Sanskrit 2: Electric Boogaloo!

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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#41
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#41
Yaaaaaaay that seems to have worked out pretty well! Great that you can do this module, especially as it sounds like the option won't be there in future years! :eek3: Thank goodness for private donors, eh? :adore:
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artful_lounger
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#42
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#42
(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
Yaaaaaaay that seems to have worked out pretty well! Great that you can do this module, especially as it sounds like the option won't be there in future years! :eek3: Thank goodness for private donors, eh? :adore:
Yes indeed! Fortunately also the lecturer for the philosophy module I am now dropping was one of the ones organising to get Prakrit to continue so he was happy to hear I was taking Prakrit even though it meant I couldn't take his module
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artful_lounger
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#43
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#43

Weekend update

So, this weekend I've mostly just been chugging through the homework!



Prakrit

Yesterday I got all caught up on the Prakrit work (just need to type it up), which as well as more parsing introduced verbs and some simple sentences to translate/compose. The verbal system in Maharashtri Prakrit seems mercifully much simpler than in Sanskrit - the whole conjugational root system seems to have disappeared in favour of more typical stem based conjugation, and it seems like there is mostly just one conjugation? The notes indicated they could be translated in past, future, or present with the same conjugation at least. I'm going to highlight this when I type up my exercises as a query to get confirmation. Based on my discussion with the lecturer on Friday it seems like the past passive participle is most typically used to form the past tense though (hence the ergative nature of the language).


Sanskrit

As such today I'm working through the Sanskrit homework which is...kind of kicking my ass :cry:

I thought it would be a fairly nice and gently exercise as well! It was "just" to identify (and presumably, parse) the verb forms and roots from a set of sentences. However, once I got started working on them I realised that was easier said than done, because all had full sandhi and the annoying devanagari convention of sticking words together. Between the two of those a lot of the verbs ended up being almost unrecognisable, certainly at least from their root! I guess I forgot we're second year Sanskrit students now so actually need to get used to "proper" Sanskrit - since I'd spent all of yesterday on introductory language type sentences which were all very nice and simple, it was a bit of a shock

No joke, one sentence it took me nearly 40 minutes to find the verb and hence its root...the last few have been a bit easier though, thankfully. I'm a little over halfway through so going to take a bit of a break (hence, this post ), then polish it off and type both the Sanskrit and Prakrit stuff up.

Then hopefully I will have some time to try and translate at least one or two verses of the Raghuvaṃśa for the kāvya module I'm auditing so I can do a little more than sit there blankly letting the Sanskrit wash over me
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artful_lounger
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#44
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#44
Well i finished the homework but then my parent decided this evening while I'm trying to type it up neatly is a great time to deal with all years of the junk she's stuffed into the room I'm working from, so apparently I can't actually do my academic work 🙃🙃🙃
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artful_lounger
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#45
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#45


Week 3 Update

Lectures were a bit of a blur this week! In Sanskrit we mostly looked at more grammar, mainly the perfect tense, although also did have time to do a little bit of translating. For our homework we've started translating the story of Nala and Damayanti, which we've been advised is a "rite of passage" for all Sanskrit students before moving onto the Gita, on the basis that it's covered in Lanman's Sanskrit reader before the Gita section and everyone apparently learns Sanskrit using Lanman!

The homework was just to do as much as we can, I only managed to translate ten śloka as it was really slow going at first...a couple were ok but a lot of them took me a long time to work out (and I'm still not too confident in some). Lanman also has a habit of not glossing words that I would be completely unable to find otherwise...like Akshauhinipatir, which was impossible to work out and Akshauhini was not in the dictionary, and I only discovered by googling it and finding that it's a particular sort of battle formation/army composition and so the Akshauhinipatir would then be the "leader of the Akshauhini" i.e. general. There was an amusing bit where Lanman referred to the description of Damayanti being considered beautiful by everyone due to being beautiful (through the use of four more or less equivalent words describing it!) as a "reprehensible tautology"

For Prakrit of course I'm just independently studying for the most part, this week was the feminine long-a stem nouns. All largely familiar from Sanskrit so nothing unduly difficult. However the compounds are tripping me up a bit so the lecturer sent me an extra handout on compounds in Prakrit - they're pretty much the same as in Sanskrit (which doesn't entirely help because Sanskrit compounds also trip me up!) so I need to spend a bit of time reviewing that.

Once again I ended up with no time to prepare for the kāvya module I'm auditing...I need to just try and do some work on that at the end of every day I think since my current plan of "work on it after working on all my other modules" just means I'm not having enough time at the end of the weekend to do anything

Outside of uni it seems my contract is likely to be renewed, which is good in one sense but also going to be tricky because as above I'm already stretched a bit thin and I need to write a personal statement as well.

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artful_lounger
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#46
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#46

Update

I made the difficult decision to stop auditing the kāvya module I really wanted to follow it as this is the last year it's being offered but I just don't have time to prepare for the classes and get little out of them with minimal/no preparation. With the mid-term tests coming up in my other modules, my contract likely being extended, needing to work on my PS etc, it was just unfeasible to continue

This way I don't have the constant guilt of not preparing some verses for that, and also it buys me back Monday afternoons to work on other things. Especially as for Prakrit it was noted I made a lot of silly errors confusing singular and plural forms and that I really need to know the declensions inside and out. Sad that I had to do so but there wasn't really anything else I could drop to get that time back :/

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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#47
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#47
Sorry for being so silent, just caught up on about 5 of your blog entries

That's nice of that lecturer to give you an extra handout! A shame that you won't be auditing that module but it was all sounding like a lot.

Let me know if I can be of any assistance, re: PS (assuming you mean a UCAS PS?)

Hugs!
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artful_lounger
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#48
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#48
(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
Sorry for being so silent, just caught up on about 5 of your blog entries

That's nice of that lecturer to give you an extra handout! A shame that you won't be auditing that module but it was all sounding like a lot.

Let me know if I can be of any assistance, re: PS (assuming you mean a UCAS PS?)

Hugs!
:hugs: thank you for your support!

And yes it is a UCAS PS :afraid: I may take you up on that I haven't started yet though and probably won't until at least next week...or maybe reading week (which might be next week anyway, I've lost track already!), as I have the mid-term test for Sanskrit to work on before Friday this week Fortunately that looks OK based on the cursory glance over I've given it earlier today...
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artful_lounger
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#49
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#49
Update for Week 4!

Bit late with the update this week, been a busy week!

We had the Sanskrit test from Wednesday to Friday, which I think was OK, although after I submitted I realised annoyingly LaTeX messed up the diacritics on tṝ (the root from which we get among other things, the word avatar - a form of which I was parsing!). For some reason it put the macron over a blank space between the t and r. We're up to verse...14? I think? In the story of Nala and Damayanti in class now otherwise.

So far we've had the introduction to how Nala is pretty great at everything (especially horsemanship and archery though), and how Damayanti is pretty beautiful and beloved by everyone (and "as if forked lightning" which is a somewhat odd comparison on the surface; I get the impression it's to do with perceptions of radiance, and also possibly some reference to Indra and Shachi, since Nala has been compared to Indra and Damayanti to Shachi, and Indra is associated with lightning, I think?). We also had a bit of background how Damayanti (and her three brothers) was given to her father Bhimā and his wife, who wanted children but for some reason hadn't been able to have any, due to their hospitality to Damana, a priestly sage.

Prakrit work went OK I think, I tried to be a bit more attentive to the endings to avoid mixing up plural and singular endings and other silly mistakes. This week was mostly looking at some further verbal conjugations including the causative, and also some pronouns. Nothing really particularly unusual came up, other than the use of the nominative as the subject complement of "to be" (i.e. using the nominative case in a situation where the nom. word is actually an object grammatically). But that was mentioned in the first week's notes, just hasn't come up yet and threw me a little at first.

Although I should really start preparing more verses form Nala and Damayanti, I think I'm just going to take today off because I'm a bit drained after the test earlier this week and balancing that with work and then doing all the Prakrit work in one afternoon! I'll probably just focus on preparing the verses by parsing the grammar and glossing the words but not actually writing a translation proper and then working through the translations in the class in real time. Our Sanskrit lecturer has said that we should emphasise quantity over quality in prepping the verses for class for I think this reason (to focus on the translation in the class and working out grammatical constructions, rather than the grammar or meanings of individual words) so I think this should be OK.

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artful_lounger
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#50
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#50

A Bit of Sanskrit Culture!

I thought I'd also do a little extra update to share a bit of interesting discussion from our last Sanskrit class as well

While working through the story of Nala and Damayanti, we came across the term sumadhyamā; the dictionary entry for which had, among other definitions "a graceful woman". There was also under sumadhyama (which might've been an undeclined form?) "slender waisted". In Lanman's translation he gave it as "fair-waisted" which seemed a little too "meaningless epithet" in the vein of e.g. the Iliad or something (which to be fair isn't necessarily incorrect or far from the mark as N & D was from the MBh. which is an epic text) so I went with "graceful" as an adjective.

As a result we talked a bit about the meaning which came from the prefix su- meaning usually "good/excellent" and madhyama "middle", but also "middle of the body=waist". Apparently both the good/fair waisted and graceful meanings are related as in the classical Indian/South Asian perception, a woman who was sumadhyama was the ideal woman, and it indicate a form which was essentially a very tiny waist, but offset by wide hips and bust. Thus the most sumadhyama women were actually at risk of flopping over due to how narrow their middles were and how top heavy they were! As a result, they would be imagined to make very small, carefully controlled movements - hence "graceful".

Pretty interesting (and amusing, in a sense!) insight into classical South Asia I thought! Also some interesting parallels with e.g. modern criticisms of Barbie's body being unrealistic and those common internet discussions about how if she actually existed in the flesh she would have her neck at risk of flopping over etc - not too far from the issues that might've been encountered in a similarly idealised female form from a different time and culture!

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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#51
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#51
Loving the comparison there with Barbie - very true though! Some South Asians can be so shallow about appearances tbh (hence why some South Asian women end up bleaching their skin, etc)

Hope you are giving yourself that rest you mentioned :yep:
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gjd800
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#52
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#52
(Original post by artful_lounger)

A Bit of Sanskrit Culture!

I thought I'd also do a little extra update to share a bit of interesting discussion from our last Sanskrit class as well

While working through the story of Nala and Damayanti, we came across the term sumadhyamā; the dictionary entry for which had, among other definitions "a graceful woman". There was also under sumadhyama (which might've been an undeclined form?) "slender waisted". In Lanman's translation he gave it as "fair-waisted" which seemed a little too "meaningless epithet" in the vein of e.g. the Iliad or something (which to be fair isn't necessarily incorrect or far from the mark as N & D was from the MBh. which is an epic text) so I went with "graceful" as an adjective.

As a result we talked a bit about the meaning which came from the prefix su- meaning usually "good/excellent" and madhyama "middle", but also "middle of the body=waist". Apparently both the good/fair waisted and graceful meanings are related as in the classical Indian/South Asian perception, a woman who was sumadhyama was the ideal woman, and it indicate a form which was essentially a very tiny waist, but offset by wide hips and bust. Thus the most sumadhyama women were actually at risk of flopping over due to how narrow their middles were and how top heavy they were! As a result, they would be imagined to make very small, carefully controlled movements - hence "graceful".

Pretty interesting (and amusing, in a sense!) insight into classical South Asia I thought! Also some interesting parallels with e.g. modern criticisms of Barbie's body being unrealistic and those common internet discussions about how if she actually existed in the flesh she would have her neck at risk of flopping over etc - not too far from the issues that might've been encountered in a similarly idealised female form from a different time and culture!

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A lot of my work hinges on madhya(maka) and is linguistic in nature, oddly!
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artful_lounger
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#53
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#53
(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
Loving the comparison there with Barbie - very true though! Some South Asians can be so shallow about appearances tbh (hence why some South Asian women end up bleaching their skin, etc)

Hope you are giving yourself that rest you mentioned :yep:
Yeah I've heard about that

And yes, or a bit at least! Fortunately next week is reading week and I have it as leave from work so I have the whole week totally free! (except one bit of Prakrit work I'll need to, which I might actually try and do on Friday if I have time to just get it out of the way)

(Original post by gjd800)
A lot of my work hinges on madhya(maka) and is linguistic in nature, oddly!
That's interesting! I tried looking that up but didn't really understand a lot of it Something to revisit again (maybe next week when I have some more time to think about it ). While we were discussing the Gita which we'll start reading later in the term our lecturer did say that a lot of the time you can perfectly parse all the grammar but still have no idea what they are saying because it can be so abstract and philosophical, so I'm sure I'll be getting into some related concepts soon! She gave an example of them talking about being coming from non-being for instance (which I can see while translating I might be a bit puzzled by if I'm thinking about things very literally as I usually am when translating!).
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gjd800
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#54
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#54
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Yeah I've heard about that

And yes, or a bit at least! Fortunately next week is reading week and I have it as leave from work so I have the whole week totally free! (except one bit of Prakrit work I'll need to, which I might actually try and do on Friday if I have time to just get it out of the way)



That's interesting! I tried looking that up but didn't really understand a lot of it Something to revisit again (maybe next week when I have some more time to think about it ). While we were discussing the Gita which we'll start reading later in the term our lecturer did say that a lot of the time you can perfectly parse all the grammar but still have no idea what they are saying because it can be so abstract and philosophical, so I'm sure I'll be getting into some related concepts soon! She gave an example of them talking about being coming from non-being for instance (which I can see while translating I might be a bit puzzled by if I'm thinking about things very literally as I usually am when translating!).
Haha yeah, that is the beauty of it for me! I get a bit bored with the later era scholastic Skt stuff because the style is much less poetic and allegorical. I think Skt is at its best when used in those ambiguous, needs-big-interpretation-y ways
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artful_lounger
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#55
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#55
Week 5 Update
A bit late, being updated in reading week

Sanskrit

In Sanskrit we finished the first canto of Nala and Damayanti. After all the extended descriptions of each being basically "awesome", and Damayanti and her brothers being a gift to Bhimā as a reward for his hospitality to the priestly sage Danamana (sp? I might've added too many na's...bit like Nanny Ogg and spelling banana, I know how to start writing it but not when to stop!), Damayanti was visited by a goldem hamṣa (=goose, see last year's GYG for a discussion about hamṣa!) who spoke to her and told her about Nala, she then directed the goose to go and speak with Nala in the same way it spoke to her (i.e. to give him a good account of her). The hamṣa dutifully did so, and after telling Nala that it is not to be killed, promised him that if he married Damayanti they would be rewarded with great fortune/outcomes (? can't quite remember what we did for the translation here).

After reading week we'll return to the second canto and finish that off, before starting on the Gita For reading week (this week!) I was going to try and do like "a verse a day" on this GYG blog, but then it occurred to me the verses I would be translating I'd be submitting as part of my portfolio assignment thing at the end of term so I probably shouldn't post my translations and/or grammatical analysis online in case it gets flagged for plagiarism :O Also I then promptly didn't do any verses over the weekend anyway In any case my plan IS to do at least one verse (ślok) each day which is a pretty small amount of work (usually!) and so very manageable while still being able to "take it easy" this week, plus then I'll have completed at least the first 10 verses of the second canto of Nala and Damayanti for the first week back (and potentially made headway for the following week's work).


Prakrit

For Prakrit the major new topic was the past (passive) participle, the very same -ta participle from Sanskrit (albeit the suffix becomes -ya). Prakrit doesn't have a past tense as such and so it's more or less wholly formed using the past participle (there is a sort of perphrastic perfect using the participle and "to be", and there is some remnant of the Aorist apparently), which gives rise to the ergative nature of Prakrit (compared with Sanskrit which has some sense of this but not as strongly). As mentioned over the summer in relation to that online article I read this must surely be the source of Hindi's ergativity, since Prakrit would've been the "common" language that presumably would've had a stronger influence on the subsequent development of Hindi as a "general" spoken and written language (compared to Skt. which was much more scholastic, to take gjd800's phrase!).

I actually kind of struggled with the Prakrit exercises this week. I think it was mostly a case of confusing myself unnecessarily, as it wasn't explicitly stated that the ptc. agreed in case gender and number and took the endings from the declensions studied thus far. I sort of assumed this but was confused as it WAS explicitly stated the endings they took when agreeing with pronouns. Also I had to start thinking again in that passive structure of instrument/agent for translating and composing sentences which is always a little odd to think of explicitly (even though the exact same construction is used in English for the passive, albeit without case endings). In the end I didn't manage to finish it by the end of the week so had to let the lecturer know I would get it to him today after working on it over the weekend. I think that helped in a way (especially as I took Saturday "off") as when I came back to it with fresh eyes it made a bit more sense (I think!). Hopefully I didn't make too many mistakes...


Non-academic stuff (pretty much just gaming!)

Moving away from monster hunter at the moment...kind of in the position where I either need to do some pretty tedious grinding, or do a REALLY hard fight that most of the time fails within 8 minutes or so, which is a bit disheartening. Maybe I should try and pick up a different weapon type and actually learn to use it, instead of mindlessly using sticky ammo heavy bowgun

I redownloaded Final Fantasy XI to try playing again I forgot how...strange, it was, compared to other MMOs. I'm trying to unlock the Blue Mage job, but to do so I first need to unlock a new area, and to do that I need to get a bunch of reputation with one particular city (or have a bunch of gil, which I don't have ) so it's very much back to grinding. I managed to at least figure out what I was doing when I last logged in (in 2013!), which was unlocking the Chocobo license, which also made it a lot faster going between cities at least

Also TFT has the new set out...which so far I'm kind of not enjoying, mostly because I've not yet found a comp I'm "comfortable" with...placed into Iron II in ranked initially which was hilarious (I literally lost every single placement match...), especially as I finished last season in Plat (III, I think). Up to Bronze III now, long ways to go to get at least Gold so I get the end of set rewards...


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artful_lounger
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#56
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#56

Week 6

This week has been super busy! It's also flown by as a result...it turned out our Sanskrit lecturer didn't mean 10 verses per week from Nala and Damayanti, but 10 per class was her aim, so I found out on Monday I had immediately fallen behind

Then I also had a Prakrit assignment (summative) to submit this week; so far all the exercises have just been formative assignments. On top of that it was quite a long set of exercises, as there were at least twice (maybe three times!) as many words in the parsing section as usual, since instead of individual words it was short fragments/sentences, but none indicated a specific word was to be parsed so I had to parse everything :bricks:

On top of that, since I was off work last week I had to catch up on everything that happened when I was away...along with all the new dramas that came up (mostly around vaccine passports).

Also last week I wrote my personal statement for applying through UCAS this year D: I submitted it to the PS review service here which had some really good feedback so going to tweak it a little more..soon? I was going to do it over the weekend but with the Sanskrit work I probably won't have time...maybe later next week. I then need to send it off to my referee with everything else so she can check it before she writes her reference for me. I think I may need to set up a zoom meeting with her to briefly talk about that as I might need her to summarise my results so far (since I couldn't seem to find a way to add modules to a CertHE on UCAS) and maybe outline my reasons for having previously left my studies to contextualise as "this is no longer a problem"?


Sanskrit
We've now done 18 verses from the second canto of Nala and Damayanti - our lecturer was hoping for 20 but we fell a bit short. Typically on Wednesday the verse I got was the one that I couldn't make heads or tails of at all at least we were able to go through it but I felt like it made it look like I hadn't tried to prepare for the class

Also these last few verses were somewhat confusing, although reassuringly apparently some points were confusing to Lanman as well - our lecturer was VERY perturbed that he suggested a locative was "in logical apposition" to an ablative, and after checking the critical edition agreed with the latter that it was probably a corrupted vocative, rather than a locative (it was also at the end of the fourth pada which is where one might expect to find a vocative to fill the metre anyway apparently).

I think our lecturer really wants to start the Gita next week on Wednesday so I'm expecting we're going to try and cover the final 12 verses on Monday, so I have a fair bit of work to do over the weekend (usually I aim for 10, and end up falling short anyway...). So I've got my work cut out for me over the weekend! I should probably try and do a verse or two today, since I got the Prakrit done a bit earlier than usual...but I'm also pretty fatigued after everything this week so might just take the afternoon off to chill and play FFXI


Prakrit

Ostensibly the main focus of this week were two new declensions, the feminine long i/u stems, plus some enclitics. In practice it turned out that it continued a lot of the past-tense work from the previous week, which is probably a good thing since I made a fair few mistakes with that, but also some of it was a bit tricky. That said, it turned out that some of the hardest sentences to compose into Prakrit for the final section were the simplest in English! I was thrown a bit by some of the passive structure sentences having accusatives or (what appeared to be) extra nominatives in them. In the end I think I came out with a reasonable translation though. The composition was tricky however for several of the sentences, although at least I managed to catch some singular/plural ending mix-up errors before submission (which has been a continual thing I keep making silly mistakes on).

Since I had to submit this week's assignment to turnitin, I can't/don't want to say too much specifically to avoid it potentially flagging for plagiarism though So I can't really give any specific examples! I think the next topic is the gerund (or absolutive, as we learned it in Sanskrit); if it's like in Sanskrit then it should be fairly straightforward, I think? I do have the stuff for next week but haven't read through it yet



Non-academic stuff

Work remains busy, I constantly feel like there's something I've forgotten to do or an email I've forgotten to send...also some things have come up recently which suggests that there might be some much bigger and trickier tasks ahead which is due to a policy issue in the UK for the NHS which is all quite beyond our power and the scope of what we do, but we're getting a LOT of questions about it. Also, annoyingly, we're getting a lot of questions about simple things that got sent out to basically everyone in the company and so I'm having to waste time answering questions that were in an FAQ comms sent out ages ago...

Outside of work, and study, I've not had as much time as I might've liked this week! I missed DnD because of the Prakrit assignment (although it got cancelled in the end due to other people not being able to get there on time), although we've moved the evening we play on and the new one is a lot better for me at least. Otherwise I've been continuing playing FFXI Having unlocked blue mage I thought levelling would be quite slow and tedious but it's pretty fast and besides that, most of my time I'm focused on trying to find the monsters that I want to learn spells from (since all the blue mage's abilities are learned from having enemy monsters use them on you, or while fighting you) anyway

Mostly it's been pretty fun, and a lot less MMO-like than it otherwise would/should have been which is quite refreshing at this point (admittedly it is nearly a 20 year old game lol). That said, sometimes it's quite a grind trying to learn a particular spell...last weekend it took me six hours over two days to learn this one spell I gained 10 levels just trying to learn it! I've only been doing solo stuff so far though, soon I'll be able to start my artifact armour quests but I think I'll have to find groups for those as some of them look quite tough, so we'll see how successful that is.


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gjd800
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#57
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#57
The good news is that the Sanskrit in the Gita is much nicer than the stuff you're doing now, and so you should just be able to enjoy it!
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artful_lounger
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#58
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(Original post by gjd800)
The good news is that the Sanskrit in the Gita is much nicer than the stuff you're doing now, and so you should just be able to enjoy it!
Now that we've started the Gita officially this week, I definitely see what you mean! Translating it feels a lot more fluid and I can get into the flow of things better...I think possibly because there is a lot of repetition of vocab so I spend a lot less time looking up words and more time focusing on the grammar and translation, compared to Nala & Damayanti (which had I think at least 10 different words for "king" that I had to constantly look up because I didn't recognise the latest one!).

The only things I've so far had to look up regularly so far (after initially looking at something every 6 or 7 verses anyway) are the varied and many epithets for Krishna (and Arjuna, to a lesser extent)

It's definitely "nicer" to translate, whatever the cause!
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#59
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Now that we've started the Gita officially this week, I definitely see what you mean! Translating it feels a lot more fluid and I can get into the flow of things better...I think possibly because there is a lot of repetition of vocab so I spend a lot less time looking up words and more time focusing on the grammar and translation, compared to Nala & Damayanti (which had I think at least 10 different words for "king" that I had to constantly look up because I didn't recognise the latest one!).

The only things I've so far had to look up regularly so far (after initially looking at something every 6 or 7 verses anyway) are the varied and many epithets for Krishna (and Arjuna, to a lesser extent)

It's definitely "nicer" to translate, whatever the cause!
I was doing a bit last week just because I've not really done any for ages. Started with the Gita, all lovely. Then I moved onto Subhuticandra's thesaurus (I know, I know) and it's like, WHY DO YOU WRITE THIS WAY haha
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artful_lounger
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#60
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(Original post by gjd800)
I was doing a bit last week just because I've not really done any for ages. Started with the Gita, all lovely. Then I moved onto Subhuticandra's thesaurus (I know, I know) and it's like, WHY DO YOU WRITE THIS WAY haha
Haha, I know that feeling (albeit not in Sanskrit)...when I was doing Greek at the OU most of the adapted texts were fairly reasonable, and then we had one which was from the acts of the apostles and it just had these like 5 line long run on sentences with just one verb hidden in them which was excruciating

I actually asked a friend of mine who is a medievalist and works a lot on similar kinds of like, old English homilies and so on about that and he was like "yeah all the biblical stuff is like that lmao good luck"
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