due to DNA never leaving the nucleus and mRNA cannot enter the nucleus, mRNA can only leave the nucleus (the vaccine mRNA cannot leave the nucleus because it was never there in the first place and hence cannot alter our DNA at all).

Clinical trials also finished quickly, not because they were rushed, but because there was high interest in volunteers for the trials which meant that 1000s if not 10s of thousands of people were volunteering to have the vaccine tried and tested on them before it reached the general public. It also helped that creating this vaccine was a global effort and thus there were lots of testing sites as well which enables us to gather a large amount of data all at once.

Organisations such as CDC are still monitoring the safety of the vaccine to see if they can pick up any side effects which were not detected in the trails and so far have not detected any serious long term effects (other than the blood clots from the Oxford vaccine which is not a mRNA vaccine and even then, the chances of developing blood clots is super low as you are more likely to catch Covid-19 and die from it then get blood clots from the Oxford vaccine and you are more likely to get Covid-19 and develop blood clots then you are from the Oxford vaccine itself.)

With regards to OP's questions, I would still recommend taking the vaccine even if you have had Covid-19 already, because at the time of this post there is no evidence of natural immunity being better than the vaccine acquired immunity, The vaccines will provide extra protective immunity to those who have already been infected and will provide protective immunity to those who have not yet had Covid-19 without risking exposure to it.
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RogerOxon
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#7
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#7
(Original post by black tea)
You can catch it again even if you've had the vaccine though.

I probably wouldn't have bothered getting the vaccine if I'd already had covid, but I believe the official advice is to still get vaccinated and it's probably more sensible to follow the official NHS advice than listen to the opinions of random people on the internet.
It's all about probabilities. Having the vaccine gives you the best probability of survival.
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black tea
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#8
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#8
(Original post by RogerOxon)
It's all about probabilities. Having the vaccine gives you the best probability of survival.
Perhaps. We will need more time to see what the true statistics are though.

I know someone who is currently dying from Covid despite being double vaccinated - kind of makes it hard to feel optimistic and see the vaccine as a panacea.
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RogerOxon
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#9
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(Original post by black tea)
Perhaps. We will need more time to see what the true statistics are though.

I know someone who is currently dying from Covid despite being double vaccinated - kind of makes it hard to feel optimistic and see the vaccine as a panacea.
Statistics are based on more than one sample ..

Trials have been done, and the results are clear - get vaccinated.

Whilst some delude themselves by thinking that they need more samples, there are too many unvaccinated people dying
Last edited by RogerOxon; 8 months ago
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Scotney
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#10
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#10
(Original post by black tea)
Perhaps. We will need more time to see what the true statistics are though.

I know someone who is currently dying from Covid despite being double vaccinated - kind of makes it hard to feel optimistic and see the vaccine as a panacea.
We need mitigations as well as the vaccine.Masks should have remained a legal requirement indoors and ventilation needs to be taken a lotmore seriously.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Scotney)
We need mitigations as well as the vaccine.Masks should have remained a legal requirement indoors and ventilation needs to be taken a lotmore seriously.
I agree with this. I still wear a mask and stick to the previous rules, as my mum has Asthma
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black tea
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Scotney)
We need mitigations as well as the vaccine.Masks should have remained a legal requirement indoors and ventilation needs to be taken a lotmore seriously.
Agree.
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Anonymous #1
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#13
Do you think it would be likely for me to be seriously ill the second time of getting covid if I was fine the first
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Scotney
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Anonymous)
I agree with this. I still wear a mask and stick to the previous rules, as my mum has Asthma
So do we.
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Anonymous #2
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#15
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do you think it would be likely for me to be seriously ill the second time of getting covid if I was fine the first
It's hard to say but the vaccine reduces the chance of you getting hospitalised and having severe symptoms of COVID
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black tea
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do you think it would be likely for me to be seriously ill the second time of getting covid if I was fine the first
There have been case reports of people being more unwell with the second infection than with the first
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Scotney
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do you think it would be likely for me to be seriously ill the second time of getting covid if I was fine the first
Depends did you have it before April 2021 because if so you will not have much protection against the delta variant which effects young people more seriously.
Last edited by Scotney; 8 months ago
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Anonymous #1
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#18
(Original post by Scotney)
Depends did you have it before April 2021 because if so you will not have much protection against the delta variant.
I had it in October 2020
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black tea
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Scotney)
Depends did you have it before April 2021 because if so you will not have much protection against the delta variant which effects young people more seriously.
What is the evidence for this?
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Anonymous #2
#20
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#20
(Original post by Anonymous)
I agree with this. I still wear a mask and stick to the previous rules, as my mum has Asthma
My whole family does too. It's so disheartening to see people walking around in crowded areas without masks now and even on public transport
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