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Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

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LSE and sociology bsc

I recently got a place at LSE for Sociology.

I am worried about Sociology being the subject that everyone calls it unemployable (despite I would be studying at LSE). I wish to do social and public policy at the government (civil service) like public administration perhaps.

Do you guys think Sociology at LSE is worth it to go if i wish to pursue this career path? Or would you guys go for another university and study sociology there... (like Bristol or Baths idk)

Please share some thoughts on how good LSE Sociology could be for my future. I heard that this uni is competitive, but I dont think it is that competitive (offer rate and stuff) for Sociology course.

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Original post by Anonymous
I recently got a place at LSE for Sociology.

I am worried about Sociology being the subject that everyone calls it unemployable (despite I would be studying at LSE). I wish to do social and public policy at the government (civil service) like public administration perhaps.

Do you guys think Sociology at LSE is worth it to go if i wish to pursue this career path? Or would you guys go for another university and study sociology there... (like Bristol or Baths idk)

Please share some thoughts on how good LSE Sociology could be for my future. I heard that this uni is competitive, but I dont think it is that competitive (offer rate and stuff) for Sociology course.

Personally, I would have thought any degree from LSE is highly employable just because of the national and international reputation of the university. Also, given its reputation, I think that LSE attracts the top researchers and professors in the country so I don't think you should be worried. They will also offer a lot of networking events so do go to them if you're interested. Focus now on getting a first and getting some work experience, and also have fun in the process. A first from LSE is no joke.
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Reply 2
Original post by Courtesy
Personally, I would have thought any degree from LSE is highly employable just because of the national and international reputation of the university. Also, given its reputation, I think that LSE attracts the top researchers and professors in the country so I don't think you should be worried. They will also offer a lot of networking events so do go to them if you're interested. Focus now on getting a first and getting some work experience, and also have fun in the process. A first from LSE is no joke.


Thanks I was just worried about career options. A mean, at the LSE Sociology bsc 2022 emtry website, they show you top 5 sectors last year sociology graduates worked in, and one of them is a factory i think. It says they worked at "manufacture if leather and other products". Cuz I don't wanna work at a factory making things. I wanna do social policies and stuff ---- civil service
Reply 4

But that isn't at LSE or other respected unis is it. Obviously LSE Sociology (bsc) or Bath Sociooogy degree would be more employable than Sociology (bsc) at a least respected uni.

I wanna know about LSE sociology specifically--- it is hard to find sociology graduates from LSE.
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks I was just worried about career options. A mean, at the LSE Sociology bsc 2022 emtry website, they show you top 5 sectors last year sociology graduates worked in, and one of them is a factory i think. It says they worked at "manufacture if leather and other products". Cuz I don't wanna work at a factory making things. I wanna do social policies and stuff ---- civil service



Thats all the universities generally tho. A Sociology degree at LSE or other respected jni may differ (for sure)
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks I was just worried about career options. A mean, at the LSE Sociology bsc 2022 emtry website, they show you top 5 sectors last year sociology graduates worked in, and one of them is a factory i think. It says they worked at "manufacture if leather and other products". Cuz I don't wanna work at a factory making things. I wanna do social policies and stuff ---- civil service

I'm pretty certain LSE allows students to go into any industry which they like just because of the reputation of the uni; I personally don't think the uni will hold you back in any way, and if you get a first or 2.1 in psychology you would have as good of a chance as someone getting the same grades at Bath or Bristol. Also, you may find many people do a sociology degree from LSE just to branch out into finance or law. Maybe join a few group chats and ask a few people what they aspire to be. Most people who go to LSE are very career-driven so that's another thing to note. Also, look at LSE on LinkedIn, and see the companies you're looking to work with and whether or not LSE has alumni in that field.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 7
Original post by Courtesy
I'm pretty certain LSE allows students to go into any industry which they like just because of the reputation of the uni; I personally don't think the uni will hold you back in any way, and if you get a first or 2.1 in psychology you would have as good of a chance as someone getting the same grades at Bath or Bristol. Also, you may find many people do a sociology degree from LSE just to branch out into finance or law. Maybe join a few group chats and ask a few people what they aspire to be. Most people who go to LSE are very career-driven so that's another thing to note. Also, look at LSE on LinkedIn, and see the companies you're looking to work with and whether or not LSE has alumni in that field.

I am not sure about your info here tbh. Not offending you but I thought that Sociology degree is nothing to do with finance (well it is related to law in a way). Sociology is nothing like economics or finance and I have no idea why it would get me to finance jobs lmao. I don't think many people could even do that.
Original post by Anonymous
I am not sure about your info here tbh. Not offending you but I thought that Sociology degree is nothing to do with finance (well it is related to law in a way). Sociology is nothing like economics or finance and I have no idea why it would get me to finance jobs lmao. I don't think many people could even do that.

Well, contrary to your beliefs many people do. More recently, many more investment banks and consultancies have been employing students who come from a non-finance background to diversify their employees, be that students who do STEM or humanities, or even subjects in social sciences (like law and sociology). I predict you will find a fair few on your course who are looking to branch out into finance in the future. Students can go into IB/Consulting with any degree, and nowadays it is mostly about getting into the target universities (like LSE) and work experience than the actual course.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 9
Original post by Courtesy
Well, contrary to your beliefs many people do. More recently, many more investment banks and consultancies have been employing students who come from a non-finance background to diversify their employees, be that students who do STEM or humanities, or even subjects in social sciences (like law and sociology). I predict you will find a fair few on your course who are looking to branch out into finance in the future. Students can go into IB/Consulting with any degree, and nowadays it is mostly about getting into the target universities (like LSE) and work experience than the actual course.

A mean I trust you more than myself (in the end I am using TSR cuz I do know nothing in this field of knowledge).
Why would LSE be of a better chance than other universities at getting better internships in finance (even if I may have an irrelevant degree)? is there a specific reason for that?

So let's say mathematics students at Bristol (do not want to offend anyone - just giving an example of mathematics student who would have a related degree to finance) want to do finance and I (Sociology at LSE) want to do finance. What is that opportunity and support I get from LSE that would give me more chance than Mathematics Bristol student
Original post by Anonymous
A mean I trust you more than myself (in the end I am using TSR cuz I do know nothing in this field of knowledge).
Why would LSE be of a better chance than other universities at getting better internships in finance (even if I may have an irrelevant degree)? is there a specific reason for that?

So let's say mathematics students at Bristol (do not want to offend anyone - just giving an example of mathematics student who would have a related degree to finance) want to do finance and I (Sociology at LSE) want to do finance. What is that opportunity and support I get from LSE that would give me more chance than Mathematics Bristol student

Well, the Mathematics course at Bristol is very strong, and Bristol is still a semi-target so I'd say you would stand an equal chance with a Bristol Mathematics candidate, but I could be wrong. As for your first question, LSE is a brand, and when employers see your resume they see that you go to LSE and they will almost automatically assume you are a very strong and able candidate. This is because they have seen many strong alumni come from LSE, so they have a broad reputation in their minds that LSE produces top grads, no matter the degree the student is doing. Having said that, if the Bristol Maths student had a more relevant experience in that niche area they would probably stand a far better chance of securing the role than you if you had no experience whatsoever. In IB and Consultancy recruiting they care far more about the skills you learnt from university than the content you learnt, so maybe LSE teaches students to learn more independently and have a stronger work ethic. I've heard that LSE students work even harder than Oxbridge students (though I find this hard to believe).
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Courtesy
I've heard that LSE students work even harder than Oxbridge students (though I find this hard to believe).

Probably not, if this was imperial then perhaps.
So to OP: most jobs in the UK don't require specific degrees (including majority of jobs in finance - investment banking, sales and trading, equity research etc and consulting) these industries need people from all sorts of skillsets and backgrounds to succeed and primarily operate recruitment by targeting universities. LSE is a top target school for many industries and you will find many employers lining up and paying to be involved at your careers fairs and in your careers booklets. Network whilst at LSE and apply to internships/insights for whatever field you want - you will be fine.
Original post by leviticus.
Probably not, if this was imperial then perhaps.

Might be true because there are 70 percent international students (undergraduate and postgraduate). But idk
Original post by Anonymous
Might be true because there are 70 percent international students (undergraduate and postgraduate). But idk

what has that got to do with workload?
Original post by leviticus.
what has that got to do with workload?

More Competitiveness and pressure perhaps
Original post by Anonymous
More Competitiveness and pressure perhaps

I don't see how a higher % of international students leads to that...how hard people voluntarily work is determined by them but the bear minimum required for a good grade is set by how rigorous the university itself is. Oxbridge, with its weekly essays and short terms is really more rigorous than anywhere other than imperial afaik.
Original post by leviticus.
I don't see how a higher % of international students leads to that...how hard people voluntarily work is determined by them but the bear minimum required for a good grade is set by how rigorous the university itself is. Oxbridge, with its weekly essays and short terms is really more rigorous than anywhere other than imperial afaik.

My homecountry is south korea. By your logic, mad education competitiveness (how hard korean students "voluntarily" work) in Korea is dependent on them. The competitiveness is due to the peer pressure and culture which sets up the grade boundaries higher expecting everyone to work harder. Considering that korea isn't the only country with this sort of eduction (also China and India etc.), I meant that having more international students would increase the overall competitiveness of the modules provided at LSE. Imagine that other peers are reading 5 books while you aren't. Since LSE is the "social science" uni, the expectations of the essays and the grade boundary would be very high due to those who would work very hard and by the international culture where they are already used to working hard. In A levels, even some of us would've worked very hard, most of the students didn't push their limits as much. However, some international students have already. This would bring a culture of peer pressure in which through many would be pressured to read more trying to chase the expectations set up by many internati9nal students.

But you are also write in noting that it isnalso about the University itself in which how much work they give you. However, I was giving an alternative view discussing the possibility that it could also be the uni culture itself which might make the students study harder.
Original post by Anonymous
My homecountry is south korea. By your logic, mad education competitiveness (how hard korean students "voluntarily" work) in Korea is dependent on them. The competitiveness is due to the peer pressure and culture which sets up the grade boundaries higher expecting everyone to work harder. Considering that korea isn't the only country with this sort of eduction (also China and India etc.), I meant that having more international students would increase the overall competitiveness of the modules provided at LSE. Imagine that other peers are reading 5 books while you aren't. Since LSE is the "social science" uni, the expectations of the essays and the grade boundary would be very high due to those who would work very hard and by the international culture where they are already used to working hard. In A levels, even some of us would've worked very hard, most of the students didn't push their limits as much. However, some international students have already. This would bring a culture of peer pressure in which through many would be pressured to read more trying to chase the expectations set up by many internati9nal students.

But you are also write in noting that it isnalso about the University itself in which how much work they give you. However, I was giving an alternative view discussing the possibility that it could also be the uni culture itself which might make the students study harder.

Right*

I made so many typos and mistakes please ignore lmao
Original post by Anonymous
My homecountry is south korea. By your logic, mad education competitiveness (how hard korean students "voluntarily" work) in Korea is dependent on them. The competitiveness is due to the peer pressure and culture which sets up the grade boundaries higher expecting everyone to work harder. Considering that korea isn't the only country with this sort of eduction (also China and India etc.), I meant that having more international students would increase the overall competitiveness of the modules provided at LSE. Imagine that other peers are reading 5 books while you aren't. Since LSE is the "social science" uni, the expectations of the essays and the grade boundary would be very high due to those who would work very hard and by the international culture where they are already used to working hard. In A levels, even some of us would've worked very hard, most of the students didn't push their limits as much. However, some international students have already. This would bring a culture of peer pressure in which through many would be pressured to read more trying to chase the expectations set up by many internati9nal students.

But you are also write in noting that it isnalso about the University itself in which how much work they give you. However, I was giving an alternative view discussing the possibility that it could also be the uni culture itself which might make the students study harder.

British universities have set grade boundaries... 60% for a 2:1 and 70 for a first. They are unimpacted by the performance of your peers so yes, much of it still self-applied. I would like to imagine that London offers so much in relation to social activities and nightlife that most wouldn't be reading so much but it is what it is i guess. Getting peer-pressured to study more when your grades aren't affected by their performance is kinda beta mentality ngl.

LSE's definitely a very rigorous school, just don't think as much as Oxbridge who have 8 week terms and imperial that is notorious for having probably the worst student life in the UK.

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