green pepper
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I am doing Edquas and will be going to Year 10. I have read that I need to know set texts off by heart and vocab. I feel like I will struggle with the grammer. Any advice with the grammer? Any resources I could use ( I know about cambridge latin course)
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tantania
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(Original post by green pepper)
I am doing Edquas and will be going to Year 10. I have read that I need to know set set off by heart and vocab. I feel like I will struggle with the grammer. Any advice with the grammer? Any resources I could use ( I know about camebridge latin course)
Hi! I'm going into year 10 too and am also doing latin! For the vocab if you need to save time on making notes there's lots of premade quizlet sets if you search the titles and although for GCSE you don't need to write out the tables, it's helpful to do that in revision to memorise them so when you're In your exam, if you aren't sure on endings when translating you can quickly write them out. For grammar, that's where I get stuck too haha, it helped me in my y9 exams to go through each concept and make mini mind maps of how they work and practice spotting different grammar in translations. I hope this is helpful!
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green pepper
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Yes Thank you
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Classics_Teacher
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Which textbooks are you using at school?I use the Cambridge Latin Course for Years 7 and 8, but switch to Latin to GCSE for Years 9-11 (we have a 3-year GCSE course). It's well worth getting hold of a copy of both Part 1 and Part 2 and working your way through it. In my opinion, it explains the grammar in a much clearer way than the Cambridge Latin Course and there are lots of sentences to practice your translation skills.

It might also be worth thinking about getting a tutor if that's a possibility. Some good sites to look are Tutorful and Tutorfair. You can order the results by distance (if you prefer face-to-face) or by cost (if you prefer online learning).

Hope this helps!
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green pepper
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My school uses Cambridge Latin Course for year 7-9, but I think I will get different textbooks for gcse. Does Latin to GCSE provide answers? I have seen the book and it's OCR vocab, is there much of a difference between ocr and edquas?
Classics_Teacher
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ashtolga23
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I nearly dropped Latin because I was concerned it would be my lowest grade, but as a result it was one of the only ones I revised properly for, and it ended up being my highest mark.

For me, grammar wasn't majorly important. I tried to have a basic grasp of it. Quizlet was the BEST for flashcards and mapping progress with vocabulary. I made powerpoints as a revision material for the other components.
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green pepper
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(Original post by Classics_Teacher)
Which textbooks are you using at school?I use the Cambridge Latin Course for Years 7 and 8, but switch to Latin to GCSE for Years 9-11 (we have a 3-year GCSE course). It's well worth getting hold of a copy of both Part 1 and Part 2 and working your way through it. In my opinion, it explains the grammar in a much clearer way than the Cambridge Latin Course and there are lots of sentences to practice your translation skills.

It might also be worth thinking about getting a tutor if that's a possibility. Some good sites to look are Tutorful and Tutorfair. You can order the results by distance (if you prefer face-to-face) or by cost (if you prefer online learning).

Hope this helps!
Hi my school is using subarani
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neuro_cola
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I got a 9 at gcse latin ocr but I hope these tips still help. 1) quizlet - for learning vocab, for learning set texts, everything. You can make some on irregular verbs, pronouns, even summarising grammar points. Just make sure you review as you go along. So that you don't get the week before the exam and you're trying to learn all your vocab. 2) learn all your vocab + noun/verb endings - the vocab list is invaluable. If you can learn your vocab in all its principle parts (porto, portare, portavi, portatus etc) then you'll easily be able to recognise these in the exam. I found it useful to write all the different noun endings and verb endings up and then stick them on my bedroom wall so I saw them everyday and I became more familiar with the different endings (especially 3rd dec and neuter nouns). 3) make essay plans - I don't know if this applies to all specs but ocr had 8 marker (analysis of latin) and 10 markers (essay based on set text in english). So say you're doing the Aeneid, it can be like what does Virgil do to show pathos in this section (for an 8-marker). The best thing to do would be organise you points in case you get this question based on each section you learn. Same with the 10-markers. With ocr, 8-markers quote the latin and with 10-markers quote the english. With your 10-markers you could add some context like Aeneas reflecting Augustus, Virgil being against war because at the time he was writing Rome had entered a time of unprecedented peace, even maybe comparing Aeneas to heros from the Iliad and the odyssey (you don't really need to do this at gcse but for a 9 you could). 4) mark schemes - for literature there may be old mark schemes on your set texts that shows you the kind of analysis examiners are looking for and how many points you need to make for the marks. 5) timing - it can be easy to lose marks so I advise practising under timed conditions, you can alwayd ask your teachers about this more because they know that this is a main issue at gcse. 6) your teachers - ask your teachers for help if you need it. If you don't understand a grammar point or you're struggling to learn the translation ask your teachers for strategies or arrange to meet at a lunchtime to sort it out. I know not all teachers are willing to help so if that's not possible maybe speak to people have done the gcse (like on tsr).

Anyway, I hope that helps. I loved latin gcse and even decided to take it for a-level!
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green pepper
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(Original post by neuro_cola)
I got a 9 at gcse latin ocr but I hope these tips still help. 1) quizlet - for learning vocab, for learning set texts, everything. You can make some on irregular verbs, pronouns, even summarising grammar points. Just make sure you review as you go along. So that you don't get the week before the exam and you're trying to learn all your vocab. 2) learn all your vocab + noun/verb endings - the vocab list is invaluable. If you can learn your vocab in all its principle parts (porto, portare, portavi, portatus etc) then you'll easily be able to recognise these in the exam. I found it useful to write all the different noun endings and verb endings up and then stick them on my bedroom wall so I saw them everyday and I became more familiar with the different endings (especially 3rd dec and neuter nouns). 3) make essay plans - I don't know if this applies to all specs but ocr had 8 marker (analysis of latin) and 10 markers (essay based on set text in english). So say you're doing the Aeneid, it can be like what does Virgil do to show pathos in this section (for an 8-marker). The best thing to do would be organise you points in case you get this question based on each section you learn. Same with the 10-markers. With ocr, 8-markers quote the latin and with 10-markers quote the english. With your 10-markers you could add some context like Aeneas reflecting Augustus, Virgil being against war because at the time he was writing Rome had entered a time of unprecedented peace, even maybe comparing Aeneas to heros from the Iliad and the odyssey (you don't really need to do this at gcse but for a 9 you could). 4) mark schemes - for literature there may be old mark schemes on your set texts that shows you the kind of analysis examiners are looking for and how many points you need to make for the marks. 5) timing - it can be easy to lose marks so I advise practising under timed conditions, you can alwayd ask your teachers about this more because they know that this is a main issue at gcse. 6) your teachers - ask your teachers for help if you need it. If you don't understand a grammar point or you're struggling to learn the translation ask your teachers for strategies or arrange to meet at a lunchtime to sort it out. I know not all teachers are willing to help so if that's not possible maybe speak to people have done the gcse (like on tsr).

Anyway, I hope that helps. I loved latin gcse and even decided to take it for a-level!
Thank you so so much for writing a long answer. I have just started latin gcse and I feel like I am regretting it already. I am not sure about the essay writing, since we haven't done anything like that yet.
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